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Do You Talk Salary in the Interview? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, November 25, 2010 9:20 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Do You Talk Salary in the Interview?






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Post #1026630
Posted Thursday, November 25, 2010 9:36 PM


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I agree... I usually don't even entertain the idea of an interview unless I already know the salary range. I don't want to waste their time or my time.

There are exceptions, of course. I may interview for a job that is particullary interesting to me or it's super close to home without knowing the salary ahead of time. I also say that after what you think is a killer interview would be the time to negotiate salary while your performance during the interview is fresh on their minds. You might be able to get more than advertised if you made a really, really good impression.


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Post #1026633
Posted Thursday, November 25, 2010 10:52 PM


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Knowing the salary range ahead of time is helpful. I hate talking money during the interview though - no matter the perceived performance. The problem with talking money during an interview is that not everybody in that room should be privy to the salary requests. If they become privy to the salary conversation and then you are hired - that could create problems.

However, if they ask - then answer.




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Post #1026640
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 12:41 AM
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Well, it all depends of your priorities isn't it? If money is the only reason that drives your decision, than hell yes get that info first place.

Personally, I prioritize my decision on human factors first based on a direct bilateral discussion(s). Are they reactive, passive, engaged or not? Passion is everything that makes me happy everyday. Money does not.

If i am happy at the end of the interview, I generally introduce the money question myself if not done already. I don't mentioned a figure since it all depends of the overall package, but I ask them to give me an indicator before meeting again.

As Jeff said, no one wants to loose his/her time just because of a stupid 'tabou' question that is 'How much'.

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Post #1026656
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 1:00 AM


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yes, if the job you going to take for money and not for charity.
The very first question to consultant...whats the offer and benefit they giving?


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Post #1026664
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 1:19 AM
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Very tricky question on when to bring the money situation up. I have always felt awkward about bringing it up myself and have always admired the nerve of those that do.

On the other side of the fence when appointing people I always think that you have to balance what you offer the new candidate compared to what others in the 'team' are getting. Just because someone is perhaps 'pushier' than another candidate when it comes to money does not necessarily mean that they are worth more. That is why I prefer having a set salary range, notified in advance. The aim then being to appoint at the lower end of the range. This saves money initially and also has an added benefit of allowing a candidate to progress through the range over a period of time within the organisation. The concern with appointing someone to the top of a salary range is that they have no where to go salary wise (apart from another job somewhere else). However I guess when hiring staff for fixed term consulatncy roles this is not such an issue though as they are expected to leave.

Getting back to the topic I think it is definitely preferrable to somehow agree salary in advance of any interview. I have turned down a job offer before (as I guess many others have) when there has been no movement from the bottom end of the salary range and thus me questioning some of my motives for taking the job in the first place. This is a waste of everyones time though I suppose it can be looked on in hindsight as interview practice....
Post #1026677
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 1:30 AM
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I'd say depends on the interview - first interview would be a big no for me, and second interview possibly. Always go in knowing what they are willing to offer for the role though.
What I find interesting is how many jobs in the UK are advertised at one salary, then when you apply you find out it's for far less...This seems to be across the IT spectrum, from c# development to DBA.><.
Post #1026681
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 2:38 AM


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I live in a country where changing job seems to be the only way to raise your salary.
So, yes, I talk about money in the interview and I don't want to lose my time just to discover after three interviews that they're offering far less than what I'm earning.


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Post #1026699
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 2:46 AM


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Jinx-640161 (11/26/2010)
What I find interesting is how many jobs in the UK are advertised at one salary, then when you apply you find out it's for far less...This seems to be across the IT spectrum, from c# development to DBA.><.


I think that the salary the recruitment consultants quote in the job listing is almost always the top possible rate that the client (the employer) would be willing to pay for an exceptional candidate. It is more of an 'attention grabber' - the offer will always be somewhere lower in the range.
Post #1026700
Posted Friday, November 26, 2010 2:52 AM
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I think that the salary the recruitment consultants quote in the job listing is almost always the top possible rate that the client (the employer) would be willing to pay for an exceptional candidate. It is more of an 'attention grabber' - the offer will always be somewhere lower in the range.

I don't see the need for false advertising with regards to salary. Perhaps when they have your details they can say - you don't have the xp's so we'd offer the lower range, but at the first phone call, before they know a thing about you they say oh, sorry the company is only paying x amount, x being several thousand lower than the lowest advertised amount.
I've also found that recruitment agents advertise jobs that don't even exist! Some sort of fishing exercise I suppose . All very frustrating.
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