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Good Enough


Good Enough

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Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Good Enough

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Henrico Bekker
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Hi Steve, I think "abandoning" VBS and PWS might be a bit harsh.
Moving on to new technologies is a definite yes, but still using your "legacy" knowledge is never a bad thing I reckon.

I say, whichever is quicker and more efficient to use, is usually the best way to go.

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Msg 8134, Level 16, State 1, Line 1
Divide by zero error encountered.
OCTom
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Ha. I still do things with good old DOS commands. Powershell is just a rehash of command line processing and scripting. Be it DOS and batch files, VBS, AS400, Unix/Linux, etc, command line processing has been a quick and easy way to get certain things done.

Learn Powershell... sure. But, don't think it's anything new. A command line based on .NET is going backward not forward.
Steve Jones
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Is it going backwards? I'm not sure about that. I think that PWS, and Python, are actually moving forward by bridging some of the programming concepts that were missing in DOS. It's more like making a korn or C-shell for the Windows world.

The big thing for me is that the tools have to be built in. When I'm recovering a server, or rebuilding one, I like having stuff built into the OS and stack. Or easily integrated into an install. PWS does this on newer systems, and as those become mainstream, it becomes more likely that PWS is available.

VBS works well for me, and the big reason I moved away from Perl is that I could always count on VBS being on every server.

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Trey Staker
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I jumped on the powershell bandwagon awhile ago but still go back to other tools (scripting languages). The way I look at it is that it is just another tool on my tool belt. Having more tools on the tool belt allows you to solve more problems or to look at it differently. "When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail."

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Grant Fritchey
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I'd say it's time to learn it. There is just so much capability built into it now from MS plugging it into every product they're turning out these days... It just seems crazy to not develop a good skill set in it.

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Frank W Fulton Jr
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Having been in the computer business for 30 some odd years, the only constant I have come across is that everything changes.

But, then again that is one of the things I love about it, there is always a new challenge.

For me that currently is VS2010 & .Net 4.0, with SQL 2008 R2 just around the corner, the fun never ends!
SQLRNNR
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It is nice to have some of the old stuff in the old toolbelt - sometimes that just isn't enough or the correct tool. Time to learn the new stuff and possibly become more efficient.



Jason AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
I have given a name to my pain...
MCM SQL Server, MVP


SQL RNNR

Posting Performance Based Questions - Gail Shaw

Jeff Moden
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In just about anything I've seen having to do with software, 99% of the people only know how to use 1% of the functionality. A lot of the new flash-in-the-pan software is to try to get the next generation to buy the latest version (gotta keep up with the Jones' :-P) with 1 or 2 "slick" things that can usually be done without the "slick" if you just take the time to learn it.

I've seen a whole lot of good functionality in SQL Server simply go away along with some of the good stuff they added... I wonder when they'll add some of it back in so you can buy a new version to get it and think its new and "slick".

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
Although they tell us that they want it real bad, our primary goal is to ensure that we dont actually give it to them that way.
Although change is inevitable, change for the better is not.
Just because you can do something in PowerShell, doesnt mean you should. Wink

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wldhrs
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Edited ... oops curly { on a url doesn't make it look like a url :-(

Jeff, you're sounding (reading?) almost as jaded as I am.

However, quoting from our esteemed editor where this list started, "I'd have to say that it's when you see a decent future in the new technology. When it appears that others have proven savings, like a task takes less time or you get better performance."

I'm not sure anyone could prove that that MVS wasn't just the coolest and fastest aproach to re-entrent program execution ever. But that just didn't cut the mustard 'cos MSFT had better marketing for a ***-awful OS and and compilers that worked most of the time.

In all my time with IBM systems I once found a genuine bug with the PL/I compiler.

And for those nerds, who had an anti-M$FT fixation then Linux was the coolest thing out, it just could never support as much hardware as MSFT could, ... oh, maybe that's why MSFT were charging for their products, 'cos they would actually run on just about any hardware on the planet .. well,well, never did think that was a problem until I bought a chinese knockoff of ...

Oops, off the subject. The best marketing wins, not the best technical solution.

I'm sort of hoping that .net (based around c# not vb or x#, he,he) and sql server are going to have the best marketing around 'cos I've sure as hell invested a lot of my life in what I consider a technically very good set of solutions, leaving aside some of the aberrations like asp.net mvc where a forced solution to bad programming has introduced some really weird results. Maybe not wrong, just weird.

And these solutions are evolving very quickly on both a technical language path and a hardware implementaion path, so let's be vveerryy careful about what we define as less time to get better performance.

How many times has everyone out there seen a solution that make the simple stuff simpler but the hard stuff harder.

http://www.artima.com/intv/simplexity.html

When you take something incredibly complex and try to wrap it in something simpler, you often just shroud the complexity. You don't actually design a truly simple system. And in some ways you make it even more complex, because now the user has to understand what was omitted that they might sometimes need. That's simplexity.

- Anders Hejlsberg, Lead C# architect

Peter Edmunds ex-Geek
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