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Toolbox - Where Did All My Space Go?

This is the first in a new series of blogs I am going to create talking about useful tools (mostly scripts) that I use frequently in my day-to-day life as a production DBA.  I work as a Work-From-Home DBA for a Remote DBA company, but 90+% of my job functions are the same as any other company DBA.

Many of these scripts come directly from blogs and articles created and shared by other members of the SQL Server community; some of them I have slightly modified and some I have lifted directly from those articles.  I will always give attribution back to the original source and note when I have made modifications.

How do I find these scripts, you may ask?


Google is still the top tool in my toolbox - it never ceases to amaze me what you can find by Googling an error number, or the snippet of a message, or simply an object name.

(Disclaimer - I use Google from familiarity but the occasions I have used Bing haven't shown much different results.)

--

The first script I want to share comes from MSSQLTips.com and was created by frequent MSSQLTip author Ken Simmons (Blog/@KenSimmons) - it shows the free space in each of the database files on the instance and default comes back sorted by free space descending:

--
/*
https://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/1510/script-to-determine-free-space-to-support-shrinking-sql-server-database-files/
*/
USE MASTER
GO 
 
CREATE TABLE #TMPFIXEDDRIVES (
DRIVE CHAR(1),
MBFREE INT) 
 
INSERT INTO #TMPFIXEDDRIVES
EXEC xp_FIXEDDRIVES 
 
CREATE TABLE #TMPSPACEUSED (
DBNAME VARCHAR(500),
FILENME VARCHAR(500),
SPACEUSED FLOAT) 
 
INSERT INTO #TMPSPACEUSED
EXEC( 'sp_msforeachdb''use [?]; Select ''''?'''' DBName, Name FileNme,
fileproperty(Name,''''SpaceUsed'''') SpaceUsed from sysfiles''') 
 
SELECT
C.DRIVE,
A.NAME AS DATABASENAME,
B.NAME AS FILENAME,
CASE B.TYPE
WHEN 0 THEN 'DATA'
ELSE TYPE_DESC
END AS FILETYPE,
CASE
WHEN (B.SIZE * 8 / 1024.0) > 1000
THEN CAST(CAST(((B.SIZE * 8 / 1024) / 1024.0) AS DECIMAL(18,2)) AS VARCHAR(20)) + ' GB'
ELSE CAST(CAST((B.SIZE * 8 / 1024.0) AS DECIMAL(18,2)) AS VARCHAR(20)) + ' MB'
END AS FILESIZE,
CASE
WHEN (B.SIZE * 8 / 1024.0) - (D.SPACEUSED / 128.0) > 1000
THEN CAST(CAST((((B.SIZE * 8 / 1024.0) - (D.SPACEUSED / 128.0)) / 1024.0) AS DECIMAL(18,2)) AS VARCHAR(20)) + ' GB'
ELSE CAST(CAST((((B.SIZE * 8 / 1024.0) - (D.SPACEUSED / 128.0))) AS DECIMAL(18,2)) AS VARCHAR(20)) + ' MB'
END AS SPACEFREE,
B.PHYSICAL_NAME
FROM SYS.DATABASES A
JOIN SYS.MASTER_FILES B
ON A.DATABASE_ID = B.DATABASE_ID
JOIN #TMPFIXEDDRIVES C
ON LEFT(B.PHYSICAL_NAME,1) = C.DRIVE
JOIN #TMPSPACEUSED D
ON A.NAME = D.DBNAME
AND B.NAME = D.FILENME
WHERE a.database_id>4
--and DRIVE = 'F'
ORDER BY (B.SIZE * 8 / 1024.0) - (D.SPACEUSED / 128.0) DESC

DROP TABLE #TMPFIXEDDRIVES 
 
DROP TABLE #TMPSPACEUSED
--

The result set displays like this:


--

I use this all of the time to troubleshoot space issues - not only to find out what is taking up space but also to see if there are files with excessive empty space that can be examined for cleanup.

http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/16/167911b7d66e2736356e5680d23bc9d5111120af5aada10bdb714c70874cc3b1.jpg

Do not willy-nilly shrink files - it causes all kinds of problems with file fragmentation and potentially with performance - but there are times where you just don't have any choice, and this is an easy way to find candidates.

--

Hope this helps!

Nebraska SQL from @DBA_ANDY

I’m a forty-something Microsoft SQL Server DBA of 15+ years, a devoted husband, and a father of three young boys. I have been a DBA at a public university, at a major bank, at a healthcare system, and I now work as a remote DBA with customers across the United States. I write and speak primarily about the tips and tricks that I discover along my SQL Server journey.

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