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Convert Bigint time to datetime


Convert Bigint time to datetime

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PSB
PSB
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SELECT DATEADD(hh,-5,dateadd(s, convert(bigint, 1397750400000) / 1000, convert(datetime, '1-1-1970 00:00:00')))

worked for me!
Lynn Pettis
Lynn Pettis
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PSB (4/17/2014)

SELECT DATEADD(hh,-5,dateadd(s, convert(bigint, 1397750400000) / 1000, convert(datetime, '1-1-1970 00:00:00')))

worked for me!


So the BIGINT value was actually milliseconds since midnight 1970-01-01, not minutes. Good to know.

Cool
Lynn Pettis

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Something to consider:


select datediff(m, '0001-01-01', '9999-12-31')



returns 119987

That is the largest difference in minutes between the earliest and latest dates handled by SQL Server. The earliest date it can store is Jan 1 1753, IIRC.

Is 1397750400000 the minute of the Big Bang or something like that?
Jack Corbett
  Jack Corbett
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gbritton1 (4/17/2014)
Something to consider:


select datediff(m, '0001-01-01', '9999-12-31')



returns 119987

That is the largest difference in minutes between the earliest and latest dates handled by SQL Server. The earliest date it can store is Jan 1 1753, IIRC.

Is 1397750400000 the minute of the Big Bang or something like that?


the "m" is MONTH not minute, the shorthand for minute is mi or n. That's why I always spell out the full identifier: MONTH, YEAR, DAY, MINUTE, HOUR, SECOND, MILLISECOND instead of the abbreviation.



Jack Corbett

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Sorry, you're quite right! That should be:


declare @maxminutes bigint = datediff(day, '0001-01-01', '9999-12-31')*cast(24*60 as bigint)
select @maxminutes



which yields: 5258963520
Eirikur Eiriksson
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PSB (4/17/2014)
Minutes


1397750400000 Minutes
23295840000 Hours
970660000 Days
2657522 Years


The first birthday of Homo habilis?
Cool
Lynn Pettis
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Eirikur Eiriksson (4/20/2014)
PSB (4/17/2014)
Minutes


1397750400000 Minutes
23295840000 Hours
970660000 Days
2657522 Years


The first birthday of Homo habilis?
Cool


Actually, it was milliseconds. ;-)

Cool
Lynn Pettis

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For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
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gbritton1 (4/17/2014)
Just do it in a loop, ...


I hope your not serious. Let's see the code that does it in a loop.

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Jack Corbett (4/17/2014)
gbritton1 (4/17/2014)
Something to consider:


select datediff(m, '0001-01-01', '9999-12-31')



returns 119987

That is the largest difference in minutes between the earliest and latest dates handled by SQL Server. The earliest date it can store is Jan 1 1753, IIRC.

Is 1397750400000 the minute of the Big Bang or something like that?


the "m" is MONTH not minute, the shorthand for minute is mi or n. That's why I always spell out the full identifier: MONTH, YEAR, DAY, MINUTE, HOUR, SECOND, MILLISECOND instead of the abbreviation.


Heh... oddly enough, that's why I use the 2 character abbreviations for dateparts.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
Although they tell us that they want it real bad, our primary goal is to ensure that we dont actually give it to them that way.
Although change is inevitable, change for the better is not.
Just because you can do something in PowerShell, doesnt mean you should. Wink

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
PSB
PSB
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I have a couple of 14 digit int time in my table

SELECT DATEADD(hh,-5,dateadd(s, convert(bigint, 61353491400000) / 1000, convert(datetime, '1-1-1970 00:00:00')))

The above query throws an error :

Arithmetic overflow error converting expression to data type int.

Please advise how di I resolve it.

Thanks,
PSB
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