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Consolidation of SQl2008R2 servers to SQL2012? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, December 17, 2013 9:43 AM


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Just to give you an idea of the work involved in your request...

When I was still consulting I got a request to quote for consolidation of three SQL Servers into one. Three, not the 25 you have. I conducted a full day meeting with the business owner explaining what would go into the consolidation project, the notes on what would be required and the process took about 5 full A4 pages of notes. I quoted a period of 3 weeks to implement benchmarks, analyse results, test and finally implement the consolidation, that's above and beyond the selecting and purchasing of hardware for the final server.

What you're asking is not 10 minutes of work, it's likely to be a 3-4 month project for a top-level database consultant.

Edit: Since you want to upgrade as well, add another couple of months for testing of all of those applications on 2012 and fixing anything that breaks (something always does)



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Post #1523778
Posted Tuesday, December 17, 2013 12:48 PM


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Other key considerations that factor into consolidation:

Security - do any apps have fixed server roles like sysadmin as requirements, those usually have to be segregated
Tempdb Usage - in a consolidated server instance, you only get one, so if there is a lot of usage, that can equate to a lot of contention and problems if you don't plan it correctly
Cross Database Dependencies - do groups of databases have to be on the same server for an application to function?
SSIS/Reporting Dependencies - are there SSIS packages or Reports that access multiple databases, that would require changing if you consolidate?

For the VM stuff, unless you know your host configurations, other VM configurations, and the subscription ratios it is next to impossible to expect any kind of performance requirement would be met from a VM.


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Post #1523861
Posted Wednesday, December 18, 2013 5:53 AM


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I also agree with the others. It isn't as simple as we have 25 servers and want to consolidate down to one.. now do it..

You have to find out what each of these do, what usage they have, what is their most stressful time of day.... you might not be able to consolidate them all down to one. YOu also need to look and see if there are any linked servers from one to another. There are a TON of things to highly consider.



Post #1524073
Posted Thursday, December 19, 2013 8:28 AM
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Why consolidate when you can virtualize and license SQL at the Host level? Maybe several new Cisco UCS-B200-M3 Blades and a nice SAN back end could be in your future (VMware clustered of course)?

We recently completed a yearlong project to “get off” a now unsupported HP Polyserve environment (using VMware) and have no regrets. Like the experts above recommend you can’t just throw this together and expect it to perform without proper design, analysis and testing; however, it is possible depending upon your business requirements and your current environment. An added benefit would be that hardware upgrades will be a piece of cake after you virtualize and you might be able to save some money in SQL licensing too. When you need more power add another B200 to the VM cluster and don’t scrimp on memory!!
Post #1524622
Posted Thursday, December 19, 2013 10:26 AM


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DeWayne_McCallie (12/19/2013)
Why consolidate when you can virtualize and license SQL at the Host level?


That's a form of consolidation, multiple physical machines being consolidated into multiple virtual machines on a smaller number of hosts. You still need to do all the baselining, all the analysis, all the testing.

Part of a consolidation project would be to decide whether the consolidation is into multiple databases on an instance, multiple instances on a server or multiple VMs on a host or some combination thereof.



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