In The Beginning

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  • Nice and easy, thanks.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
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    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Extremely easy!

    Thanks!

  • Easy one. Thank you for the question.

  • Maybe add to the explanation that SMALLDATETIME is 1900-01-01.

    Maybe some people doesn't know the ranges are different

  • It'd be good if the explanation included the reason for such a seemingly random year of 1753. 🙂

    For those that may not know, it is because of the move from the Julian Calendar to the Gregorian calendar in 1752 saw 11 days in September never occur. Because of this, SQL would not reliably/accurately calculate dates prior to 1753 (without some extensive development).

    http://www.projectbritain.com/calendar/january/lostdays.html

  • Nice question, thank you.

  • Kev T (11/25/2014)

    For those that may not know, it is because of the move from the Julian Calendar to the Gregorian calendar in 1752 saw 11 days in September never occur.

    Of course, that date only applies to the British Empire--the Gregorian calendar was actually introduced in 1582, but different countries introduced it at different times; Greece didn't adopt it until 1923!

  • Kev T (11/25/2014)


    It'd be good if the explanation included the reason for such a seemingly random year of 1753. 🙂

    For those that may not know, it is because of the move from the Julian Calendar to the Gregorian calendar in 1752 saw 11 days in September never occur. Because of this, SQL would not reliably/accurately calculate dates prior to 1753 (without some extensive development).

    http://www.projectbritain.com/calendar/january/lostdays.html%5B/quote%5D

    +1 for the information

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  • Thanks Paul, how interesting! I wonder how this is handled in Greece with regards to big data and historical records, or if they forgone the lost days somehow.

  • I could see why so many people answered 1/1/1900, based on the phrasing of the question. If you assign 0 to a datetime, that's the date you'll get in return.

  • That's exactly what I did. I had no idea I could use a negative number for a datetime!

  • I think this is a good question about the fundamentals of datetime. It consistently surprises me how people don't get a very simple concept. They honestly believe it's a validated string and stored that way. Anyway, thanks for a nice, simple question. I'm surprised it hasn't sparked too much debate yet. Then again, the thread is still young.

  • I could swore that it was sometime in 1975?

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