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Will SQL Server 2000 run on Win Server 2008 R2? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, April 29, 2010 12:20 PM
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Don't beat up on me, but we still run SQL2K on Win Server 2003. It pretty well meets our needs and it's been easier just not to ever update.

As part of a major server purchase (major for us that is -- probably 3 servers), we'll get Win Server 2008 R2 (probably Datacenter Edition) using a shared storage array. So will our SQL2K (Standard Edition) run on it? Or will we need to update SQL now?

(I know there's quite often a difference between "officially supported" and "it will work" so I'm thinking maybe that exists in this case.)

I found this reference http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa176565(SQL.80).aspx but it predates Win Server 2008 so it can't answer the question.

Thanks for any answer. We're having a meeting this afternoon so quick info, even if incomplete, will be appreciated even if I have to wait longer for definitive info.



Post #913172
Posted Thursday, April 29, 2010 2:29 PM
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Never mind - in the meeting the boss decided to update to SQL 2008.


Post #913272
Posted Thursday, April 29, 2010 3:14 PM


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wodom (4/29/2010)
Never mind - in the meeting the boss decided to update to SQL 2008.



That is a better choice.




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Post #913283
Posted Friday, April 30, 2010 6:20 AM


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Better choice indeed. SQL 2k8 gives you so many more options that 2k. But you will have a LOT of code & stuff to upgrade, so get ready to work hard.


Brandie Tarvin, MCITP Database Administrator

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Post #913613
Posted Friday, April 30, 2010 6:33 AM


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Actually, the amount of T-SQL to update will depend greatly on how close the development team followed best practices. My organization recently upgraded from SQL 2000 to SQL 2008 with literally less than 10 code changes on a database of over 5,000 objects. The database has been operating without any problems for roughly a month now.

I would recommend running the SQL Upgrade Advisor to give you some idea of the impact on your situation in regard to length of time. From my past experience, ANSI-style JOINs, if you have them, are the most common problem to fix, as they are not supported in 2008.

SQL Server 2008 Upgrade Advisor can be found here:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=f5a6c5e9-4cd9-4e42-a21c-7291e7f0f852&displaylang=en

Good luck!
Post #913622
Posted Friday, April 30, 2010 10:31 AM


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Great advice from Nabidavid.

Good practices in coding seem to dramatically reduce a lot of maintenance and upgrade work.

Use of the Upgrade advisor will help you in your planning for the upgrade.




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Post #913888
Posted Monday, May 3, 2010 1:26 PM
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Brandie Tarvin (4/30/2010)
But you will have a LOT of code & stuff to upgrade, so get ready to work hard.


I hope not. The only real reason we're upgrading is to get high availability due to a hardware server crash last week (disk controller), that resulted in 11 hours of downtime, about 4 of which were due to the master database being corrupted. We could "sort of" afford that kind of downtime in the past, but not any more -- not in the daytime anyway. Fortunately (unless you count lost sleep) this one was all at night.

Most of the actual SQL code is generated & issued by a 3rd party application, and it would be impractical or impossible to change most of it. Most of that is inserts and updates, with some reporting.

Most of the reporting functions we wrote ourselves, but mostly it was other people so I don't know what kind of joins are prevalent. I suppose we might have to ultimately stick with a previous version of SQL. (But I still don't know if those versions will run on Win 2008 R2.)

I looked at the Advisor download page, but it doesn't go into details about how it gathers data. Is it a static inspection of the DB and the code stored therein, or does it watch the real-time SQL statement flow a la the Profiler? Most of our reporting queries are sent by external code in MS Access and Visual Basic.



Post #914914
Posted Monday, May 3, 2010 1:43 PM
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nabidavid (4/30/2010)
From my past experience, ANSI-style JOINs, if you have them, are the most common problem to fix, as they are not supported in 2008.


After reading a couple of articles, I presume you meant to say NON ANSI-style JOINs are not supported.



Post #914928
Posted Monday, May 3, 2010 2:50 PM


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Yes, you are correct. I meant Non-Ansi style joins.

In the recent upgrade at our organization, we actually had a few of these JOINs. A few years ago, with a 2000 to 2005 upgrade, I ran into the same problem as well. Like your situation, the databases were actually designed by third-parties.

In the recent upgrade to 2K8, we did experience a few more minor problems which were discovered during testing that the Upgrade Advisor did not detect. However, these few problems were handled within a day or two. Just wanted to send the friendly reminder to thoroughly test beforehand.



Post #914954
Posted Monday, May 3, 2010 2:55 PM


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I looked at the Advisor download page, but it doesn't go into details about how it gathers data. Is it a static inspection of the DB and the code stored therein, or does it watch the real-time SQL statement flow a la the Profiler? Most of our reporting queries are sent by external code in MS Access and Visual Basic.


Actually, you can run your own profiler trace which can be imported into the Upgrade Advisor. However, the Upgrade Advisor does not run the trace for you.
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