Getting Started Remotely

  • I would say; take the time to learn what your employer does. Many of us in IT work in the IT department of companies whose business is something else entirely. Talk to people outside the IT department to find out what their job entails and how IT fits into it. These people are your clients and the applications you build are supposed to make their day-to-day work easier.

  • Would I have listened to my older self when I was young?  It takes a certain maturity to listen.

    I'd agree with Chris.  Tech comes and goes but people skills never go out of fashion.

     

  • In addition to what Chris mention, technical people should always try to talk in a language that non-technical people can understand.  Non-technical people get confused and intimidated when technical people use very technical terms that they don't understand.  That often makes them feel uncomfortable coming to a person if they have a problem or they agree to something that's not exactly what they're wanting because they're afraid of speaking up or afraid of looking foolish because they don't know what you're talking about but "it sounds good."  Make sure you're watching facial expressions, etc. and if you think you've "lost them," acknowledge it, pause, and rethink how you can explain it and ask them to let you know where you lost them.

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