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Stairway to Columnstore Indexes Level 12: Clustered or Nonclustered?

By Hugo Kornelis,

The Series

This article is part of the Stairway Series: Stairway to Columnstore Indexes

SQL Server 2012 and later offer a very different type of index from the traditional b-tree, the in-memory columnstore index. These indexes use a column-based storage model, as well as a new 'batch mode' of query execution and can offer huge performance increases for certain workloads. But how are they built, how do they work, and why do they manage to have such a dramatic impact on performance? In this stairway, Hugo Kornelis explains all, with his usual mix of concise description and detailed demonstration.

The previous levels of this stairway describe details, features, and limitations of columnstore indexes in SQL Server. But they do not answer what should be the first question for every database professional: should columnstore indexes be used in my databases; on what tables should they be used; and should they be clustered or nonclustered columnstore indexes?

With SQL Server 2012, the latter question is not relevant; that version has only nonclustered columnstore indexes, so you can choose to use them or not. The limitations of this type of columnstore index in SQL Server 2012 have made adoption slow: many companies have chosen to forfeit the possible performance and storage benefits because they feel it is not worth the struggle to work around the limitations. In particular, the read-only limitation on tables with columnstore indexes was often seen as a huge problem. However, there are ways to alleviate this pain somewhat, as we will show later in this level.

If you look at the marketing slides surrounding the release of SQL Server 2014, or at the majority of blog posts and conference presentations, you might get the impression that the clustered columnstore index is so much better that it is the only choice, and that the only reason for not removing the nonclustered version from the product is backwards compatibility. That is not the case. There are definitely some cases where, even on SQL Server 2014, I would prefer a nonclustered columnstore index over a clustered one.

In this level, we will help you choose whether or not to use columnstore indexes, what tables to use them on, and what type to choose, by presenting a short summary overview of the two types of columnstore indexes, focusing on benefits, limitations, and workarounds.

The sample database

All sample code in this level uses Microsoft’s ContosoRetailDW sample database and builds upon the code samples from the previous levels. If you didn’t follow this stairway from the start, or if you did other tests in that database and are now concerned that this might impact the code in this level, you can easily rebuild the sample database. First, download the Contoso BI Demo Database from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=18279, choosing the ContosoBIdemoBAK.exe option that contains a backup file. After that, download the scripts attached to this article and execute the one appropriate for your system (either SQL Server 2012 or SQL Server 2014. If you are running SQL Server 2016, I suggest using the 2014 version of this script; keep in mind however that there have been significant changes in this newer version so many of the demo scripts in this stairway series will not work the same on SQL Server 2016. We will cover the changes in SQL Server 2016 in a later level). Do not forget to change the RESTORE DATABASE statement at the start: set the correct location of the downloaded backup file, and set the location of the database files to locations that are appropriate for your system.

Once the script has finished, you will have a ContosoRetailDW database in exactly the same state as when you had executed all scripts from all previous levels. (The only exceptions might be due to small variations in the index creation process that are impossible to avoid).

The read-only limitation

A nonclustered columnstore index in SQL Server 2012 makes the underlying table effectively read-only. In SQL Server 2014, the clustered columnstore index does not have this effect, but the nonclustered columnstore index still does. This can be a major blocker in many situations. But let’s not forget that the primary use case for columnstore indexes is for large tables in data warehouses, and most data warehouses use partitioning on their large fact tables in order to facilitate an easier data load process. Exactly this partitioning makes it a lot easier to use nonclustered columnstore indexes in data warehouses. And, although with more effort, partitioning can also be used to work around the read-only limitation in other situations.

The basic idea of this strategy is to order the fact table by, for instance, the order entry date, or another generally increasing column (e.g. an IDENTITY key column). New data is collected in a staging table that has the same structure and the same rowstore indexes as the fact table, but not the columnstore index – so this table can still be changed. Once all data is collected, the nonclustered columnstore index is added to the staging table; this will take some time to complete, but far less then rebuilding the columnstore index on the entire fact table would. After that, a technique called “partition switching” (explained in more detail below) is used to swap the data in the staging table with an empty partition in the fact table. This operation, which takes just a fraction of a second, effectively adds all data to the fact table and empties the staging table – which is now ready for the next iteration of the loading process.

There are basically two strategies to employ table partitioning as a workaround for the read-only limitation of nonclustered columnstore indexes:

  1. Align the partition ranges to the data load frequency. This means that if the ETL adds data to the data warehouse daily, you need a partition for each day; if you want just one partition per month you can load only once per month.The drawback of this is that you need to choose between infrequent data loads, or lots of partitions. This can make the individual partitions so small that they cannot fully benefit from columnstore indexes.
  2. Do not align the data load frequency to the partition ranges. So you can, for instance, load data every night, but still use monthly partitions.In order to implement this option, the load process has to be more complex. You start by swapping the most recent partition with an empty staging table, so that the data that was loaded before is in the staging table; then drop the nonclustered columnstore index on that staging table to make it updateable. After that you run the ETL process (adding new rows, and optionally even deleting or updating rows); then once more create the nonclustered columnstore index and do another partition swap to move the now updated data back in. You will also need an additional conditional branch in the ETL jobs to handle the less often occurring creation of a new partition.

In the description above, I mention a staging table. This is how you would typically use this technique in a pure data warehouse scenario. However, if you want to employ a nonclustered columnstore index on a very large table in an OLTP system, you can replace all mentions of the work “staging table” with “working table for current data”, and still use these techniques. A lot of operations in an OLTP system only need to access the most recent data, which would always be in the “working table for current data”. Reports and searches across all data have to combine the data in the working table with the data in the larger table that holds the older information and has a columnstore index. You might be tempted to create a single view that combines the two tables with a UNION ALL expression and then use that view in your reports and search queries; but beware that this prevents batch mode execution on SQL Server 2012. In level 10 you will find the (unfortunately not so simple) workaround to this issue.

Let’s first set up a version of our sample table that is partitioned. The sample database used in this stairway is actually much too small for this, so the end result will be very unrealistic. The partitions span three months each, way more than I would want for a real-world situation; and the number of rows per partition is still so small that we will get limited performance benefits. But it will at least work to illustrate the technique of incremental data loading by partition swapping. Running the code in listing 12-1 will create a partitioned version of the table, load it with a copy of the existing data, and create a nonclustered columnstore index on it. It also creates the staging table that we will use to show the data loading process.

USE ContosoRetailDW;
GO

-- Create the partition function for the large fact table
-- For this demo, partitions are three months in size (which is not realistic)
CREATE PARTITION FUNCTION pfDateKey (datetime) 
AS RANGE RIGHT
   FOR VALUES('20070101', '20070401', '20070701', '20071001',
              '20080101', '20080401', '20080701', '20081001',
              '20090101', '20090401', '20090701', '20091001',
              '20100101');

-- Create the partition scheme
-- (Partition swapping requires all partitions to be on the same filegroup)
CREATE PARTITION SCHEME psDateKey
AS PARTITION pfDateKey ALL TO ([PRIMARY]);

-- Create a new version of the FactOnlineSales table as a partitioned table
CREATE TABLE dbo.FactOnlineSales_Partitioned
   (OnlineSalesKey       int          NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1),
    DateKey              datetime     NOT NULL,
    StoreKey             int          NOT NULL,
    ProductKey           int          NOT NULL,
    PromotionKey         int          NOT NULL,
    CurrencyKey          int          NOT NULL,
    CustomerKey          int          NOT NULL,
    SalesOrderNumber     nvarchar(20) NOT NULL,
    SalesOrderLineNumber int          NULL,
    SalesQuantity        int          NOT NULL,
    SalesAmount          money        NOT NULL,
    ReturnQuantity       int          NOT NULL,
    ReturnAmount         money        NULL,
    DiscountQuantity     int          NULL,
    DiscountAmount       money        NULL,
    TotalCost            money        NOT NULL,
    UnitCost             money        NULL,
    UnitPrice            money        NULL,
    ETLLoadID            int          NULL,
    LoadDate             datetime     NULL,
    UpdateDate           datetime     NULL,
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_DimCurrency
        FOREIGN KEY(CurrencyKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimCurrency (CurrencyKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_DimCustomer
        FOREIGN KEY(CustomerKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimCustomer (CustomerKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_DimDate
        FOREIGN KEY(DateKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimDate (Datekey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_DimProduct
        FOREIGN KEY(ProductKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimProduct (ProductKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_DimPromotion
        FOREIGN KEY(PromotionKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimPromotion (PromotionKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_DimStore
        FOREIGN KEY(StoreKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimStore (StoreKey)
   )
ON psDateKey(DateKey);
GO

CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX ix_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned_ProductKey
ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Partitioned (ProductKey, DateKey)
ON psDateKey(DateKey);
GO

-- Populate the new table with a copy of the existing table
INSERT INTO dbo.FactOnlineSales_Partitioned
SELECT      DateKey, StoreKey, ProductKey, PromotionKey, CurrencyKey, CustomerKey,
            SalesOrderNumber, SalesOrderLineNumber, SalesQuantity, SalesAmount,
            ReturnQuantity, ReturnAmount, DiscountQuantity, DiscountAmount,
            TotalCost, UnitCost, UnitPrice, ETLLoadID, LoadDate, UpdateDate
FROM        dbo.FactOnlineSales;
GO

-- Build a columnstore index on it
CREATE NONCLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX NCI_FactOnlineSales_Partitioned
ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Partitioned
   (OnlineSalesKey, DateKey, StoreKey, ProductKey, PromotionKey, CurrencyKey,
    CustomerKey, SalesOrderNumber, SalesOrderLineNumber, SalesQuantity, SalesAmount,
    ReturnQuantity, ReturnAmount, DiscountQuantity, DiscountAmount, TotalCost,
    UnitCost, UnitPrice, ETLLoadID, LoadDate, UpdateDate);
GO

-- Create the staging table, as a "normal" (non-partitioned) table
-- Must have same layout, indexes, and constraints as the partitioned table
CREATE TABLE dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging
   (OnlineSalesKey       int          NOT NULL IDENTITY(1,1),
    DateKey              datetime     NOT NULL,
    StoreKey             int          NOT NULL,
    ProductKey           int          NOT NULL,
    PromotionKey         int          NOT NULL,
    CurrencyKey          int          NOT NULL,
    CustomerKey          int          NOT NULL,
    SalesOrderNumber     nvarchar(20) NOT NULL,
    SalesOrderLineNumber int          NULL,
    SalesQuantity        int          NOT NULL,
    SalesAmount          money        NOT NULL,
    ReturnQuantity       int          NOT NULL,
    ReturnAmount         money        NULL,
    DiscountQuantity     int          NULL,
    DiscountAmount       money        NULL,
    TotalCost            money        NOT NULL,
    UnitCost             money        NULL,
    UnitPrice            money        NULL,
    ETLLoadID            int          NULL,
    LoadDate             datetime     NULL,
    UpdateDate           datetime     NULL,
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Staging_DimCurrency
        FOREIGN KEY(CurrencyKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimCurrency (CurrencyKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Staging_DimCustomer
        FOREIGN KEY(CustomerKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimCustomer (CustomerKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Staging_DimDate
        FOREIGN KEY(DateKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimDate (Datekey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Staging_DimProduct
        FOREIGN KEY(ProductKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimProduct (ProductKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Staging_DimPromotion
        FOREIGN KEY(PromotionKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimPromotion (PromotionKey),
    CONSTRAINT FK_FactOnlineSales_Staging_DimStore
        FOREIGN KEY(StoreKey) REFERENCES dbo.DimStore (StoreKey)
   );
GO

CREATE CLUSTERED INDEX ix_FactOnlineSales_Staging_ProductKey
ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging (ProductKey, DateKey);
GO

CREATE NONCLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX NCI_FactOnlineSales_Staging
ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging
   (OnlineSalesKey, DateKey, StoreKey, ProductKey, PromotionKey, CurrencyKey,
    CustomerKey, SalesOrderNumber, SalesOrderLineNumber, SalesQuantity, SalesAmount,
    ReturnQuantity, ReturnAmount, DiscountQuantity, DiscountAmount, TotalCost,
    UnitCost, UnitPrice, ETLLoadID, LoadDate, UpdateDate);
GO

Listing 12-1: Create and fill a partitioned version of the sample table

Note that this script takes a long time to run, depending on your hardware it could be from five minutes to fifteen minutes or even more. It will also cause the demo database to grow to approximately 4 GB for the data file and 5.5 GB for the log file. You then have a partitioned table with the same data as the original FactOnlineSales table. It has a total of fourteen partitions; both the first and last are empty. Keeping at least one empty partition at each side of a partitioned table is a good idea, because this allows you to quickly create new partitions by splitting an empty partition.

The indexes have been modified to include the partitioning column, which is a requirement for partition switching. Because of this, the original primary key on the IDENTITY column can no longer be enforced and has been left out. (Frankly, if I had designed this table I would not have included an IDENTITY column at all; in a data warehouse with a star schema they add no value to the fact tables.)

With the partitioned table and the staging table in place, we can now run through a demo script to see how a typical ETL process might load new data into the staging table and then swap it into the full table. This is demonstrated in listing 12-2:

USE ContosoRetailDW;
GO

-- First, disable the columnstore index on the staging table, to allow changes
ALTER INDEX NCI_FactOnlineSales_Staging
    ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging DISABLE;
go

-- ===> START of simulation of the ETL job
-- (Simulated ETL: by using copy from Q1 of 2009 to Q1 of 2010)
INSERT INTO dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging
SELECT      DATEADD(year, 1, DateKey), StoreKey, ProductKey, PromotionKey,
            CurrencyKey, CustomerKey, SalesOrderNumber, SalesOrderLineNumber,
            SalesQuantity, SalesAmount, ReturnQuantity, ReturnAmount,
            DiscountQuantity, DiscountAmount, TotalCost, UnitCost, UnitPrice,
            ETLLoadID, LoadDate, UpdateDate
FROM        dbo.FactOnlineSales_Partitioned
WHERE       DateKey >= '20090101'
AND         DateKey < '20090401';
-- ===> END of simulation of the ETL job
GO

-- Rebuild the columnstore index on the now populated staging table
ALTER INDEX NCI_FactOnlineSales_Staging
    ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging REBUILD;
GO

-- Add a constraint to ensure we only have data for Q1 of 2010 (the "next" partition)
ALTER TABLE dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging
ADD CONSTRAINT CK_Correct_Partition
        CHECK (DateKey >= '20100101' AND DateKey < '20100401');

-- Split the empty tail-end partition into a partition for Q1 of 2010
-- (receives data), and a new empty tail-end partition
ALTER PARTITION SCHEME psDateKey
    NEXT USED [PRIMARY];
ALTER PARTITION FUNCTION pfDateKey()
    SPLIT RANGE ('20100401');
GO

-- Switch the staging table into the partition just created for Q1 of 2010
-- First find the correct partition number (using any date in the range)
DECLARE @Part int = $PARTITION.pfDateKey('20100101');
-- Then do the actual swap
ALTER TABLE dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging
SWITCH TO dbo.FactOnlineSales_Partitioned
       PARTITION @Part;
GO

-- Finally, drop the constraint we added for Q1 of 2010
DROP INDEX NCI_FactOnlineSales_Staging
ON dbo.FactOnlineSales_Staging;

Listing 12-2: Using partition swapping to work around the read-only limitation

Only two steps in listing 12-2 take time. The simulated ETL process takes the same time it would take in a regular rowstore scenario, and rebuilding the columnstore index on the staging table takes less time that it would to build or rebuild it on the entire table. The actual partition swapping is instantaneous, because SQL Server does this by merely swapping some pointers instead of moving all the data around.

Note that in this example the CHECK constraint that is needed to ensure that all data in the staging table is in the correct date range was added after the data was loaded and the columnstore index was already built. For a data warehouse with data load from a trusted source, this is the fastest way to handle this. However, if you use the staging table as a working table for current data in an OLTP scenario, the CHECK constraint should always be in place to prevent incorrect data from being stored in this table.

If you have a scenario that allows you to do your ETL as illustrated above, then you might find that a nonclustered columnstore index can be interesting on SQL Server 2012 despite the read-only limitation. And even on SQL Server 2014, this ETL trick might convince you to choose the nonclustered columnstore index over the clustered version.

Supported data types

Another important consideration to keep in mind when choosing between a clustered or a nonclustered columnstore index on SQL Server 2014 is the long list of restrictions on what columns can be allowed in columnstore indexes. For instance, computed columns or columns defined with the SPARSE attribute are not permitted in a columnstore index, and several data types are not allowed either.

Since a clustered columnstore index always includes all columns in the table, any column that is not permitted makes it impossible to create a clustered columnstore index on that table; however, you can still create a nonclustered columnstore index as long as you restrict the list of columns in the index to only those with a permitted data type. The code in listing 12-3 illustrates this difference:

USE ContosoRetailDW;
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.TestDatatypes
   (KeyCol int NOT NULL,
    DataCol_Supported varchar(500) NOT NULL,
    DataCol_Unsupported varchar(max) NOT NULL);
GO

-- Fails because of unsupported data type
CREATE CLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX ccix_Test
    ON dbo.TestDataTypes;
GO

-- Fails because of unsupported data type
CREATE NONCLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX ncix_Test
    ON dbo.TestDataTypes(KeyCol, DataCol_Supported, DataCol_Unsupported);
GO

-- Succeeeds because unsupported column is not included
CREATE NONCLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX ncix_Test
    ON dbo.TestDataTypes(KeyCol, DataCol_Supported);
GO

DROP TABLE dbo.TestDataTypes;
GO

Listing 12-3: Including only supported columns in a nonclustered columnstore index

If you run the code in listing 12-3 statement by statement, you will see that you get an error message when trying to create the clustered columnstore index. The first attempt to create a nonclustered columnstore index also fails, because it includes a column that uses a data type that is not supported for columnstore indexes. However, for the nonclustered columnstore index we at least have the option to omit that column from the column list and successfully create a nonclustered columnstore index on the other columns in the table. With a clustered columnstore index, we do not have that option; so if we really want to create a columnstore index on this table without losing the ability to update data, we will have to change the database design (e.g. by changing the data type, or by moving the offending column out to a separate table).

Modifications

If you followed along with the examples in level 5 and level 6, you will have realized that changing the data in a clustered columnstore index comes at a price. New data is added into an open deltastore, which is compressed when “full”; the data in it is probably not optimal for rowgroup elimination. Depending on your data load pattern you also run the risk of getting too many rowgroups with too few rows each. Deleting data, but also changing data, logically removes the rows from the compressed rowgroups, but the data is not physically removed. Remember that one of the reasons for the speed of columnstore indexes is the reduced I/O because of the compression – but if a large enough percentage of the compressed data is logically removed, we are actually doing more I/O instead of less to get the same amount of data. For example, let’s say you have 100 GB of data, and the columnstore index reduces the storage size to just 15 GB. But if you then delete 90% of your data, the columnstore index will still take up 15 GB, even though the uncompressed data size would now be 10 GB. And because updates are implemented as DELETE followed by INSERT, you would see similar patterns on tables that have lots of UPDATE operations.

In level 8 you saw that a reorganize operation does not address these issues. A rebuild of the index does physically remove the logically deleted data, at the price of using more time and resources. If you also want to optimize for rowgroup elimination, you will have to invest even deeper: you need to replace the clustered columnstore index with a clustered rowstore index, and then replace that once more with the original clustered columnstore index. This effectively means two full index rebuilds in succession (and the second rebuild must be forced to avoid parallelism if you want the best possible optimization).

If you really need the ability to continuously update data in a table and still want the benefits of a columnstore index on that table, then these issues are the price you have to pay. But if that price is too high, you might want to consider using a nonclustered columnstore index as the alternative. If you are able to set up a partitioning scheme that allows you to use the partition switching technique described earlier, you’ll never have to reorganize or rebuild the columnstore index; you only create the columnstore index once for each partition. But nothing comes for free, in this case the price is a much clumsier update process, and having to write a more complex query if you also want to include the most recent data without losing batch mode execution.

Other indexes

Another very relevant limitation of columnstore indexes in SQL Server 2014 is that they do not allow any other index to exist on the same table. Especially in any workload that mixes pure reporting and warehousing type queries with more transactional work, such as looking up single rows or working on very small subsets of large tables, you may find that columnstore indexes are not well suited for this type of work.

If you need to fetch just a single row from a table that has billions of rows and only a columnstore index, then the only option for finding that row is to scan that index. Sure, all optimizations to eliminate columns and rowgroups will kick in, and the segments that still need to be processed are compressed. But a lot of data is, even after compression, still a lot of data, and reading all that will take time, and it is usually way more time than a simple lookup of a single rows in a traditional rowstore index would ever take.

With a nonclustered columnstore index (both in SQL Server 2012 and in SQL Server 2014), you can eat your cake and have it, too. The nonclustered columnstore index is simply one additional index on the same table. Apart from the read-only limitation, it does not impose any restrictions on that table; that table can still have a clustered rowstore index and as many nonclustered rowstore indexes as you want. And the optimizer is, in most cases, smart enough to look at your query, look at the available indexes, and choose to use one of the rowstore indexes if a very small selection of data is needed; or use the columnstore index if your query has to process so much data that scanning that index starts to get less expensive than retrieving the data from the rowstore indexes.

If you are on SQL Server 2014 and choose to create a clustered columnstore index instead of the nonclustered version, you will get an error message if there are any rowstore indexes on the table. You will also be unable to create them later. If you want to have both rowstore indexes and a columnstore index on the same table, then a nonclustered columnstore index is your only choice. This behavior is illustrated by the code in listing 12-4.

USE ContosoRetailDW;
GO

CREATE TABLE dbo.TestIndex
   (KeyCol int NOT NULL,
    DataCol int NOT NULL);
GO

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX nix_Test
    ON dbo.TestIndex(DataCol);
GO

-- Fails because clustered columnstore index cannot coexist with rowstore index
CREATE CLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX ccix_Test
    ON dbo.TestIndex;
GO

-- A nonclustered columnstore index can still be created
CREATE NONCLUSTERED COLUMNSTORE INDEX ncix_Test
    ON dbo.TestIndex (KeyCol, DataCol);
GO

DROP TABLE dbo.TestIndex;
GO

Listing 12-4: Clustered columnstore index cannot be combined with other indexes

Because a rowstore index cannot be created on a clustered columnstore, PRIMARY KEY and UNIQUE constraints (which are enforced by an automatically created rowstore index) are also not permitted on any table with a clustered columnstore. In addition, it is also impossible for a table with a clustered columnstore index to participate in a FOREIGN KEY relationship, neither as the referencing nor as the referenced table. None of these restrictions apply to the nonclustered version of the columnstore index.

When you want to use a columnstore index on SQL Server 2014, you can choose to use a nonclustered columnstore index which prevents all updates, or a clustered columnstore index which allows updates but does not support most constraints, so you run the risk of allowing bad data into the database. Neither is perfect; which is the lesser of evils can be different for each situation. If data quality is a major concern, then a nonclustered columnstore index, again with the partition switching method to work around the read-only limitation, might be a better choice than a clustered columnstore.

Storage size

A huge benefit of the clustered columnstore index over the nonclustered columnstore index is that this index is the only copy of the data. The nonclustered columnstore index, like every other nonclustered index, is stored as an additional copy of the data. Sure, it compresses very well. But if the original data is 4 TB and the compressed copy in the nonclustered columnstore index is only 1.5 TB, we have still increased the total storage size to 5.5 TB. Whereas, if the original data is replaced by a clustered columnstore index of 1.5 TB, we have reduced the total data size by 2.5 TB. (And since all other rowstore indexes have to be dropped, as described above, the actual space saving might even be bigger).

Conclusion

The introduction of the clustered columnstore index in SQL Server 2014 was a major step forward. There is no denying that this version of the columnstore index is for many scenarios much better suited than the nonclustered columnstore index; and the removal of the read-only limitation is the biggest selling point of both the clustered columnstore index and (if you are now running SQL Server 2012) of upgrading to SQL Server 2014. However, there are ways to alleviate the pains of the read-only limitation, changing it from a showstopper to an annoying factor. And there are cases where that factor might be less important than other factors. If, in such a case, the other factors favor a nonclustered columnstore index, then this is still an option even when you are already running on SQL Server 2014.

This concludes the coverage of columnstore indexes in SQL Server 2012 and SQL Server 2014, which was originally the scope of this stairway. However, SQL Server 2016 has been available for more than a half year already, and it includes a huge number of major changes to the options and restrictions for columnstore indexes. In the next and final level of this stairway, we will take a brief look at the most important of these changes.

 

Resources:

Setup Level 9 (SQL Server 2012).sql | Columnstore Stairway, level 12.zip

This article is part of the Stairway to Columnstore Indexes Stairway

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