SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Lessons for all of us


Lessons for all of us

Author
Message
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)SSC Guru (610K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 610956 Visits: 21175
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Lessons for all of us

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Andy Robertson
Andy Robertson
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.5K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 3496 Visits: 632

I disagree about working to live. I live to work, whether that's working for money or working on my house. I like to work hard and then when I sit down I can relax knowing I've put a shift in. If I don't work then I can't relax. It's that simple for me.


Dalkeith
Dalkeith
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)SSCrazy (2.9K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2921 Visits: 1393
I kind of agree with both yourself and Andy. Work is important because it is growth and there is nothing not even family without growth and invention but... sometimes the best way to get more productive is to take breaks you may in the short term be more productive by putting in ten hour shifts but keep that up for a couple of years and your heading for an early grave.

I had a stressful year last year at the same time I
Moved house and
conducted two big ETL projects : those kind of projects where you know if it goes well no one will notice but if it goes badly people might be out of a job.

I worked harder than was good for me in the belief that I would be able to take it easier this year. I have been and the hard work has benefited me this year despite the fact that I am not working as hard now.

I think it is a good idea to try and keep fit so you can literally work harder or at least it helps me cope with stress.

I try to
Not eat till I am 100% full - when I got married my diet significantly improved but the amount I ate dramatically increased. I managed to get my wife to accept that I didn't need quite as much as I was being given!
Regularly run short distances - typically 5km twice a week with one swim. My wife likes walking and I get out 4 or 5 times with her but I really need the runs as the walks don't loosen me off enough.

Its a balancing act that I get right some years and wrong others even if I keeled over before 50 I would count myself lucky. I enjoy my work but it can mean I work too hard and I see the signs every now and then. I am however very motivated to work hard on automation as I feel it offers the opportunity to work less hard but produce more sometime in the future.

Now automation is so addictive I can overwork myself trying to achieve it.
m_swetz
m_swetz
SSC Eights!
SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)SSC Eights! (812 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 812 Visits: 930
I agree with many of the points made in the editorial. I consider technical work to be "hard" generally speaking. While not physically demanding, the attention to detail and precision required exceeds a lot of other types of position. Not to mention the potential implications of even a minor error. There is also a constantly changing landscape you need to keep up with.

One of the more difficult aspects of technical work I've been pondering recently is the relative lack of influence and advancement potential in some, perhaps even many, organizations. I've seen different firms where decisions\promises were being made by non-technical staff motivated by making a sale without regard to feasibility. I've also seen companies where management didn't want to hear about "geek stuff" or complained that they even needed to have IT staff for their multi-site company with thousands of employees. I'm not sure what the solution is, or even if there is one, but it certainly seems worth exploring to me.
jasona.work
jasona.work
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)SSC-Forever (44K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 44455 Visits: 16746
I'm glad I found (well, it found me) my current position. While there are some stressful periods, very rarely do I have to deal with weekend / holiday work and when I do, I get comp time for it that I can use later, my pay is far better than my previous job so I'm finally able to start indulging in some of the hobbies I'd put on hold (model trains can be EXPENSIVE!) and (my Dr is happy about this) I'm finally getting off my butt and working on getting into shape. I'm even planning, once I get a bit more into shape, on riding my bike to and from work a couple days a week (~15 miles one-way)

Even better, while I'm currently the only DBA in my team, the management is working on getting one of the developers set up to be a backup for when I do go on vacation so I don't have to take along my work laptop and phone. Which will be nice, even though I probably (unless they explicitly tell me not too) will take them along anyways, just in case. Will I look at them while I'm gone? The phone I'll glance at once or twice a day when I'm in the hotel room (it gets my e-mail as well,) the laptop only if there's something that needs my attention (and my bar for that is fairly high, say, multiple e-mails plus phone calls and texts to my personal phone.)

But overall, yes, I do enjoy where I work, who I work with, and don't see burnout coming my way any time soon.
Jeff Mlakar
Jeff Mlakar
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2153 Visits: 639
I look at this in a few different ways. Here are my thoughts:

The majority of IT / engineers are doing their job and going home. Nothing wrong with that. Those that encumber themselves with too many demands suffer and burnout - often without being rewarded. I know in early jobs I had it was expected I would write code all day and night and when I asked for a raise they resisted. I left for a much better opportunity. Most people will not do that. I use the term "jobbers" for this group. In a way they are being taken advantage of and in another way they are being opportunistic with the labor they want to commit. Consequently this is not the highest paid bunch.

Then we have the top engineers at each organization. They are the movers and shakers who make most things happen. Remember learning about the Pareto Principle? These are the 20% of people who do 80% of the work. High compensation is here but also too is much higher expectations. Demands are far beyond just write some more code or do it faster. In these roles you are expected to work way more than 40 hour weeks. You'll likely be dealing with direct reports and their issues (so people issues and not technical issues) along with your technical duties. It will be harder to take vacation or be away for long. Taking phone calls after hours and travel can wear on a person. Burnout happens here but different. In the above group burnout is more from being bored and directionless. With the top group it is about truly burning the candle at both ends.

I like this topic - it encompasses many of the soft skills that technical people are not often taught. Ex. how many of your peers are good at advocating for themselves or being assertive (not aggressive but simply assertive)? Compare that with the personalities of your sales staff. Pretty different.
jay-h
jay-h
SSCoach
SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)SSCoach (15K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 15919 Visits: 2805
Some good points. I was discussing our mutual aging with a mechanic I know, and he commented that the physical demands of his job affected him more with age than my job would affect me, and I can see his point. I would suppose the situation is even worse for jobs like carpentry, masonry or farming.

I like my situation. I've worked here for nearly thirty years, and there are quite a few people here who've been longer than me. Stable job situations do remove a lot of stress. I'm 68, and of course I could have retired, but to me working is like riding a bicycle... if you stop, you fall. I could take a 'post retirement' type job.. but why?

...

-- FORTRAN manual for Xerox Computers --
Eric M Russell
Eric M Russell
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)SSC Guru (110K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 110036 Visits: 14724
Whenever I hear non-IT folks talk about how those of us in IT have it easy, I'm reminded of that Dire Straits song 'Money For Nothing'. Tongue

Normally I don't work from home, but I will on those days when there is a scheduled appliance repair or delivery. The HVAC/electrician/rug shampooer will often times ask what I do for a living and then comment that it must be nice working in IT. Some of them even ask how to go about starting a career in IT.


"The universe is complicated and for the most part beyond your control, but your life is only as complicated as you choose it to be."
thisisfutile
thisisfutile
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)SSCrazy (2.7K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2736 Visits: 1108
Jeff Mlakar - Thursday, May 24, 2018 7:28 AM
I like this topic - it encompasses many of the soft skills that technical people are not often taught. Ex. how many of your peers are good at advocating for themselves or being assertive (not aggressive but simply assertive)? Compare that with the personalities of your sales staff. Pretty different.
I liked your whole comment but this part really stood out to me. I can learn 10 different programming languages in a year but it may take the same amount of time for me to figure out how to confidently approach my boss for a raise, a task that any decent sale rep doesn't even consider a task. It just comes naturally to confidently approach another human with your thoughts.

Jeff Mlakar
Jeff Mlakar
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)SSCrazy (2.2K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2153 Visits: 639
thisisfutile - Thursday, May 24, 2018 7:58 AM
Jeff Mlakar - Thursday, May 24, 2018 7:28 AM
I like this topic - it encompasses many of the soft skills that technical people are not often taught. Ex. how many of your peers are good at advocating for themselves or being assertive (not aggressive but simply assertive)? Compare that with the personalities of your sales staff. Pretty different.
I liked your whole comment but this part really stood out to me. I can learn 10 different programming languages in a year but it may take the same amount of time for me to figure out how to confidently approach my boss for a raise, a task that any decent sale rep doesn't even consider a task. It just comes naturally to confidently approach another human with your thoughts.

Thanks. I am a very introverted person and this has been my focus for the past few years. I don't want the limelight or stage but I do want to be heard. I've come up with some strategies for that. IMO this is a skill that can be learned.

Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum








































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search