How To Write An Interview Winning Resume

  • John.Sansom

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    Comments posted to this topic are about the item How To Write An Interview Winning Resume


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • rktn_odin

    SSChasing Mays

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    First post?

    Also, excellent article!

  • John.Sansom

    SSCertifiable

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    rktn_odin (7/19/2012)


    Also, excellent article!

    Thanks, glad you enjoyed it!


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • M&M

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21679

    Good post John. I have one question. Suppose my content is published online on SQL Server sites like these and if I include those details on my resume, would it be considered as boastful by potential employers?

    M&M

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258955

    Nice write-up John.

    @Mohammed: it depends. One employer will love your community involvement and your ambition to broaden your knowledge, while another employer might think you're wasting company's time online.

    edit: fixed glaring typo

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  • ildjarn.is.dead

    Right there with Babe

    Points: 717

    > All good Data Professionals have excellent attention to detail, fail to get this one right and you’re pretty much just demonstrating that you don’t have what it takes.

    Wellllllll....

    > Stay away from creative fonts and color palletes

    Proper spelling is hard. And yes, I will make spelling errors too.

  • M&M

    SSC-Insane

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    Koen Verbeeck (7/19/2012)


    Nice write-up John.

    @Mohammed: it depends. One employer will love your community involvement and your ambition to broaden your knowledge, while another employer might think your wasting company's time online.

    Yes, I agree.

    M&M

  • John.Sansom

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    mohammed moinudheen (7/19/2012)


    Good post John. I have one question. Suppose my content is published online on SQL Server sites like these and if I include those details on my resume, would it be considered as boastful by potential employers?

    Thanks Mohammed.

    That's an interesting question! Me personal preference is to not mention articles/blog posts on a resume because they can be found easily enough via a simple internet search on a given candidate. That said, if I felt that an article/published work was particularly relevant to a role and clearly demonstrated value, then I might consider mentioning it.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • John.Sansom

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    Koen Verbeeck (7/19/2012)


    Nice write-up John.

    edit: fixed glaring typo

    Thanks Koen.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • Samuel Vella

    SSCrazy Eights

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    With regards to the relevancy and a "catch all" resume..

    I've been using a catch all for the past 6 years as a contractor and I've never been out of work more than a couple of weeks. I'm currently on contract number 9 and will be looking for my 10th soon.

    Instead of paring the resume down to what the job is asking for, I've trimmed it down to what I want to do. Relevancy isn't just for the employer!

    The IT job market, especially in the UK, is heavily controlled by the agencies. Having a universal CV/Resume means that when an agent calls me with a potential contract and I want to be put forward, as long as the agent has a recent copy in front of him I don't need to do anything. Alternatively if time is short and I need to get a CV to an agent by a set time then I don't have to think about it. I can spend 2 minutes firing an email off and then get back to whatever I was doing before.

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258955

    Samuel Vella (7/19/2012)


    With regards to the relevancy and a "catch all" resume..

    I've been using a catch all for the past 6 years as a contractor and I've never been out of work more than a couple of weeks. I'm currently on contract number 9 and will be looking for my 10th soon.

    Instead of paring the resume down to what the job is asking for, I've trimmed it down to what I want to do. Relevancy isn't just for the employer!

    The IT job market, especially in the UK, is heavily controlled by the agencies. Having a universal CV/Resume means that when an agent calls me with a potential contract and I want to be put forward, as long as the agent has a recent copy in front of him I don't need to do anything. Alternatively if time is short and I need to get a CV to an agent by a set time then I don't have to think about it. I can spend 2 minutes firing an email off and then get back to whatever I was doing before.

    I'm thinking what John meant was that it's for example not necessary to put "I've done some PHP development in college" on your resume when you're applying for a SQL Server DBA job 10 years later.

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  • Samuel Vella

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 8055

    Koen Verbeeck (7/19/2012)


    I'm thinking what John meant was that it's for example not necessary to put "I've done some PHP development in college" on your resume when you're applying for a SQL Server DBA job 10 years later.

    Thats for John to clarify for you but personally I think you're reading more into it than what he says. Pruning out old data is different from filtering out current data for relevancy.

    I've got a bunch of core skills on my CV only 3 or 4 of them will be relevant to any role.

  • Tobar

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4767

    IMHO

    I think it is different for contractors. Headhunters aren't reading any of your resume until their search engine makes a hit on its criteria. Then they will actually put an eyeball on your resume, but, I've been told, then they will only look at the last 5 years of info. I have also been told by headhunters that a 10 page resume, for a contractor, is the upper limit. Other than that the " readable, enjoyable, accurate ..." rules all apply.

    <><
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  • John.Sansom

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    Hi Samuel thanks for your comments.

    If you are totally satisfied with the results of your current strategy, that’s great! Don’t change a thing. It’s important to follow what works for you.

    I've been using a catch all for the past 6 years as a contractor and I've never been out of work more than a couple of weeks. I'm currently on contract number 9 and will be looking for my 10th soon.

    The contractor and permanent markets are indeed different to one another and do warrant adjustments to a job hunting strategy to reflect this.

    Instead of paring the resume down to what the job is asking for, I've trimmed it down to what I want to do. Relevancy isn't just for the employer!

    That’s a good mindset sir. Ideally of course, what you want to do and what the employer is asking for should be one and the same.

    The IT job market, especially in the UK, is heavily controlled by the agencies. Having a universal CV/Resume means that when an agent calls me with a potential contract and I want to be put forward, as long as the agent has a recent copy in front of him I don't need to do anything. Alternatively if time is short and I need to get a CV to an agent by a set time then I don't have to think about it. I can spend 2 minutes firing an email off and then get back to whatever I was doing before.

    Very true, the agencies are a key factor in the UK market. They can spot a great candidate a mile off because their CV stands out (for all the right reasons) amongst a pile of catch all resumes.

    Contrary to your own apparent success, perhaps consider why play a numbers game, taking the unnecessary risk of being overlooked, when a targeted resume will consistently come out on top.

    In my own experience, both as a candidate and a hiring manager, I have found that the additional effort spent on a resume is always a worthwhile investment.

    Great comments! Thanks for sharing.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

  • John.Sansom

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7335

    Koen Verbeeck (7/19/2012)


    Samuel Vella (7/19/2012)


    With regards to the relevancy and a "catch all" resume..

    I've been using a catch all for the past 6 years as a contractor and I've never been out of work more than a couple of weeks. I'm currently on contract number 9 and will be looking for my 10th soon.

    Instead of paring the resume down to what the job is asking for, I've trimmed it down to what I want to do. Relevancy isn't just for the employer!

    The IT job market, especially in the UK, is heavily controlled by the agencies. Having a universal CV/Resume means that when an agent calls me with a potential contract and I want to be put forward, as long as the agent has a recent copy in front of him I don't need to do anything. Alternatively if time is short and I need to get a CV to an agent by a set time then I don't have to think about it. I can spend 2 minutes firing an email off and then get back to whatever I was doing before.

    I'm thinking what John meant was that it's for example not necessary to put "I've done some PHP development in college" on your resume when you're applying for a SQL Server DBA job 10 years later.

    Koen, quite right sir. I may not have said so explicitly but this is indeed a theme that I wanted to communicate.


    John Sansom (@sqlBrit) | www.johnsansom.com

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