SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


The Avalanche of Cloud Computing


The Avalanche of Cloud Computing

Author
Message
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 247373 Visits: 19791
Comments posted to this topic are about the item The Avalanche of Cloud Computing

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
call.copse
call.copse
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 7382 Visits: 2084
Cloud computing is a good fit as long as your applications are not deeply embedded and entwined. Essentially if you are able to quickly and easily duplicate and move server and network setup. We hadn't developed appropriately in the past for it, but we are now. I wouldn't exactly say we are properly DevOps oriented, but we're a lot closer to that with what we put together these days, and hence I can't see us moving away from Cloud based systems now.
nick.barrett
nick.barrett
SSC Rookie
SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)SSC Rookie (31 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 31 Visits: 1
'email may never come back on-premises' ?
Outside the US, and with regard to the very long arms of the Patriot Act, there are many regulated market sectors whose data-security risk assessment keeps them well away from any US-domiciled service providers... and then there is the EU, with its new General Data Protection Regulation, which also constrains many sectors to keep the majority of their data [and data flows] well away from the major cloud service providers.
Many applications not handling personal data -are- suited to migration to cloud services; many are already hosted somewhere by service providers hurriedly re-branding their hosted service as a Cloud Offering... but until there is clear legal separation between in-country operators and their US parent brands that offers true protection from data access by DHS, acceptable to regulators, many markets will ignore the benefits of cloud.
Dave Schutz
Dave Schutz
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2415 Visits: 611
Our email won't come back on premises as it was moved to O365. Also or file server. I've also replicated most of our servers to Azure. It is certainly not a perfect cloud but neither was our on-premises environment. There are advantages and disadvantages to everything. I don't expect us to ever move these services back on-premises, but can't say cloud is forever. Who knows what the next big thing in IT will be? What will be the replacement for cloud infrastructure in the future.
Will some type of AI environment replace what we have now? Or some other technology we can't envision be the next big thing? I can't say, but for now we have embraced (for some things) the cloud.
chrisn-585491
chrisn-585491
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)SSCertifiable (5.9K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 5865 Visits: 2645
I think that many of the pundits and observers of this trend spend too much effort promoting the upside of centralized computing. The cloud computing/tech giants have too much power/information/influence at this time. Putting the industry/world in a handful of corporations that can turn the spigot off at any time due to internal or external influences isn't necessary a good thing. Not everything needs to be on the cloud in the hands of a few computer (or credit reporting) organizations. Maybe because most tech people believe in the goodness of people and gloss over history and true human nature.
Mike Dominick
Mike Dominick
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 433 Visits: 37
Cloud will definitely take over in the long run but its going to take another decade to get to the 80%+ mark and blue prints to successfully transition major systems like ERP's with many systems integrated with it in companyies away from monolithic application development. As the ERP systems change the speed of cloud adoption will continue to increase. (even if its just for specific services within the application)

A big accelerator, in my opinion, are companies building poor performing on-prem clouds. This exact scenario: "... the wandering performance levels of their systems. For executives used to knowing what the predictable level of performance was, even if poor, having systems (appear to) run randomly slower or faster can be maddening." is common place in companies as internal infrastructure team build their own virtual environments without the correct experience or infrastructure to support it. What results is IT spending more money on hardware than necessary and hiring more people which begins to make the cloud more appealing.

In the end what is absolutely maddening is when a system has unpredictable levels of performance and erodes trust in IT and the application vendor.

From the executive level they don't think about it as a database or on-premise issue... they see it as the applications fault and want to replace it. (More $)
The Application vendor see's it as a client issue, IT infrastructure or because client is on a 4 year old version of the application and refuses to upgrade.

As a results the Vendors are 100% motivated to go to the cloud because they can control the environment, who is putting data into the system and how (another major reason for system issues), support goes down, and as the final motivated, reoccurring revenue goes up. The only downside to vendors is they need to retool their development teams and architect their platforms which will take time for legacy applications and come at a significant expense.



jasona.work
jasona.work
SSCoach
SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)SSCoach (17K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 17964 Visits: 13338
nick.barrett - Thursday, September 21, 2017 2:54 AM
'email may never come back on-premises' ?
Outside the US, and with regard to the very long arms of the Patriot Act, there are many regulated market sectors whose data-security risk assessment keeps them well away from any US-domiciled service providers... and then there is the EU, with its new General Data Protection Regulation, which also constrains many sectors to keep the majority of their data [and data flows] well away from the major cloud service providers.
Many applications not handling personal data -are- suited to migration to cloud services; many are already hosted somewhere by service providers hurriedly re-branding their hosted service as a Cloud Offering... but until there is clear legal separation between in-country operators and their US parent brands that offers true protection from data access by DHS, acceptable to regulators, many markets will ignore the benefits of cloud.

This leads to an interesting thought. The trend (currently) is to migrate things like e-mail off-premise because (in theory) you no longer need to pay someone to manage your Exchange / sendmail / postfix / etc system and it's required hardware. BUT with in some locales the increasing requirements of maintaining data privacy will potentially result in a return to on-premise, we control it all, e-mail.

I have to wonder, also, how many businesses are rushing to the "cloud" without really thinking about what they really expect from it. Where I work, we're supposed to be migrating to "the cloud" and have some rather stringent requirements when it comes to both what can connect to our network (so no just spinning up some Azure SQL instances for me,) and what we are required to have monitoring those systems. So far, our "cloud" looks like it's going to be nothing more than our current setup of virtual machines picked up and dropped into some other data center outside our facility. Some day. Eventually. Of course, at the current "blistering" pace of our migration, I'll probably have moved on from this position before anything gets done (they've been talking about it since I started about 3-4yrs ago, and there's been no movement that I can see in the last couple years.)

bdcoder
bdcoder
SSC Veteran
SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)SSC Veteran (283 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 283 Visits: 235
Of all the words used in computing, the one I hate the most is "Cloud"! When did a warehouse of computers suddenly become a "cloud"? Clearly, I missed that marketing meeting!
Mike Dominick
Mike Dominick
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)SSC-Addicted (433 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 433 Visits: 37
I would say the biggest change that could create a shift back to on-premise will be bandwith costs.

The Telco's are sitting back and waiting for the tipping point where they know all your data is sitting in the cloud and the only way for companies to access is it is through them.

At the moment companies gets entrenched in the cloud (Both client and vendor) the Telco's will be in position to cash in.
They will be the modern day railroads and as of right now there is no way to move data without them.

They will attempt to move to a new model where companies are charged on a per MB to use their data and for priority access. Vendors will also get charged on the other side for priority access.
We already this happening today when the telco start throttling home connections or connections to services like Netflix.

If that starts to occur cloud adoption will slow, especially for centralized companies, and could also be the trigger to consider re-centralizing staff back into the corporate office.



Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)SSC Guru (247K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 247373 Visits: 19791
nick.barrett - Thursday, September 21, 2017 2:54 AM
'email may never come back on-premises' ?
Outside the US, and with regard to the very long arms of the Patriot Act, there are many regulated market sectors whose data-security risk assessment keeps them well away from any US-domiciled service providers... and then there is the EU, with its new General Data Protection Regulation, which also constrains many sectors to keep the majority of their data [and data flows] well away from the major cloud service providers.
Many applications not handling personal data -are- suited to migration to cloud services; many are already hosted somewhere by service providers hurriedly re-branding their hosted service as a Cloud Offering... but until there is clear legal separation between in-country operators and their US parent brands that offers true protection from data access by DHS, acceptable to regulators, many markets will ignore the benefits of cloud.

or local companies provide the offering. I'd think this will happen in conjunction with some companies working to provide separation from US government agencies

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum







































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search