SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


The Control Poll


The Control Poll

Author
Message
Gary Varga
Gary Varga
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 46174 Visits: 6562
I am at the whim of my clients. I can recommend, request as well as try to cajole but at the end of the day I am often not allowed to install software and certainly not allowed to create data repositories. The good news is that the vast majority of clients have used some form of version control for a long time now. I have often disliked the systems or practices employed but they are always better than nothing (and lets face it sometimes dislike doesn't mean they are wrong ;-))

Worst case scenario, I use a similar file scheme to Steve's (probably like most other people).

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
joe.eager
joe.eager
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)SSC-Addicted (468 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 468 Visits: 467
Is anyone using Continuous Integration with their Source Control solution?

Unit testing?
Gary Varga
Gary Varga
SSC-Forever
SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)SSC-Forever (46K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 46174 Visits: 6562
I have used Continuous Integration (CI) before and wholeheartedly recommend it.

Currently applying Test Driven Development (TDD) and recommend it too.

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
WolforthJ
WolforthJ
Old Hand
Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)Old Hand (372 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 372 Visits: 268
We use VSS, and I'm in the minority of team that advocates it. I know there are better options, but I don't want to open that can of worms. The first sub-team I was on avoided using it, we just kept the two versions in regular disk space. When that manager changed, I checked that code in.

In the past, I have been a team of one, and I used VSS. If no other reason, the ability to take two versions and instantly find differences is invaluable.
Steve Jones
Steve Jones
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)SSC Guru (329K reputation)

Group: Administrators
Points: 329444 Visits: 20109
Nadrek (5/20/2013)
For those using a "real" version control system: When was the last time you tested a restore of one of your CVS backups?


Excellent point.

Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest
Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
My Blog: www.voiceofthedba.com
Tom Thomson
Tom Thomson
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 50688 Visits: 13159
I've used a variety of version control systems over the years, including a couple of home-rolled ones back in the days when there were no useful version control systems. Most version control systems are horribly flawed in that they make no attempt to integrate version control and configuration control. When each developer is responsible for his own chunk of code (so that the semaphore effect of checkin/checkout is irrelevant) a very simple version control system is fine provided it hooks onto some sort of configuration control. For projects with fewer than about 30 developers, complex checkin/checkout can be just a pain - it may be better to work with a t-card system on an array of slots on a wall somewhere (open plan offices and low-wall cubicles have of course reduced the available wall-space so in many places the T-card version of checkin-checkout can't work). For really cooperative development (where the checkout semaphore is multi-pass) some sort of merge process is needed with checkin, and although there are several attempts out there to automate that I would rather do what I did back in the early days - have human beings handle the merge (with the aid of tools designed to help them, of course).
In my first job, we had no version control - and it didn't seem to do any harm; but we were doing research, not development. I left that job at the end of March 1969. In my second job I invented my own version control, because as well as research I was doing some development. after that there was always some sort of version control, although it varied from being a component of a very feature-rich development environment, ICL's CADES to something very simple like VSS. In my last permanent job, when I joined the company (2002) it used VSS for all C++, some JS, all HTML, and nothing at all for SQL or Flash. The only way to discover the current schema was to log in to one of the customer sites and get it to script every database - you had to know which customer had the latest version, but as there were only two customers at the time that wasn't too hard; I changed that rather quickly.

Tom

Japie Botma
Japie Botma
UDP Broadcaster
UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)UDP Broadcaster (1.5K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 1460 Visits: 385
We used a product called PureCM, because it was the cheapest. At home I use it too, because the first two licenses are free. Simple, easy to install with merge control tools and much more.

5ilverFox
Consulting DBA / Developer
South Africa
Tom Thomson
Tom Thomson
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)SSC Guru (50K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 50688 Visits: 13159
Looking at this editorial again, and the comment I posted four years ago, I see that I failed to say that this was an excellent editorial, which I certainly should have said.
I also failed to say that I regard not having all of ones code (including all the DDL for everything) in version control, and not having it seperated into fairly minimal units (each table's definition in a separate unit, instead of the whole datsbase s one unit) is either utter insanity or proof of insufficient experience to get it right.

Tom

hjp
hjp
SSC Eights!
SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)SSC Eights! (841 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 841 Visits: 146
I didn't chip in 4 years ago, so I might as well today. The editorial is as relevant as ever.

I put far more time and effort into maintaining our code and database schemas in version control than I gain from it. But to me, it's a principle.
It is, however, also a principle I am alone in my shop fighting for. Not that I experience that much opposition; the others just doesn't care about it, and they circumvent our VCS procedures whenever they want. So in short: Everything I am in charge of is version controlled. Everything else is not.

But the biggest thing for me is: I work in the cross field of IT and business. What good is it that our code is version controlled, when everything else (from policies and procedures, to budgets, annual reports, meeting minutes, work prepared and done in Word, Excel, Power Point, etc. etc.) is not? Because Version Control is great for so much else - both when you collaborate with colleagues and other contributors, and when you work on something alone over lengthy stretches of time. How many times have I not met the question "who changed the file last week? - and what change was made?"...?
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum








































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search