Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase

What does FN mean? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 11:04 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, September 10, 2010 3:14 AM
Points: 13, Visits: 56
Hi ,

i found the following code snippet:
{ fn WEEK(Created) }

It does select the week from a date.
The fucntion week is not supported by t-sql.
only when i use the keyword FN before it is supported.

Know my question?
What does FN mean and where is the function week implemented?

regards martin
Post #499835
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 11:36 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 9:12 PM
Points: 1,389, Visits: 6,316
Seems like an ODBC-function.
Post #499863
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 12:55 PM


SSCrazy

SSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazy

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 6:36 AM
Points: 2,397, Visits: 3,405
DATEPART(WEEK, Col1)



N 56°04'39.16"
E 12°55'05.25"
Post #499913
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 1:47 PM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, September 10, 2010 3:14 AM
Points: 13, Visits: 56
is FN a synonym for datepart???
Post #499947
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 1:50 PM


SSCrazy

SSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazy

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 6:36 AM
Points: 2,397, Visits: 3,405
No. FN makes your connection resort to ODBC level calls and use the WEEK function and calculate the week value for created column.
It will be faster to use DATEPART(WEEK, Created) instead.



N 56°04'39.16"
E 12°55'05.25"
Post #499948
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 6:58 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 6:46 PM
Points: 36,944, Visits: 31,446
Peter, any idea where I can get a list of these ODBC functions?

--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #500134
Posted Tuesday, May 13, 2008 11:41 PM


SSCrazy

SSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazySSCrazy

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 13, 2014 6:36 AM
Points: 2,397, Visits: 3,405
This would be a starter
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb630290(SQL.100).aspx

Interbase can give you some clues
http://www.ibprovider.com/eng/documentation/odbc_escape_sequences_eng.html



N 56°04'39.16"
E 12°55'05.25"
Post #500182
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase

Permissions Expand / Collapse