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Chris's SQL Blog

SQL Server Consultant and Exceptional DBA Awards 2011 Finalist with extensive experience in the financial, health and retail sectors. I’m extremely strong in all areas of SQL Server and specialise in Security but really get my kicks from System Optimisation and Performance Tuning. Being a DBA is a thankless task at times but sadly I do enjoy it. Any spare time I have (when not playing rugby, football, cricket, in the gym or spending time with the family) I’m trying to help out others via social network sites such as the #sqlhelp hastag on Twitter (follow me @billysassage),www.sqlservercentral.com (ChrisTaylor) or by attending and contributing to the UK SQL User Groups (www.sqlserverfaq.com) held in Manchester and Leeds.

How to output from invoke-sqlcmd to Powershell variable

Sorry for another Powershell post but I’ve been doing a lot of it recently and coming up with (what i think are) a few nifty tricks.

One of the issues I encountered recently was with Kerberos delegation whilst trying to automate Log Shipping. What I was trying to do was use an OPENROWSET query to run against the Primary and Secondary servers in order to obtain the Primary_id and Secondary_id in order to pass to the script to be ran on the monitor server. However, seeing as the environment was not setup for Kerberos I encountered the “double-hop” issue.

Enabling Kerberos delegation for the service account would be too high a risk without thorough testing so wasn’t an option in this instance so I decided to look into using invoke-sqlcmd against each of the servers to get the IDs required and pass it to the monitor script.

So how did I go about doing this you ask, well its actually really simple. After a bit of googling I came across this blog by Allen White which gave me a starting block.

Firstly, you have to amend your TSQL script to SELECT the parameter you want to output and use within the rest of the script, something like this:

TSQL snippet to be ran against the Primary Server:

--Cut down version of the script for readability
EXEC @SP_Add_RetCode = master.dbo.sp_add_log_shipping_primary_database 
		@database = N'$(Database)' 
		...
		,@primary_id = @LS_PrimaryId OUTPUT --This is what we want
		,@overwrite = 1 
		,@ignoreremotemonitor = 1 

--Need to output this in order for powershell to take it and use it in the monitor script
SELECT @LS_PrimaryId as LS_PrimaryId 

Do the same for the script to run on the secondary server but obviously for the secondary_id :)

So, now you’ve setup the TSQL side of things, you need to then call these from Powershell and assign the output parameter to a Powershell variable like so:


$script = "LogShip_Primary.sql"
$PrimaryID = Invoke-Sqlcmd -InputFile $ScriptLocation$script -Variable Database=$DatabaseName, etc etc etc -ServerInstance $PrimaryServer 

$script = "LogShip_Secondary.sql" 
$SecondaryID = Invoke-Sqlcmd -InputFile $ScriptLocation$script -Variable Database=$DatabaseName, etc etc etc -ServerInstance $SecondaryServer

So, relatively simple. Basically your setting the output to a Powershell variable. keeping things tidy, re-assign it to another variable and something to note is that the output is actually a DataTable object. Make sure you use the name of the alias you used in your last TSQL statement.


$PID = $PrimaryID.LS_PrimaryId
$SID = $SecondaryID.LS_SecondaryId 

Once this is done then you can use this in your script to run against the monitor server


$script = "LogShip_Monitor.sql" 
Invoke-Sqlcmd -InputFile $ScriptLocation$script -Variable Database=$DatabaseName, etc etc etc, PrimaryID=$PID, SecondaryID=$SID -ServerInstance $MonitorServer

And there you have it, nice n simple! All you then have to do is wrap it in a foreach loop for the databases you want to setup and a nice and simple automated logshipping build script.

Obviously I’ve omitted a lot of the setup / checking of scripts etc from this post as I don’t want to be doing all the work for you!

Enjoy :)


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