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Are the posted questions getting worse? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 7:58 AM


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Revenant (6/24/2013)
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Post #1467164
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 8:21 AM


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Stefan Krzywicki (6/25/2013)
Strange as it may seem in this day and age of cheap HD space, there are still places that refuse to provide enough space for their data forcing desperate people to use DBCC SHRINKFILE


Yes, our SAN admins still look at me like I'm mad when I ask for 100GB of extra storage on their £200k+ SAN. Attitudes to data seem to be stuck in the past and I think a lot of people are getting caught out by the recent explosion in data.

I use exponential curves to forecast disk usage on data warehouses now as there's no business appetite to (ever) archive data and new data sources pop up all the time. I'd rather have one argument about why we need to buy and reserve 30TB of database storage in the next 3 years than a hundred about the odd 100GB here and there.

Btw, was great to meet Grant and Steve last Friday. I must make an effort to attend more events! Unfortunately, there was problem at work and I had to bail before lunch, so missed out on seeing Gail (and a free beer!).
Post #1467187
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 10:23 AM


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HowardW (6/25/2013)
Stefan Krzywicki (6/25/2013)
Strange as it may seem in this day and age of cheap HD space, there are still places that refuse to provide enough space for their data forcing desperate people to use DBCC SHRINKFILE


Yes, our SAN admins still look at me like I'm mad when I ask for 100GB of extra storage on their £200k+ SAN. Attitudes to data seem to be stuck in the past and I think a lot of people are getting caught out by the recent explosion in data.

I use exponential curves to forecast disk usage on data warehouses now as there's no business appetite to (ever) archive data and new data sources pop up all the time. I'd rather have one argument about why we need to buy and reserve 30TB of database storage in the next 3 years than a hundred about the odd 100GB here and there.

Btw, was great to meet Grant and Steve last Friday. I must make an effort to attend more events! Unfortunately, there was problem at work and I had to bail before lunch, so missed out on seeing Gail (and a free beer!).


You'd think disk space came directly out of some SAN Admins paycheck.
And the many discussions about having enough free space to recover the main warehouse.
Thousands of $'s wasted in time and workarounds vs. doing it right.
Especially important when the data center went remote.
It's not like you can just plug something in to work with temporarily.
Post #1467271
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 1:48 PM


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Jan Van der Eecken (6/14/2013)
dwain.c (6/13/2013)
Sean Lange (6/13/2013)
WayneS (6/13/2013)
dwain.c (6/12/2013)
I can only imagine what it must be like to have SQL Server running in some non-English language. MS probably translated the obtuse into the indecipherable.


Maybe the error messages are perfect in other languages, and it's only when in English that they become so obtuse.


That makes a lot of sense. It does seem like some of the error messages where written in Swahili first and then translated to English by a non-native speaker.


More likely the base language is Klingon.


BTW, Sean, it is called kiSwahili. You'd come across as quite rude if you call it Swahili. Just had to mention it in case you ever make it to Kenya or Tanzania.

That's somewhat amazing, on two counts. First, I've never seen Kiswahili written with a small k and capital S before. Second, those Swahili speakers must be extremely reasy to take offense - ready, in fact, to an extend which I simply do not believe.

When was the last occassion on which, when speaking (or writing) English, you said (or wrote) Gaeilge instead or Irish or Gàidhlig instead of Gaelic or Gaelk instead of Manx or Français instead of French or castellano instead of Spanish or galego instead of Galician or Deutsch instead of German or used any language's name for itself instead of its name in the language you were speaking? On all the occassions when you referred to one of those languages (or any other language) by its non-native name were you being offensive? When an Italian says "Io non parlo inglese" instead of "Io non parlo English" is he being offensive?

I realise that roots in Bantu languages are almost never used in those languages without prefixes, but it is normal practise in English (and in most other European languages) when naming the most common Bantu languages to use the root on its own as the name of the language (of course in those Bantu languages where the gender/class of nouns denoting languages is indicated by a zero prefix the speakers of those languages do the same) ; so for example we say Ganda and Swahili and Tswana and Sotho and Xhoso and Zulu, not Oluganda, Kiswahili, Setswana, Sesotho, Isixhosa, and Isizulu. In the case of most of these languages, there is a certainty of confusion if the root is used on its own when speaking in the language, since many other words are formed from the root using different prefixes (for example words for a country, for a person or people of that country, and so on, but of course we get round that by not using the root alone for those other meanings (eg we use Botswana for the country, which is the Tswana word; and use nouns/adjectives formed by normal English rules for the cases where we don't just add the appropriate Tswana prefix - although I've heard motswana and batswana used in English for Botswanan person and Botswanan people; Similarly Uganda for the country, Buganda for the region where Ganda is the dominant language, and so on).

Is there any reason for Swahili speakers to be really hung up on wanting that prefix "ki" to be used when referring to the language in English? If there is, would that give us Gaels an excuse to insist that all English speakers learn to pronounce (and of course spell) the language names "Gàidhlig na h-Alba", "Gaeilge", "Gaoluinn Mumhain", and "Gaelk Vannin" since those four names are the names we use in our three languages for those three languages? How much fun should we all have with languages whose names include sounds which don't occurr in English, and languages that distinguish two sounds that appear to English-trained ears to be the same and use both those sounds in their name for the language?


Tom
Post #1467364
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 2:21 PM


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No idea about Swahili, since it's not native to my neck of the world, but Zulu is correctly written as isiZulu when writing in the language, not Isizulu. It's similar for most proper nouns in that language. Xhosa's the same.

For example
Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika
(Xhosa)

Thina, bantu baseNingizimu Afrika
(Zulu)

Sotho on the other hand has the first letter capitalised, I've never seen otherwise.




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Post #1467379
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 2:53 PM


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Yikes. I often tell people, "I only know one language, but I'm not fluent". Now I have even more reason to do so.

Chad
Post #1467389
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 3:01 PM


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Chad Crawford (6/25/2013)
Yikes. I often tell people, "I only know one language, but I'm not fluent". Now I have even more reason to do so.

Chad


No kidding. One light hearted English-centric joke and look what I started.


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Post #1467390
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 3:12 PM


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Chad Crawford (6/25/2013)
Yikes. I often tell people, "I only know one language, but I'm not fluent". Now I have even more reason to do so.


My ability with Zulu and Sotho is limited to polite greetings and farewells. I can't speak either of them.



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Post #1467395
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 5:27 PM


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GilaMonster (6/25/2013)
No idea about Swahili, since it's not native to my neck of the world, but Zulu is correctly written as isiZulu when writing in the language, not Isizulu. It's similar for most proper nouns in that language. Xhosa's the same.

For example
Nkosi sikelel' iAfrika
(Xhosa)

Thina, bantu baseNingizimu Afrika
(Zulu)

Sotho on the other hand has the first letter capitalised, I've never seen otherwise.


Thanks Gail. That's useful to know. Obviously I've been relying on unreliable sources as far as Zulu and Xhosaare concerned. I guess material that generalises about Bantu languages is about as reliable as material that generalises about Romance or Germanic, ie not terribly reliable when it talks about an individual language of which the author has no first hand knowledge, so I feel something of an idiot having fallen into the trap of believing what I read depite knowing that some of it would be arbitrary generalisation. I guess I was fooled by not spotting any errors in it (if I had seen errors even 2% as dense as in Bill Bryson's "Mother Tongue", for example, I would have assumed it was totally untrustworthy; but that would have required me to know enough to notice the errors, which on Bantu languages I certainly don't). Apologies for posting incorrect stuff that I hadn't properly checked. But I don't think my errors there detract from the point that the English for isiZulu is Zulu, and similarly for isiXhosa.

Sotho and Tswana I have first hand experience of (don't speak or read or write them, but have been in enough contact with them in the past to know some of the rules of writing) and they definitely don't capitalise the root instead of the prefix. For Swahili I have forgotten pretty much all I once knew (that was never very much anyway, so no real loss, and it was about 45 years ago that I last had any contact with the language) so I relied on the swahili wikipedia article on the language which contains many phrases with the word Kiswahili in them, e.g. "kuna gazeti moja tu la Kiswahili;", which clearly have capitalisation the same as the Sotho/Tswana languages (or dialects - I don't want to get into the argument about whether the various Sothos and Tswana are separate languages unless "SA and Botswana each have an army" is a good enough line to end the argument ).


Tom
Post #1467407
Posted Tuesday, June 25, 2013 5:28 PM


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Chad Crawford (6/25/2013)
Yikes. I often tell people, "I only know one language, but I'm not fluent". Now I have even more reason to do so.

Chad

Me too, having seen Gail's message.


Tom
Post #1467408
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