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The Scary DBA

I have twenty+ years experience in IT. That time was spent in technical support, development and database administration. I work forRed Gate Software as a Product Evangelist. I write articles for publication at SQL Server Central, Simple-Talk, PASS Book Reviews and SQL Server Standard. I have published two books, ”Understanding SQL Server Execution Plans” and “SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled.” I’m one of the founding officers of the Southern New England SQL Server Users Group and its current president. I also work on part-time, short-term, off-site consulting contracts. In 2009 and 2010 I was awarded as a Microsoft SQL Server MVP. In the past I’ve been called rough, intimidating and scary. To which I usually reply, “Good.” You can contact me through grant -at- scarydba dot kom (unobfuscate as necessary).

Volunteering With PASS

I was just asked how many times I’ve been to the PASS Summit. This year will be my 12th consecutive one. That made me start thinking. At my very first Summit, I met a couple of volunteers for PASS (Allen Kinsel was one of them, I’ll blame him… Read more

0 comments, 53 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 29 September 2016

Networking and the PASS Summit

PASS Summit 2016 is fast approaching. If you’re going, time to start making plans. If you’re not going, sell your boss on the idea and get registered. It’s only the largest Microsoft Data Platform event on the planet. There are over 200 sessions given by some of the most knowledgeable… Read more

0 comments, 72 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 27 September 2016

Query Store and What Happened Earlier On Your Server

Here’s a great question I received: We had a problem at 9:02 AM this morning, but we’re not sure what happened. Can Query Store tell us?

My first blush response is, no. Not really. Query Store keeps aggregate performance metrics about the queries on the database where Query Store is… Read more

1 comments, 104 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 26 September 2016

Query Store and Plan Forcing: What Do You Use It For

If you’re working with Azure SQL Database or you’ve moved into SQL Server 2016, one of the biggest new tools is the Query Store. It provides a mechanism of capturing query performance over time and persisting it with the database. You also get the execution plans for those queries. Finally,… Read more

1 comments, 646 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 19 September 2016

The Clustered Index Is Vital To Your Database Design

This is post #9 supporting  Tim Ford’s (b|t) initiative on #iwanttohelp, #entrylevel. Read about it here.

You get one clustered index per table.

That bears repeating, you get one clustered index per table.

Choosing a clustered index is an extremely important and fundamental aspect of all… Read more

5 comments, 1,878 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 12 September 2016

Kilt Day! PASS Summit 2016, Thursday

Thursday at the PASS Summit is Kilt Day.

This means you should wear a kilt. Whether you do it in support of Women in Technology, or you just like to swan about in a kilt, this is the day to sport your kilt. Whether you have a fully traditional tartan Read more

2 comments, 109 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 7 September 2016

Query Store, Force Plan and “Better” Plans

I am endlessly fascinated by how the Query Store works. I love teaching it at every opportunity too. Plus, almost every time I teach it, I get a new question about the behavior that makes me delve into the Query Store just a little bit more, enabling me to better… Read more

1 comments, 877 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 6 September 2016

Azure SQL Data Warehouse Execution Plans

Azure SQL Data Warehouse can sometimes feel like it’s completely different from SQL Server, but under the covers, it is still (mostly) SQL Server and it does have execution plans. Let’s take a look at one.

I’ve created a new SQL Data Warehouse using the sample database available on the… Read more

4 comments, 170 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 29 August 2016

PASS Board Update

Time for another update.

The minutes for the June in-person meeting have been approved and are now ready for your information. We accomplished a lot in the two days and you can read what we did there. I’m pleased about two things. First, while it took until the July meeting… Read more

4 comments, 725 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 25 August 2016

Run For the PASS Board

When the word comes around for elections to the PASS Board, are you one of those people who, even in passing, considers running? If you are, my advice is to well, do it.

By the way, here’s that word.

In order to make this a stronger, even more vibrant… Read more

0 comments, 149 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 22 August 2016

Updates to Azure Data Platform Learning Resources

I’m acting as the curator to a list of Azure Data Platform Learning Resources. It’s speakers and teachers, blogs, articles and more, all focused around the Azure Data Platform. I have it hosted on GitHub so that anyone can contribute. There have been several updates recently that you may… Read more

1 comments, 246 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 17 August 2016

Query Store, Force Plan and Dropped Objects

I love the Query Store. Seriously. It’s a huge leap forward in the capabilities of Azure SQL Database and SQL Server in support of performance monitoring and query optimization. One of my favorite aspects of the Query Store is the ability to force plans. Frankly though, it’s also the scariest… Read more

5 comments, 1,205 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 15 August 2016

Azure SQL Database For Your First Database

This is post 8 supporting  Tim Ford’s (b|t) initiative on #iwanttohelp, #entrylevel. Read about it here.

In post #6, I talked about Azure SQL Database as one of the choices you have when you’re picking the type of SQL Server instance you want to run.… Read more

4 comments, 1,087 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 9 August 2016

There Is No Difference Between Table Variables, Temporary Tables and Common Table Expressions

I actually saw the above statement posted online. The person making the claim further stated that choosing between these three constructs was “personal preference” and didn’t change at all the way SQL Server would choose to deal with them in a query.

Let’s immediately say, right up front, the title… Read more

1 comments, 920 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 1 August 2016

Monitor Query Performance

Blog post #7 in support of Tim Ford’s (b|t) #iwanttohelp, #entrylevel. Read about it here.

Sooner or later when you’re working with SQL Server, someone is going to complain that the server is slow. I already pointed out the first place you should look when this… Read more

2 comments, 1,970 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 25 July 2016

Common Table Expression, Just a Name

The Common Table Expression (CTE) is a great tool in T-SQL. The CTE provides a mechanism to define a query that can be easily reused over and over within another query. The CTE also provides a mechanism for recursion which, though a little dangerous and overused, is extremely handy for… Read more

10 comments, 2,965 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 18 July 2016

Same Query, Different Servers, Different Performance. Now What?

Based on the number of times I see this question on forums, it must be occurring all the time. You have two different servers that, as far as you know, are identical in terms of their options and setup (although not necessarily in terms of power, think a test or… Read more

10 comments, 1,839 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 11 July 2016

Carpenters vs. DBAs

Let’s get the caveat out of the way up front, I work for a tool vendor.

If you look around at the tools landscape for the Microsoft Data Platform, it’s really interesting. There are a few tools vendors, primarily clustered around monitoring tools, and then there are a bunch of… Read more

10 comments, 917 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 5 July 2016

CASE Statement in GROUP BY

Set based operations means you should put everything into a single statement, right?

Well, not really. People seem to think that having two queries is really bad, so when faced with logical gaps, they just cram them into the query they have. This is partly because SQL Server and T-SQL… Read more

4 comments, 3,832 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 28 June 2016

Because

Because there’s nothing else I can do at the moment.

 

The post Because appeared first on Home Of The Scary DBA.

Read more

1 comments, 215 reads

Posted in The Scary DBA on 14 June 2016

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