Do the certifications add value?

  • htt

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5237


    Sorry, I understood 'job jumping' different. I thought of a person who has, for example, done car washing, served as a waiter and now is doing DBA


    In the past I've seen fresh MCSEs jumped place to palce after few months on a job.  Each time they got bigger $$$.  A programmer started with us as the 4th after working with 3 companies in the last 2 years.  Each time she lied about the past and got higher pay.  No wonder she was not getting a raise since she already made big bucks and she was the first one gone when the company started sending job to India. 

  • K. Brian Kelley

    SSC Guru

    Points: 114486

    I'll do you one better. I'll give you the sources where you can read it and store away for future reference!

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;283037

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;274750

     

    K. Brian Kelley
    @kbriankelley

  • Frank Kalis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 111183

    Actually, here in Germany, you can become subject to legal consequences when your employer finds out that you lied in the interview on your payment or alike.

    That's not worth it. They'll find sooner or later out anyway what someone is really worth.

    --
    Frank Kalis
    Microsoft SQL Server MVP
    Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
    My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/[/url]

  • Temmu

    Old Hand

    Points: 349

    honesty is best.  confidence is appropriate, er, mandatory.  stating you can do work at the next level up from where you are now is ok if you honestly believe your experience will enable you to accomplish the task - that's confidence, not lying.  

    stating you can walk on water when you can only drink it is another story 

  • htt

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5237

    if I am interviewee what do you think when I say 'Honestly I never done this but I am surely able to find out and have it done ASAP for you' ? 

  • K. Brian Kelley

    SSC Guru

    Points: 114486

    If possible, also cite similar technologies and work experiences... for instance, if you've been a Sybase DBA, that's a lot closer to being a SQL Server DBA than say someone who was a web developer (one who didn't also wear a DBA or DB developer hat, of course).

     

    K. Brian Kelley
    @kbriankelley

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 720383

    I'd ask you "how would you find out?" and see what you said. Personally I think honesty, including "I don't know" is the best policy. I've been doing this for over a decade and I still use "I don't know" more than I'd like.

    My thoughts on interviewing:http://www.sqlservercentral.com/columnists/sjones/whodoyouhire.asp

  • Frank Kalis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 111183

    I agree with Steve!

    To say, 'I don't know this yet, but I certainly will in a foreseeable future' should be by far better than saying, that you already know virtually everything and then fail on a given task

    --
    Frank Kalis
    Microsoft SQL Server MVP
    Webmaster: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs
    My blog: http://www.insidesql.org/blogs/frankkalis/[/url]

  • Temmu

    Old Hand

    Points: 349

    if i thought myself able to pick up on similar but new-to-me technology, i'd say, for example, i've done reporting on db2 and access databases for x nr of years, and so reporting for this other sql db technology would be a logical extension of that... etc.

    let them know where your strength(s) are and how you learned new technology in another position.

    but to simply say you can do something you've never seen before is a stretch and leads to a short stay at a job, if hired...

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