Basic

  • Richard M.

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7288

    Lynn Pettis (8/6/2010)


    Richard M. (8/6/2010)


    I always chuckle when Wikipedia is cited as a reference. Wkipedia, although a nice place to look up stuff (you basically find anything you are looking for), is not always a reliable source, in fact, it is prohibited to be used as a reference in colleges and some schools.

    Not to say that the information provided is not correct. There's plenty of instances where you find proper source citation to make it perfectly valid and reliable.

    This just reminds me of a Dilbert strip[/url] 🙂

    My daughters can't use Wikipedia as a source in their schools, but I tell them it can still be a starting point leading you to more reliable sources that can be used.

    Exactly my point. At least it can give you some idea on how to deepen the search and in some cases also following some sources is helpful 😉

    _______________________________________________________________________
    For better assistance in answering your questions, click here[/url]

  • Nadrek

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 20039

    For anyone that says Unicode, I ask, which one?

    UTF-8

    UTF-16 (BE by default)

    UTF-16BE

    UTF-16LE

    UTF-32 (BE by default)

    UTF-32BE

    UTF-32LE

    Or, perhaps, late 90's (very archaic) implementations like UCS-2 (used in SQL Server as 'Unicode')?

  • honza.mf

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5519

    Nadrek (8/9/2010)


    For anyone that says Unicode, I ask, which one?

    UTF-8

    UTF-16 (BE by default)

    UTF-16BE

    UTF-16LE

    UTF-32 (BE by default)

    UTF-32BE

    UTF-32LE

    Or, perhaps, late 90's (very archaic) implementations like UCS-2 (used in SQL Server as 'Unicode')?

    Does it matter?

    For me UTF-16, any endian. Or any other, distinguished by BOM.



    See, understand, learn, try, use efficient
    © Dr.Plch

  • David Conn

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5543

    Have only just got to this question.

    My thoughts: How do you measure "Most Common" ?

    Is it how may many Computers use it ? Probably ASCII because of the PC.

    Is it how much Data is stored in the Format ? How do you measure the enormous amount of data on IBM Mainframes stored in EBCDIC ?

    Is Unicode that Popular ? I usually avoid it where possible in favour of 8 bit ASCII.

  • Dietmar Weickert

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2258

    Oh what a shortsighted question! 🙁

    ASCII is a US only standard, hardly usable anywhere else. Ever thought about Europe? Do you really think the French, German, Scandinavian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Polish, Baltic, Rumanian, Hungarian, Finish, Spanish, Portuguese people could do anything with their computers if they just used ASCII? And they have at least the Latin alphabet!

    So what about the several hundred millions of people with Cyrillic alphabet? Do you really think they could use their computers if they had ASCII as the only foundation for coding their text data? And how about Asia? China probably outnumbers both all ASCII users and ASCII data volumes used anywhere in the world, and the Japanese numbers are amazing as well.

    Both ASCII and EBCDIC are foundations for better systems at best. The first try was the ISO 8859 family of character sets; it still proofed to be insufficient. Meanwhile Unicode is there and becomes more and more mature. The fact that Microsoft (almost) fully supports Unicode in its modern Windows variants might make Unicode the character set used both by most users and for most data already. Of course you will find the 128 ASCII characters there as well - somewhere among the 100,000 others... 🙂

    Best regards,
    Dietmar Weickert.

  • TomThomson

    SSC Guru

    Points: 104772

    Mushana (8/6/2010)


    http://www.psexam.com/MCQ-Collection-for-Fundamentals-of-Computer/computer-fundamentals-objective-questions-mcq-with-solutions-set-5.html

    Not a reliable source - some of the answers are glaringly wrong. For example the first electronic computer was not Eniac, which came 29 months after Colossus Mk 1 (which was the first unless the Atanasoff-Berry device, which was a few years earlier yet, counts as a computer). Or if "electronic computer" means a stored-program device, Eniac wasn't an electronic computer at all and the first one was the Manchester Baby.

    Tom

  • TomThomson

    SSC Guru

    Points: 104772

    honza.mf (8/6/2010)


    ASCII, ANSI, EBCDIC are out of date. Unicode rulez 😀

    True.

    With the number ofcountries that have languages which don't use the Roman alphabet (for example Greece, Russia, India, China, Japan,...) or use an extended Roman alphabet with some characters that have no ASCII representation (for example Ireland, Wales, France, Norway...) it's clear that not as many systems use ASCII as the questioner appears to think (even this website uses UTF-8, not ASCII) and quite possible that more sysems use Unicode than use ASCII.

    But it would be hard to choose the wrong answer given the options provided.

    Tom

  • zymos

    SSCommitted

    Points: 1960

    Nice question and takes us back to basics. Thanks.

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