SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Should We Move to Azure?


Should We Move to Azure?

Author
Message
Rod
Rod
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.6K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 3572 Visits: 694
Just this week I registered a domain for myself. I've not registered any domain in several years, so it was a re-learning experience. Anyway, once I registered the domain than I had to think of where to host it. I did look at Azure, but felt that it was way too expensive for an individual. However, for a site like SQL Server Central, which must have at least hundreds of thousands, if not a million users, I think Azure makes sense. I'd say go for it.

Rod
chrisn-585491
chrisn-585491
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.8K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 7832 Visits: 2788
Just to add some motivational fuel:

If RedGate can't use, admin and monitor Azure, what chance do us mere mortals have?

:-P
EdVassie
EdVassie
SSC-Dedicated
SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 34311 Visits: 3932
At the very least you should look at what is needed to make a cloud migration successful for you.

I was part of the team that moved my employers systems to AWS as an IaaS move in 2012. Back then AWS was the only reasonable host for an operation of our scale, but this is no longer the case. For our move we installed SQL on to AWS servers using our own licenses, but this was always regarded as a stepping stone towards DB as a Service, and we are now starting this move.

Part of our planning covered email, as we send a few million emails each day. AWS SES looked too costly, so eventually we chose PowerMTA to do the email send, and hired PostMastery to manage the email reputation issues.

All hosting options have costs, risks, and opportunities. Different costs, risks and opportunities apply to wholly-owned, co-lo, hybrid cloud and dedicated cloud. Doing nothing is never cost and risk free, and will limit your opportunities compared to one of the other options. Part of the job of IT is to align the costs, risks and opportunities with what will best help the business to succeed.

Original author: SQL Server FineBuild 1-click install and best practice configuration of SQL Server 2017 2016, 2014, 2012, 2008 R2, 2008 and 2005. 14 Mar 2017: now over 40,000 downloads.Disclaimer: All information provided is a personal opinion that may not match reality.Quote: When I give food to the poor they call me a saint. When I ask why they are poor they call me a communist. - Archbishop Hélder Câmara
Dave Poole
Dave Poole
SSC-Dedicated
SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (35K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 35001 Visits: 3731
I've spent 3 years dealing with AWS so I would be asking whether the tasks that go away due to the move to a cloud provider allow you to pursue activities that are more beneficial to your organisation.

If you have traditional hardware that isn't going away and your system is one that barely represents an increment in the work to keep the other systems on that hardware operational then there is little benefit in migrating.
EXCEPT...having cloud experience in a work capacity looks good on your CV. The cynic in me notes that an awful lot of technology choices seem to be fuelled by the CV aspirations of the decision influencers/makers than organisational need.

Where a move to the cloud makes sense is

  • You don't need the facility 24/7/365

  • The cost of admin on-premise exceeds the benefit of doing so

  • The facilities in the cloud offer features that are genuinely useful but would require additional purchase if attempted on-premise

  • The cloud facility frees you to focus on other value-add stuff

  • The system (while useful and valuable) is not core to the business. It's analogous to payroll. I'm not sure how many companies run their own payroll anymore

  • Integration with other highly desirable cloud provider facilities is straight forward. AWS, Google and Microsoft have a lot of AI/ML/DW facilities that would be very expensive to acquire and support on-premise

  • Hardware refresh and licence upgrades are coming around.

  • Your cloud vendor offers red-hot services including security and design advice



If a company starts shifting to the cloud there comes a tipping point beyond which the cost of paying for their own data centre just doesn't make sense. You end up with a few systems having to bear the brunt of the costs of that on-premise data centre, at which point on-premise no-longer makes financial sense.

LinkedIn Profile
www.simple-talk.com
bkubicek
bkubicek
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)SSCertifiable (6.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 6133 Visits: 942
I have a hard time believing that the cloud would be cost effective for a site like SQLServerCentral. It seems like the pricing in the cloud it still a bit expensive. I guess that might be a good first step is to better quantify how much is running the site currently costing you? How much more would it cost to put it in the cloud? Then the debate might be more on if that cost difference was worth it or not?

Ben
xsevensinzx
xsevensinzx
SSChampion
SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)SSChampion (10K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 10844 Visits: 4148
I think for me, having to go to someone on-prem and saying I need X, Y, and Z to make this work has a high tenancy to lead to acquiring and purchasing additional hardware, setup, and costs. This requires a lot of prep in some organizations to make happen. Cloud on the other hand, it's extremely easy to spin up on hardware you do not own. The ability to be lean there is pretty awesome. It also can be put into your hands a lot easier than someone else.

On top of that, another cool benefit I've noticed lately is the fact AWS, Azure and the works have new tech and features coming out all the time. While you may just need a VM and SQL Server, you also have the ability to pivot towards other tech you may not event try because you just don't want to spend the time also finding a test bed, installing it yourself and all that jive. They do make it very accessible for you to try out Hadoop for example, or PostgreSQL, and so forth extremely easy.

But yeah, I could totally be fine with my existing hardware I could feel and touch. I could have my own dedicated disks that are not virtualized and all that jive. Sounds really awesome up until the point I pivot to needing more and needing it fast.
Dalkeith
Dalkeith
Ten Centuries
Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)Ten Centuries (1.3K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1289 Visits: 1235
I think xsevensinzx hit it on the head - cloud services have automated the request process for asking for more hardware or services - that process alone in some organisations is either unavailable to many or takes a ridiculous amount of time and energy.

It very much standardises the platform and processes as well for employees between companies - no more learning new admin processes every time you move to a new company or knowing "the" person to talk to about all the undocumented configurations that take a few months or years to get to grips with.
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 328317 Visits: 20105
David.Poole - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 1:57 AM
I've spent 3 years dealing with AWS so I would be asking whether the tasks that go away due to the move to a cloud provider allow you to pursue activities that are more beneficial to your organisation.
...
If a company starts shifting to the cloud there comes a tipping point beyond which the cost of paying for their own data centre just doesn't make sense. You end up with a few systems having to bear the brunt of the costs of that on-premise data centre, at which point on-premise no-longer makes financial sense.

We're already slightly in the cloud at Rackspace. We started moving many things off-premise to ease the burden on IT. We don't really have less IT, but they can do more because they don't play hardware games. Been a positive move.


Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 328317 Visits: 20105
bkubicek - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 6:37 AM
I have a hard time believing that the cloud would be cost effective for a site like SQLServerCentral. It seems like the pricing in the cloud it still a bit expensive. I guess that might be a good first step is to better quantify how much is running the site currently costing you? How much more would it cost to put it in the cloud? Then the debate might be more on if that cost difference was worth it or not?

Ben

Cheaper than our hosting costs now in Azure/EC2.


Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)SSC Guru (328K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 328317 Visits: 20105
Dalkeith - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 8:07 AM
I think xsevensinzx hit it on the head - cloud services have automated the request process for asking for more hardware or services - that process alone in some organisations is either unavailable to many or takes a ridiculous amount of time and energy.

It very much standardises the platform and processes as well for employees between companies - no more learning new admin processes every time you move to a new company or knowing "the" person to talk to about all the undocumented configurations that take a few months or years to get to grips with.

Not to ignore xsevensinzx, but for both of you, we have much of this already. We have demo systems in EC2, and I can click a button to spin up a new copy of one in about 10 minutes. Rather amazing. Adding more hardware fairly easy.

It's pretty easy at Rackspace now, but a bit pricey.


Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum








































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search