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The Scary DBA

I have twenty+ years experience in IT. That time was spent in technical support, development and database administration. I work forRed Gate Software as a Product Evangelist. I write articles for publication at SQL Server Central, Simple-Talk, PASS Book Reviews and SQL Server Standard. I have published two books, ”Understanding SQL Server Execution Plans” and “SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled.” I’m one of the founding officers of the Southern New England SQL Server Users Group and its current president. I also work on part-time, short-term, off-site consulting contracts. In 2009 and 2010 I was awarded as a Microsoft SQL Server MVP. In the past I’ve been called rough, intimidating and scary. To which I usually reply, “Good.” You can contact me through grant -at- scarydba dot kom (unobfuscate as necessary).

AdventureWorks2012 Bug on Azure

While I have production databases in Azure, I can’t exactly experiment with them at will. Further, while they mostly have pretty innocuous data, it’s not all public. So, I need a mechanism for creating a database that I can play with in Azure. I use AdventureWorks. I get it. It’s not that big (actually a good thing for Azure) and it’s not a great database design which doesn’t reflect reality (I would argue makes this reflects reality as I’ve seen it). However, it’s a handy resource because you can go to Codeplex and download it. That makes it a great way to teach others because everyone has access to it.

But…

The other day I download the database and install it on my Azure system. I wanted cleaned up copies of everything for a series of tests and to help get ready for my pre-con at the PASS Summit. I ran a Powershell command to create a copy of the database and was presented with an error. Seems one of the tables, DatabaseLog, didn’t have a clustered primary key, a requirement in Azure. You can create tables without a clustered primary key in Azure, but if you attempt to access that table, you’ll get an error. That’s what was happening to me. Now I had just created two copies of AdventureWorks on two different servers and I had used SQL Compare & SQL Data Compare to create a copy of the database (testing stuff for work too). I had three copies available to validate that it wasn’t something I had screwed up. Nope. It was them, not me.

You can go to Connect to vote up the fix. I also posted the very simple work-around for the issue.

I would be remiss if I didn’t give you one more opportunity to win an Aston Martin. Connect your MSDN account to an Azure account for your chance to win. Oh, and to get a great place to go to learn and test and grow your skill set. All this at no cost to you and no credit card required.

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