Education to solve the tech skills shortage

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Education to solve the tech skills shortage

  • Talent is always there and never hard to find!  The problem is employers not wanting to pay for that talent! Yes thats great to offer training to those who cant afford it, and offering a better salary is great too.  However, you are still not paying what they are truly worth rather paying what seems great to them.   When you barley make minimum wage and suddenly you are making double thats amazing, its not until you realize that those that have the skills are making double that and refuse to settle for lower wages meant for outsourced or h1-b resources.

  • mcdba2000-762400 wrote:

    Talent is always there and never hard to find!  The problem is employers not wanting to pay for that talent! Yes thats great to offer training to those who cant afford it, and offering a better salary is great too.  However, you are still not paying what they are truly worth rather paying what seems great to them.   When you barley make minimum wage and suddenly you are making double thats amazing, its not until you realize that those that have the skills are making double that and refuse to settle for lower wages meant for outsourced or h1-b resources.

    Well, there are more ways of seeing this.  True that talent is always there, but in fact it CAN BE and usually IS hard to find.  In my  years as a manager I hired a number of developers, several of whom had come from a local technical college.  I can attest that their skill levels were all over the board both technical and non-technical.  Unfortunately the employer often can't determine this from a resume and a couple interviews.   There were even a couple times I had to dismiss a new employee who simply couldn't measure up.   There is often a large difference between interviewing skills and technical skills., and inter-personal skills.

    I'm all for giving folks opportunities to succeed, but the approach of 'teaching coding' is concerning.  There is a huge difference between a 'coder' and a 'developer' or a DBA.

    Another thing I will add here is that usually experience is more critical than education, and you don't usually start at higher salaries without it.  You earn it.

    Believe me, it is far more pleasant to be able to promote and/or give raises to an employee than to have to dismiss one.   Never assume that just because you acquire a position that you are going to be able to maintain it.

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by  skeleton567.
    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by  skeleton567. Reason: typos, grammar
    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by  skeleton567.

    Rick

    One of the best days of my IT career was they day I told my boss if the problem was so simple he should go fix it himself.

  • Thanks for teaching at LaunchCode and to the students there, be sure to thank Kathi for her time and excellent knowledge.

  • Kathi, what you're doing at LaunchCode is great! I can understand your desire to work there. I wish something like this had been around when I started out in tech.

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • Just to clarify, I don't work for LaunchCode, I'm a volunteer.

     

    Thanks,

    Kathi

  • Thanks for voluntering. It's certainly helpful to make the skills more popular.

    At Belgium we have coderdojo's to learn children to create websites, games, ... in the hope they will use it in the future.

  • Kathi Kellenberger wrote:

    Just to clarify, I don't work for LaunchCode, I'm a volunteer.

    Thanks,

    Kathi

    Right. Sorry I didn't express it that way.

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • Really nice thing you're doing, Kathi. Teach a man or a woman to fish, or code...

    Trying to figure out the world of SQL as marketing consultant for SQL Solutions Group https://sqlsolutionsgroup.com/

  • mcdba2000-762400 wrote:

    Talent is always there and never hard to find!  The problem is employers not wanting to pay for that talent! Yes thats great to offer training to those who cant afford it, and offering a better salary is great too.  However, you are still not paying what they are truly worth rather paying what seems great to them.   When you barley make minimum wage and suddenly you are making double thats amazing, its not until you realize that those that have the skills are making double that and refuse to settle for lower wages meant for outsourced or h1-b resources.

    That's true in many situations, but LaunchCode is changing the trajectory for these folks. Without it, many of them would be stuck in minimum wage jobs for the rest of their lives. I know several LC graduates who not only doubled their salary but went on to get promotions and 6-figure salaries.

  • SQL Server has been very very good to me.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

  • Eric M Russell wrote:

    SQL Server has been very very good to me.

     

    Eric, I heartily agree with you on this.  Looking back in my computer data it appears that my first employment involving SQL Server began about 1998, before which I had worked with DMSII and Ingres (the worst one I ever used).

    With SQL Server I was able to open the door to several opportunities that promoted my career.  Almost twelve years following retirement I'm still using it for personal stuff and still learning how to do new things.

    Rick

    One of the best days of my IT career was they day I told my boss if the problem was so simple he should go fix it himself.

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