T-SQL Tuesday #124 – Query Store Summary

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T-SQL Tuesday

Happy St. Patrick’s Day (are you wearing something green)!  For March I asked everyone to blog something related to Query Store, here is a summary of in alphabetical order of the blog posts we received although Rob Farley gets credit for being first.

  • Tracy Boggiano (b | t) – I wrote a short post on the performance counters available to monitor the impact of using Query Store is having on your CPU and I/O.  I also update the dashboard in GitHub if you are using the Telgraf solution that I present on.
  • Jason Brimhall (b | t) – Jason gives us trick question to start off his blog and starts telling us about Extended Events.  He gives a detailed example on how to capture the clear all process for Query Store, then a much larger Extended Event to capture all queries Query Store runs behind the scenes.  I’m looking forward to playing with this.
  • Kevin Chant (b | t) – Kevin tells us how he turned on Query Store after using in a few places and seeing its benefits.  Then he educated his team on how to use the reports.  He also warns to check out the best practices.  Then he points out that isn’t not available below 2016 so you can look at Open Query Store on GitHub (after all Query Store is forcing plan guides in the background, hint hint for what you can do on the systems not running Query Store yet).
  • Rob Farley (b | t) – Rob was forced to by a new laptop and gasp install SSMS, his preference these days is Azure Data Studio.  You ask why he had to install SSMS, well the Query Store Reports are only in SSMS and not in ADS yet (we hope its a yet, should we page Vicky Harp from the Microsoft SQL Tools Team for this request?).  Check out what else he is choosing to install or not install on his machine to keep in lean and mean, and see how old his mouse is.
  • David Fowler (b | t) – David spins us a story of spinlocks taking the CPU to 100% due to Query Store and how he diagnosed the problem to determine it was due to Query Store.  He also points out the Service Pack and CU that the issue was resolved in.
  • Andy Levy (b | t) – Andy wasn’t going to blog until he actually had to force a plan this week (ha ha) and walks us through his process of troubleshooting the issue and what is ultimate solution will be.
  • Deborah Melkin (b | t) – Deb just turned Query Store on in test LAST WEEK! I have good timing.  She is just getting starting and looking forward to reading these blog posts for other tidbits to get her going on her adventure.  Deb there is a book if you want to read it, just kidding.
  • Erin Stellato (b | t) – Erin got really excited when she seen the invite, because besides me no one else gets as excited about Query Store.  Erin tells us tales of how customers have successfully and failed at adopting Query Store.  Yikes 100 GB QDSs and ad-hoc workloads which ones work and don’t work for adoption and why, you will have to read to her blog to find out.  Then she tells about how the 2019 features of Query Store can help you.
  • John Sterrett (b | t) – John talks about using Query Store to compare workload replays using features we probably haven’t yet (Database Experimentation Assistant (DEA)Distributed Replay, or other process to replay the workload).  Then he creates two schemas to compare the workloads and provides all the queries.  So this is an interesting way to compare performance on two workloads.
  • Mark Wilkinson (b | t) – Mark tells about running Query Store in large production environment starting with a CTP version of SQL Server 2016.  He tells a story from two prescriptive the developer and the administrators experience with Query Store.  You need to read the blog to see how has the best experience using it.  Full disclosure I used to work with Mark during most of the issues he discusses and they were just as much fun as they sounded from the administrator view point or as I call it the good old days.

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