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SQL Server Adventures for the Oracle DBA Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, October 19, 2006 7:41 AM
Grasshopper

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Last Login: Monday, December 09, 2013 8:19 PM
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I have had similar challenges but just the reverse.  I started in SQL Server 7 and had to work in Oracle 8i.  I have been burnt several times by the limited tools which Oracle provides and get frustrated with how much longer it takes to do the same things in Oracle.  I have been burnt by Oracle DBA Studio to change a password which never happened and looking up a constraint which Oracle DBA Studio displayed the incorrect fields which the constraint was on.  Oracles tools take forever to load, if they do load, as they have been written in Java.

Oracle seems to work best if you do everything through SQL Plus but who has the time or the budget?  I really don't wish to bash Oracle and many people swear by it. I wish I could be one of them but I find myself swearing at it most of the time.

I am glad you were able to turn your situation around and have a positive outcome.  It is helpful for an individual to work with more than one vendors database product.  You know more about the challenges and advantages of using one database over the other.

Good Luck




Post #316598
Posted Thursday, October 19, 2006 8:31 AM
Grasshopper

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I'm a bit divided on this one. On one hand, I think you should have quit your job the first day you were yelled at, I can't stand experienced (and very often not so experienced!) developers who refuse to teach anything to their less experienced peers. It's not like they were born experts.

On the other hand, that painful experience forced you to learn things you probably wouldn't have even thought about if the DBAs were in charge of creating all tables/DTS packages/stored procs/etc. So in the end it was good for you, but was it necessary? I don't know.

It all comes down to the age old debate between the people who think the best way to learn how to swim is through gradual lessons, starting at the shallow end of the pool and slowly moving to the deep end, and the ones who think the best way is to just throw you into a turbulent river hoping that your survival instinct will take over and force you to swim. Some will say the last method creates better swimmers, but others will point out that it will also drown quite a few.
Post #316631
Posted Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:00 PM
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I did SQL Server --> Oracle and now I'm back to SQL Server (3 jobs).

I have no doubt that SQL Server would be but a footnote in database books if Oracle had taken the initiative to develop a user-centric front end for their dbms in the 90s.  I honestly never could figure out what they must've been thinking when I was working with Oracle.

Thank God they didn't work on the front end.  I love sql server.




Post #316730
Posted Thursday, October 19, 2006 12:01 PM
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Regarding last post.... survival of the fittest!!!

I prefer the crash course style, if you get thrown into a tough environment your learning curve is perfect!!

Post #316733
Posted Monday, October 23, 2006 7:51 AM
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Ah, table variables.  Yes I see what you mean.  However, I should point out that they DO take up space in tempdb, and have a few other side effects.  eg You don't get statistics on table variables, which can lead to interesting things like no paralellism (ll?) in queries. 

 




Post #317295
Posted Thursday, October 26, 2006 8:08 AM
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good article, sounds like it was valuable, if difficult experience.  I spent years on DB2 before getting (accidentally) into SQL Server (and sometimes feel like I've been downgraded from a Rolls Royce to a Toyota Tazz - sshhhhhhhhh... ).  Cursors are well-implemented in DB2 & obviously in Oracle as well so I tend to say that it's not using cursors that is a bad thing, but Ms's bad implementation of them.

Interesting that you had to do so much DBA work - I think things tend to be a bit more formal on the 'bigger' db's, with more clearly defined roles, & the bigger SQL Server gets, the more SS installations will have to move in that direction.  I still trip over things that I think ought to be there and aren't - mainly automation and operational processing things, like automatically allocating the resources needed to recover a db.

Sounds like you survived anyway

 

Caroline

 

Post #318323
Posted Tuesday, November 14, 2006 6:24 PM
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It would be nice to merge the best of breed from both languages. 

How much longer will it take Oracle to replace dbms_output.put_line with a simple PRINT statement that has no limits on chars per session.

On the other hand I like the better control of trigger firing in Oracle unfortunately instead-of triggers on tables don't exist.

The list goes on and on ...

I cannot imagine how anyone could write large pl/sql programs in SQLPLUS. Toad, even if it crashes regurlarly and costs a fair bit of money these days, is a god send.

I find it takes several hours when switching from Oracle to Sql Svr or vice versa before I stop making silly mistakes. It's comforting to know I am not the only one stuggling to adjust to the other RDBMS.

Cheers,

Win

 




Post #322881
Posted Sunday, December 03, 2006 8:08 AM
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I enjoyed your article as I'm struggling thru the forest heading in the other direction.  I believe there is a need out there for a series of books "Database A for the Database B Developer/DBA".  The series should include helpful tips like a comparison between isnull and nvl.  One thing I found is that a SQL Server isnull(value, '') will return a zero-length string if the value is null where as an Oracle nvl(value, '') seems to return a null.  I'm guessing that Oracle doesn't like zero-length string???

Ona another note -- people that will yell at you without training you are generally not confident or competent in their supposed area of expertice.  They are generally threatened by your questions and are trying to get rid of you.  While it's tough to be in a situation like that, you should take it as a back-handed compliment.  You knew something they didn't and figured out what they new.  You walked out of that situation with twice the knowledge.  That shows character that is worth it's weight in gold.  BTW -- are you looking for work



--Paul Hunter
Post #327257
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