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DateTime Puzzle


DateTime Puzzle

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Ken Wymore
Ken Wymore
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Nice question, even better discussion. Thanks all!
Paul White
Paul White
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marlon.seton (5/8/2012)
What I find more disturbing than this reliance on implicit conversion and thinking of a DATETIME value being held as a float is the reference to 12.00 AM. Surely everyone knows midnight and noon are neither PM nor AM.

This article sums the situation up quite well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12-hour_clock#Confusion_at_noon_and_midnight

Even if we take the position that AM and PM, taken literally from their meanings in Latin, do not apply to midnight and noon, there are still certain practicalities to consider. For example, certain CONVERT styles specify AM and PM. By convention, we set midnight as AM and noon as PM:


SELECT CONVERT(char(26), CONVERT(datetime, '2012-07-11 00:00:00', 120), 109);
SELECT CONVERT(char(26), CONVERT(datetime, '2012-07-11 12:00:00', 120), 109);





Paul White
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David Conn
David Conn
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The sooner we stop using datetime the better. We now have Date & Time Data Types and DateTime2.

It's fairly straight forward: Dates and Times should be stored as such. If a Timestamp is required then use Datetime2 with its correct level of accuracy.
zymos
zymos
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Easy and straight forward one. Thanks
Britt Cluff
Britt Cluff
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Good question. Thanks for submitting.

http://brittcluff.blogspot.com/
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