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Converting Hour and Minute to Decimal


Converting Hour and Minute to Decimal

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Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
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Ed Wagner (7/31/2014)
It sounds to me like you're after the number of units picked per hour for a specific period of time. It reminds me of a shop floor productivity report. Is this correct? If so, simply subtract the times and divide the quantity by the difference. This example uses the difference in minutes for precision.

with times as (
select dateadd(minute, -90, getdate()) starting_time,
GETDATE() ending_time,
14 quantity
union all
select dateadd(hour, -2, getdate()) starting_time,
GETDATE() ending_time,
160 quantity)
select starting_time, ending_time, quantity,
convert(numeric(12, 6), DATEDIFF(minute, starting_time, ending_time)) / 60 hours,
round(quantity / convert(numeric(12, 6), DATEDIFF(minute, starting_time, ending_time)) * 60, 3) uph
from times;



Am I over-simplifying this?


No. But it can be made a bit simpler still using the hidden power of the DATETIME data type.


WITH TestData (StartDT,EndDT,Quantity) AS
(
SELECT DATEADD(mi,-90,GETDATE()), GETDATE(), 14 UNION ALL
SELECT DATEADD(hh,- 2,GETDATE()), GETDATE(), 160
)
SELECT StartDT
,EndDT
,Quantity
,UPH = CAST(Quantity/(CAST(EndDT-StartDT AS DECIMAL(17,12))%1*24) AS DECIMAL(9,3))
FROM TestData
;




--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
Although they tell us that they want it real bad, our primary goal is to ensure that we dont actually give it to them that way.
Although change is inevitable, change for the better is not.
Just because you can do something in PowerShell, doesnt mean you should. Wink

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Jeff Moden
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Eirikur Eiriksson (8/2/2014)
The datetime format is still the same upto and including 2014.
Cool


Thanks Eirikur. I've never looked at it but figured it might be so. That does, however, make my disappointment in the DATETIME2 data type even deeper. Except for the precision byte, it's virtually identical to DATETIME... why would they cripple the data type by making direct addition and subtraction impossible?

What adds to the disappointment is that the DATETIME2 data type, even when scaled back to DATETIME2(3) to produce the same number of digits (but, not the same accuracy) as DATETIME is 49% slower than when the same code is used for DATETIME. Yeah, it takes millions of rows for that to really add up but I have millions of rows that I work with.

The DATETIME2 solution that requires DATEPART is also 72% slower than DATETIME with the decimal conversion.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
Although they tell us that they want it real bad, our primary goal is to ensure that we dont actually give it to them that way.
Although change is inevitable, change for the better is not.
Just because you can do something in PowerShell, doesnt mean you should. Wink

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
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Group: General Forum Members
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For anyone that would like to do their own testing, here's the test table I've been using for all of this...


WITH cteRandomDT AS
(
SELECT TOP 1000000
DateTimeDT = RAND(CHECKSUM(NEWID())) * DATEDIFF(dd,'2000','2020') + CAST('2000' AS DATETIME)
FROM sys.all_columns ac1
CROSS JOIN sys.all_columns ac2
)
SELECT DateTimeDT
,DateTime2DT = CAST(DateTimeDT AS DATETIME2(3))
INTO #JBMTest
FROM cteRandomDT
;




--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
Although they tell us that they want it real bad, our primary goal is to ensure that we dont actually give it to them that way.
Although change is inevitable, change for the better is not.
Just because you can do something in PowerShell, doesnt mean you should. Wink

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Eirikur Eiriksson
Eirikur Eiriksson
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Points: 6762 Visits: 17733
Jeff Moden (8/2/2014)
Eirikur Eiriksson (8/2/2014)
The datetime format is still the same upto and including 2014.
Cool


Thanks Eirikur. I've never looked at it but figured it might be so. That does, however, make my disappointment in the DATETIME2 data type even deeper. Except for the precision byte, it's virtually identical to DATETIME... why would they cripple the data type by making direct addition and subtraction impossible?

What adds to the disappointment is that the DATETIME2 data type, even when scaled back to DATETIME2(3) to produce the same number of digits (but, not the same accuracy) as DATETIME is 49% slower than when the same code is used for DATETIME. Yeah, it takes millions of rows for that to really add up but I have millions of rows that I work with.

The DATETIME2 solution that requires DATEPART is also 72% slower than DATETIME with the decimal conversion.


I agree, as anything that sounds too good to be true, datetime2 isn't. Although it saves 3 bytes and it's ansi/ iso compliant, honestly, no improvement over smalldatetime though, same number of bytes and realistically, unless one is doing far fetched statistics, the range of smalldatetime is more than enough.
Cool
Go


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