SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


5 Tips for Becoming a Better Data Modeler


5 Tips for Becoming a Better Data Modeler

Author
Message
cs_troyk
cs_troyk
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2142 Visits: 973
Comments posted to this topic are about the item 5 Tips for Becoming a Better Data Modeler



Bill Wimsatt-448069
Bill Wimsatt-448069
Valued Member
Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 57 Visits: 25
This article is so "motherhood and apple pie" it says nothing. I do not think the work normalize or denormalize is even used. The author also did not even mention conceptual, logical and physical modelling. These are all extremely important since most data modellers jump right to physical modelling and never understand the data of the application problem that is to be solved.

If you want some meat and not just a bunch of words, I would highly recommend David Hay as an author and his free papers. David has the best book on data modelling called Conventions of Thought. This book will provide a solid foundation in data modelling. David also has a very good white paper on comparison of data modeling notation (Barker, Chen, UML, etc.). It is very important to understand the difference between notation and technique. Notation is just the (drawing) semantic. Technique is how you actually get the answer and what you do with it. David's website is: http://www.essentialstrategies.com/

If you are a beginner, I would highly recommend Richard Barker's book on Entity Modelling. Yes, it is from Oracle Press but it has nothing to do with the Oracle product other than solid data modelling notation AND technique. You can find used versions of this book on Amazon for ~$2. Read it. Study it. Live it.
Here is a link to Amazon for the book: http://www.amazon.com/Case-Method-Entity-Relationship-Modelling/dp/0201416964/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1203439277&sr=8-1

If SQL ServerCentral wants a real article written, feel free to drop me a line.

Bill
cs_troyk
cs_troyk
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2142 Visits: 973
Thank you for the comments, Bill.

Correct - if you're looking for specific examples or "how to", this article isn't it. See my earlier series "Toward Integrity" for that: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Data+Modeling/61526/.

The purpose of this article is simply to give the aspiring modeler/designer some direction that's sorely lacking if one approaches the discipline from learning the tools (which, to be fair, is how I started out).

I second your recommendation of Hay's books. I have two on my bookshelf and will soon be ordering a 3rd by him.

TroyK



Bill Wimsatt-448069
Bill Wimsatt-448069
Valued Member
Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)Valued Member (57 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 57 Visits: 25
Troy,

Sorry to be so critical. I have been burned by people who use the title "Data Modeller" and they really are not. Or the Object crowd that don't care about the database design and really just want a file system. So, personally, I am very sensitive to this topic and react quite strongly.

There are few good resources anymore for the beginning data model student. That is why I point to Richard Barker's book. He walks through the initial stages and builds up a very strong business model that is represented in a data model. If you do not have this, spend the couple of $ to get a copy.

Bill
cs_troyk
cs_troyk
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2142 Visits: 973
No worries, Bill. I intentionally kept the content a bit light because I specifically wanted to elicit others' opinions and resources here in the discussion. To that end, thanks once again for sharing those resources that you've found helpful.

TroyK



timothyawiseman
timothyawiseman
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)SSCrazy (2.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2388 Visits: 920
Bill Wimsatt (2/19/2008)
This article is so "motherhood and apple pie" it says nothing. I do not think the work normalize or denormalize is even used. The author also did not even mention conceptual, logical and physical modelling. These are all extremely important since most data modellers jump right to physical modelling and never understand the data of the application problem that is to be solved.

Bill


I partially agree that the content was a little light, but at the same time, what is there is all well written and correct. The fact it includes a list of recommended texts is also a good point. When there are an incredible number of books published even on a fairly specialized topic like data modeling and data base administration, having a well thought out and vetting reading list is itself of great value.

---
Timothy A Wiseman
SQL Blog: http://timothyawiseman.wordpress.com/
cs_troyk
cs_troyk
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2142 Visits: 973
Thanks for reading, Timothy.

Any books, classes, or online resources you've found helpful that haven't yet been mentioned?

TroyK



alittledog
alittledog
Grasshopper
Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)Grasshopper (19 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 19 Visits: 18
I would treat this effort as a class and offer up the following syllabus:

Materials
David Hay’s Conventions of Thought, Data Model Patterns

Richard Barker's Entity Modelling

Some book on 3rd order predicate calculus—need to find my as a reference

Installed Local Database (pick one) with SQL only tool (no TOAD et al)



Goals
Understand databases
-Relational vs. Hierarchical
-ACID test
Understand conceptual data modeling
Understand logical data modeling
-Relationships
-Attributes
-Logical PK
Convert conceptual data model into logical data models
Understand the rules for first, second and third-normal forms
Understand the reasons for de-normalizing a physical data model
Understand components of a database
-Table
-Keys
-Indexes
-Referential Integrity
-Views
-Functions
-Procedures
-Triggers
Understand issues related to data warehousing
-Summary Tables
-Star Schemas
-Point In Time Reporting
-Changes to Logical PK
Understand differences between OLAP and OLTP
Develop a dimensional data model to satisfy Barker’s model
Perform data manipulation using SQL
-Simple
-Complex
-Nested everything
-Models
-Analytic functions


Class
Read Barker

Build Barker as scripts and execute

Load Barker Structures from your scripts

Query Barker

Read Data Model Patterns

Rinse and repeat for the books

When you can write a paragraph on everything listed in the Goals, then you have completed data modeling 101-202. Congrats
cs_troyk
cs_troyk
SSCrazy
SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)SSCrazy (2.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 2142 Visits: 973
alittledog (2/25/2008)
I would treat this effort as a class and offer up the following syllabus:

Materials
David Hay’s Conventions of Thought, Data Model Patterns

Richard Barker's Entity Modelling

Some book on 3rd order predicate calculus—need to find my as a reference

Installed Local Database (pick one) with SQL only tool (no TOAD et al)




Greetings, alittledog;

Definitely agree on the recommendation for Hay's book.

I agree also on the "(pick one)" recommendation for installing a local db. In fact, one thing I need to do is branch out some and play with MySQL and Postgres. Currently, my only real exposure is MS SQL and Oracle, so it would be good to get some hands on with the other players, too.

Thanks for the comments and recommendations!

TroyK



Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum

































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search