Administering Securely

  • rboggess (8/11/2009)


    I ran into this article (http://www.net-security.org/secworld.php?id=7690) and immediately recognized the potential applications here. Thought other readers might find this interesting.

    Thanks for posting another IBM plan to get a frivolous computer science patent I have found many existing Ideal Lattice works including one in Cambridge going back to 1996. This is math the US Government needs to let the math world review the IBM intern's work that will include the Canadians, Russians, English and others who were doing the work before IBM. I still waiting for someone to tell me how IBM was issued a patent on RDBMS localization on the Microsoft platform I do that in my sleep.

    http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=1536414.1536440

    http://eprint.iacr.org/2007/322

    http://www.mathnet.ru/php/archive.phtml?wshow=paper&jrnid=fpm&paperid=549&option_lang=eng

    http://www.springerlink.com/content/j00273645up627x1/

    Kind regards,
    Gift Peddie

  • rboggess (8/11/2009)


    I ran into this article (http://www.net-security.org/secworld.php?id=7690) and immediately recognized the potential applications here. Thought other readers might find this interesting.

    Oh, please! This solves the wrong problem. Suppose the rogue admin maybe wants to know who is paid more than him - well, if the encryption is a homomorphism the less than relationship (and the equals relationship) on salaries is preserved by the encryption (actually the equals relationship is preserved by any encryption where both the key and the seed is independent of the rest of the data in the row - something that people thinking of encrypting things like salaries, bonuses, tax codes, and so on usually forget even though "X is paid exactly the same as Y" may be information that shouldn't be freely available).

    Anyway, homomorphic encryption is old had - people have been working on this for a very long time (since about 1960 at GCHQ I think, but of course none of that was published, certainly since the 70s at MIT) and there are partial results all over the place. If someone has come up with a workable and secure algorithm that's a nice piece of mathematics and it may even be useful in some contexts, but it's not really interesting so far as concealing information from the dba is concerned because it still reveals too much.

    Tom

  • Anyway, homomorphic encryption is old had - people have been working on this for a very long time (since about 1960 at GCHQ I think, but of course none of that was published, certainly since the 70s at MIT) and there are partial results all over the place. If someone has come up with a workable and secure algorithm that's a nice piece of mathematics and it may even be useful in some contexts, but it's not really interesting so far as concealing information from the dba is concerned because it still reveals too much.

    These are some of the reasons I want us to start the personal data SET algebra required movement.

    😎

    Kind regards,
    Gift Peddie

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