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Impressive Accomplishments


Impressive Accomplishments

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Steve Jones
Steve Jones
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Impressive Accomplishments

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jhgoodwin
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It is difficult to stand out in resume form.

I think the simplest way to think about it is that your resume isn't simply a checkmark task. It is a marketing product. As such, it should do the best job possible of accomplishing it's job - getting you an in person interview. Spell check it, check your margins, make sure the order makes sense, look for competing ones you like, and copy the elements you like, so on.

That said, DO NOT RELY on your written resume to get contacted. Network like crazy through every option you have available. Any application you fill out online, follow up on them. Do not make the mistake of thinking "the system" will work for you. Assume you will have to go out and beat the bushes yourself to get that job. At least then you won't be disappointed.

For those who stand out in person, that's easy. Don't show up looking/acting like a 9-5'er putting on his blowhard hat just long enough to pass the interview stage and get the job. Come seeking to pull more than your weight. Come expecting to do important work that changes the planet. Ask where the hard problems are, so *you* can contribute on them. Show up looking like a winner, talking like a winner, and most importantly, working like a winner. To do that, you need to practice being a winner in all aspects of your life.

Simply put, a winner is someone who focuses on objectives, and conquers them consistently.

Also, for heaven's sake, don't try to multitask during the interview, either. Turn off your stinking phone. It won't kill you to stop looking at it for a few hours.

As a side note:
One question interviewers sometimes ask towards the end of the meeting, which is not really out of line, is to tell them about myself, and my experience. Having worked 15 years, 60-80 hours a week most weeks doing active work, study, side work, or personal projects, it's quite an onion to peel in the last 5 minutes of an interview.

To be honest, I'm not really sure what's best in this particular scenario.

When I do technical interviews, I ask more and more detailed questions until I get vague answers. I use that as my guide to know when the person interviewed has met their depth.

If you are interviewing someone else, don't make the mistake of letting the interviewee talk endlessly about their past conquests. Ask specific directed questions about things you think they should know. If you can afford the time, put them to work, and shoulder surf their quality of work.

There are lots of people out there who could do an average job. I don't care to work with them. Why should you? Be among the best, and demand those around you to be likewise.

That's my two cents on the subject.
Gary Varga
Gary Varga
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1) I like it when candidates show an interest in the less glamourous but more worthy aspects of the role e.g. developers who are interested in a rigorous software development life cycle (SDLC) - by this I mean they see testing as a key responsibility that THEY see as part of their work not something forced on them.

2) Candidates who are more interested in the role than the interviewer is with filling it. I find that if I have more enthusiasm to get that candidate into the job than the candidate has in coming to do they job then they don't want it enough.

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Bryant McClellan
Bryant McClellan
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I usually end up doing the technical dirty work in interviews, asking the probing questions to figure out if they candidate actually knows SQL Server or has just read something about it. Having used SQL Server since v4.2, I guess I know why I get that role.

I have found 2 things that impress me and show that there is more going on than the CV implies. The first is that the candidate is familiar with order of execution. If they have gone to that amount of trouble to learn internals then they are probably capable of learning whatever is necessary and have the desire to do so.

The other one is when they don't know the answer to a question and ask for a reference beyond BOL to research the answer themselves. That may not get them hired, but it will make them better in their current job and in a future one. The desire to push the bounds of their knowledge makes them valuable today and tomorrow.

------------
Buy the ticket, take the ride. -- Hunter S. Thompson
OCTom
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G Bryant McClellan (2/15/2013)
I usually end up doing the technical dirty work in interviews, asking the probing questions to figure out if they candidate actually knows SQL Server or has just read something about it. Having used SQL Server since v4.2, I guess I know why I get that role.

I have found 2 things that impress me and show that there is more going on than the CV implies. The first is that the candidate is familiar with order of execution. If they have gone to that amount of trouble to learn internals then they are probably capable of learning whatever is necessary and have the desire to do so.

The other one is when they don't know the answer to a question and ask for a reference beyond BOL to research the answer themselves. That may not get them hired, but it will make them better in their current job and in a future one. The desire to push the bounds of their knowledge makes them valuable today and tomorrow.


I'm curious as to what would be a reference beyond BOL? SCC for example or are you thinking something else?
jgoodwin 14842
jgoodwin 14842
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A few that come to mind:

1) Other books from various authors
2) video training
3) peers
4) online forums
5) self study/your own notes/your own work
6) sample code
7) books on other database systems ( for example Oracle has some nice DB tuning/perf guides which do crossover to SQL Server)
TravisDBA
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What impresses me most about a candidate is not always on their resume. Once, a number of years ago I was interviewing someone and it came to the part of the interview where I get to find out a little about them and their outside interests. This one candidate said that he did alot of charity work, and volunteering. Particulalrly, with wounded veterans. That impressed me because it immediately showed me that:

1. They freely help others
2. They care about something other than themselves.
3. They love their country.

Those traits are so rare today. So many people disrespecting and bad-mouthing our country today and only out for themselves here. Well, anyway he got hired. I actually went with him a couple of times after that to the veterans hospitals. Man, it broke my heart to see people who have given just about everything for their country and the conditions they were in at that hospital.

"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ...:-D"
Abu Dina
Abu Dina
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TravisDBA (2/15/2013)
That is so rare today, with so many people disrespecting and bad-mouthing our country today, and only out for themselves here. Well, anyway he got hired.


Overdosing on patriotism can be dangerous.

---------------------------------------------------------


It takes a minimal capacity for rational thought to see that the corporate 'free press' is a structurally irrational and biased, and extremely violent, system of elite propaganda.
David Edwards - Media lens

Society has varying and conflicting interests; what is called objectivity is the disguise of one of these interests - that of neutrality. But neutrality is a fiction in an unneutral world. There are victims, there are executioners, and there are bystanders... and the 'objectivity' of the bystander calls for inaction while other heads fall.
Howard Zinn
TravisDBA
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Abu Dina (2/15/2013)
TravisDBA (2/15/2013)
That is so rare today, with so many people disrespecting and bad-mouthing our country today, and only out for themselves here. Well, anyway he got hired.


Overdosing on patriotism can be dangerous.


For your information Einstein, patriotism is what founded and forged this country with the precious blood of those patriots through several trying times....You should go to Arlington sometime if you doubt that in any way.:-D

"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ...:-D"
Abu Dina
Abu Dina
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TravisDBA (2/15/2013)
Abu Dina (2/15/2013)
TravisDBA (2/15/2013)
That is so rare today, with so many people disrespecting and bad-mouthing our country today, and only out for themselves here. Well, anyway he got hired.


Overdosing on patriotism can be dangerous.


For your information Einstein, patriotism is what founded and forged this country with the precious blood of those patriots through several trying times....:-D


Ooops touched a raw nerve did I?! :-P

An anarchist vs. a patriot BWAHAHAHA how is that for Friday afternoon entertainment?!

Naaaaaa.......back on topic.

---------------------------------------------------------


It takes a minimal capacity for rational thought to see that the corporate 'free press' is a structurally irrational and biased, and extremely violent, system of elite propaganda.
David Edwards - Media lens

Society has varying and conflicting interests; what is called objectivity is the disguise of one of these interests - that of neutrality. But neutrality is a fiction in an unneutral world. There are victims, there are executioners, and there are bystanders... and the 'objectivity' of the bystander calls for inaction while other heads fall.
Howard Zinn
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