Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Houston, we have a problem


Houston, we have a problem

Author
Message
Phil Factor
Phil Factor
Right there with Babe
Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 739 Visits: 2937
Relational databases aren't supposed to be "simple" minded;

The overwhelming cost of a database application usually turns out to be the cost of training, the cost of integrating the data with the rest of the enterprise, and the cost of maintaining the system. Saving the cost of the actual database system turns out to be an irrelevance. Some of the most expensive database systems I've come across have been intended as the 'cheapest'. There are good reasons for choosing a Cloud solution but saving costs isn't necessarily one of them


Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
P Jones
P Jones
Say Hey Kid
Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)Say Hey Kid (682 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 682 Visits: 1503
Microsoft ruined their one decent database design tool when they bought out Visio - it was great before they got their mitts on it especially for object role modelling design and then they seemed to deprecate this and removed the "create database from model" facility. I still have Visio 2000 around because it worked.
calspot
calspot
SSC-Enthusiastic
SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (107 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 107 Visits: 28
< sigh > I miss create from model....



Michael Valentine Jones
Michael Valentine Jones
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.3K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 3252 Visits: 11771
rbalmf (8/1/2010)
Sure, we've invested so much money and 10 hard years learning this stuff that we just have to use it right?

You're entitled to your opinion of course, strange COBOL analogy notwithstanding, but if you look at the rise of cloud environments more widely you will see that there is a shift happening towards simpler storage models (BigTables, Azure Tables etc.) because they scale more easily and don't require DB Ninjutsus to get the best out of them.

I'm sure there will still be a place for you Old-Skool data guys but that place will be within the cloud, maintaining the platform, not developing software.

And I for one will be glad. Smile



Nice troll, I give it an 8.
RobertYoung
RobertYoung
SSC-Enthusiastic
SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)SSC-Enthusiastic (100 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 100 Visits: 232
Phil Factor (8/2/2010)
Relational databases aren't supposed to be "simple" minded;

The overwhelming cost of a database application usually turns out to be the cost of training, the cost of integrating the data with the rest of the enterprise, and the cost of maintaining the system.


(This thread did a Lazarus today, so I'll contribute again.) That's the latest craze, Enterprise Master Data Management. Pays real good, too; from what I hear.
gavwat
gavwat
Grasshopper
Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)Grasshopper (12 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 12 Visits: 77
The SQL Server Modeling technologies, presently in CTP, aim to provide significant productivity gains across the lifecycle of .NET applications by enabling developers, architects, and IT professionals to work together more effectively
The complete set of documentation for the SQL Server Modeling CTP including overviews, tutorials, and technical references for each component technology.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709420.aspx
Phil Factor
Phil Factor
Right there with Babe
Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)Right there with Babe (739 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 739 Visits: 2937
The SQL Server Modeling technologies, presently in CTP, aim to provide significant productivity gains across the lifecycle of .NET applications by enabling developers, architects, and IT professionals to work together more effectively
The complete set of documentation for the SQL Server Modeling CTP including overviews, tutorials, and technical references for each component technology.


I'd have a good look at the following article before getting too excited by the CTP. Another piece of Microsoft's Oslo modeling puzzle disappears (Mary Joe Foley) However, it is worth downloading it just to see what happened to poor Oslo. (warning: it expects a local installation of SQLExpress before it will work. It bombs out with an obscure error)

It is interesting to read this Microsoft's Distributed Destination: Oslo and this The Origins of Microsoft's Oslo Software Modeling Platform

Brad Lovering was quoted as saying at the time..
If you’re [a Microsoft] Access user, it will be more familiar to you, let me put it that way.
So, if you kind of think of Access, [Microsoft] Excel, ...” that is an approximation of the tool,
you have to be a little bit careful with that comparison because it could be misleading. I’m trying to give you sort of a general feeling of the center; it is not [Access and Excel], but those are the best approximations I have if you haven’t experienced the tool.
The tool enables users to capture domain knowledge in domain-specific views, And the tool also will be useful for more advanced diagramming, such as enabling the development of BPMN (business process modeling notification) workflows and UML (Unified Modeling Language) services.


Hmmm... Sort of a bit like Eclipse then?


Best wishes,

Phil Factor
Simple Talk
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search