Why say ''an SQL''

  • ChrisMoix-87856

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7288

    Yikes, didn't mean to start a huge discussion. Just to add more fuel to the fire, here's a guideline I found online:

    The Chicago Manual of Style (sec. 14.15, p. 464) says:

    Uncertainty often arises concerning the proper choice of the indefinite article before an acronym. A workable solution may be based on the way such an abbreviation is read. The assumption is that an acronym is read either as a series of letters or as a neologism, or coined word. Rarely is the acronym read as though all of the words were spelled out. If, as is usually the case, the acronym is treated as a series of letters, the choice of the article depends on the pronunciation of the first letter. (_an_ NAACP position vs. _a_ TVA power station)

    If the acronym is widely pronounced as though it were a word, the article is determined by the pronunciation of the word. (_a_ LOOM meeting vs. _an_ LCD panel)

     

    So, it you go by Ansi standards, AN SQL. If you go by US Gov't standards, A SQL.

         'The rule is that ISO Standards spell out letters and pronounce names.  US Government standards pronounce everything -- thus a PSRO (Phycians Standards Review Organization) is a "Piss Row"; I am not making that up.'

     

    or did I say that backwards?

  • Brian Laws

    SSCommitted

    Points: 1556

    This is exactly right. When you say "ess-que-el", you are beginning with a vowel sound. When you say "sequel", you are beginning with a consonant sound. English language/grammer dictates (with exceptions, of course) that "an" is used before words that begin with a vowel sound and "a" is used before words that begin with a consonant sound. It's a matter of sound, not the actual letter (whether or not it's a vowel). It's similar to "herb". If you pronounce the h, then you use "a". But if you pronounce it like "erb", then you use "an" because it's a vowel sound.

    I used to be an editor before I weasled my way into the IT department. ;->

    But I definitely like using "sequel". I may only use "es-que-el" if I'm talking with someone who may not know what I'm talking about.

  • sushila

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 35293

    Instead of considering it as fuel I think I'll see it as the "last word" that'll put out this fire....I agree entirely with that manual!

    Brian...not to start another discussion (absolutely NOT) - but it's only in America that they say "erb" for "herb"...

    Remi - you're right - come to think of it, I guess it IS easy to say - only sounds like someone's making funny sounds is all..







    **ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI !!!**

  • Ninja's_RGR'us

    SSC Guru

    Points: 294069

    Or forgetting to say all the words .

  • Frank Kalis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 111183

    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/fkalis/abriefhistoryofsql.asp

    I like to think it is S-Q-L

     

    --
    Frank Kalis
    Microsoft SQL Server MVP
    Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
    My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/[/url]

  • Frank Kalis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 111183

    Addendum: Got yesterday a book by CJ Date on my desk to review. It backs up, of course, what Joe already said. Because the correct pronounciation is Ess-Cue-El you say "An SQL" rather than "A SQL".

    Apart from this, if you ask me, I think it's moot.

    --
    Frank Kalis
    Microsoft SQL Server MVP
    Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
    My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/[/url]

  • Ninja's_RGR'us

    SSC Guru

    Points: 294069

    Moo point often take a lot of space on this board .

  • Frank Kalis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 111183

    Even more since you've entered...

    --
    Frank Kalis
    Microsoft SQL Server MVP
    Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
    My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/[/url]

  • Ninja's_RGR'us

    SSC Guru

    Points: 294069

    I was here since the first post. I just didn't reply untill now cause I had nothing to say. We just say s-q-l here, but it's in french, therefore irrelevant to this thread.

  • ChrisMoix-87856

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7288

    I can't really see arguing with someone who was/is on the ANSI comitee - I was just asking about one of those interesting things about English and uncovered some more info about SEQUEL vs. SQL, etc. Interesting...

  • Edward W. Stanley

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6462

    toe mate oh

    toe mah toe

    ????

     

  • Ninja's_RGR'us

    SSC Guru

    Points: 294069

    I don't know, but I like eating 'em. .

  • Wayne West

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22586

    And then for us multi-talented SQL and Cisco guys, you have routers. Or if you're in Canadia, "rooters." I'm never sure if I'm driving a route or a root. Which, I guess, is an argument for my "Got Root?" tshirt.

    -----
    [font="Arial"]Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves or we know where we can find information upon it. --Samuel Johnson[/font]

Viewing 13 posts - 16 through 28 (of 28 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply