Falling Over our Assumptions

  • "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication"  Leonardo da Vinci.

    Rick

    I may not be good, but I'm slow.

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

  • How about "non-structured data"?

    If you think about it...

    _____________
    Code for TallyGenerator

  • I read two pages of this thread, nodding my head in agreement, before I realized it was over ten years old.

    To this day I still find programmers who are unable to answer a simple question: "Why are you doing it this way?"

  • As I was reading this editorial I found myself nodding in agreement again and again, and at the end find it is another gem from Mr. Factor.  Our team is in the midst of a very large project, and I find myself increasingly using this approach, paradoxically perhaps because we are pressed for time.  It is granular, ensures the logic is easy for another person to follow, and I am 'certain' is pretty much just as fast as anything I might write if I had more time to burn.

  • From Donald Knuth & Sir Tony Hoare:

    Computer Programming as an Art (1974)

    1974 Turing Award Lecture, Communications of the ACM 17 (12), (December 1974), pp. 667–673

    The real problem is that programmers have spent far too much time worrying about efficiency in the wrong places and at the wrong times; premature optimization is the root of all evil (or at least most of it) in programming.p. 671

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    How to Post to get the most: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/

  • LinksUp wrote:

    From Donald Knuth & Sir Tony Hoare:

    Computer Programming as an Art (1974)

    1974 Turing Award Lecture, Communications of the ACM 17 (12), (December 1974), pp. 667–673

    The real problem is that programmers have spent far too much time worrying about efficiency in the wrong places and at the wrong times; premature optimization is the root of all evil (or at least most of it) in programming.p. 671

    First rule of a skilled programmer is to start THINKING long before you start to write code.  Optimization is so much simpler and quicker if done BEFORE coding.

    Rick

    I may not be good, but I'm slow.

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

  • LinksUp wrote:

    From Donald Knuth & Sir Tony Hoare:

    Computer Programming as an Art (1974)

    1974 Turing Award Lecture, Communications of the ACM 17 (12), (December 1974), pp. 667–673

    The real problem is that programmers have spent far too much time worrying about efficiency in the wrong places and at the wrong times; premature optimization is the root of all evil (or at least most of it) in programming.p. 671

    While I agree with Knuth's parable, I think that too many people have misunderstood it.  It does NOT mean that you don't have to concern yourself with efficiencies or doing things the right way.  For example, creating tables with NVARCHAR(256) or NUMERIC(18,0) for all the column is a very bad thing.  Don't confuse "premature optimization" with meaning that you don't have to concern yourself with doing things the right way.

    As I tell people, if premature optimization is the root of all evil, what is the result of "no optimization"?

    We all know the answer to that question. 😉

    If it's worth doing, do it right.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

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