Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««123»»

What Do You Want to Learn? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Friday, November 8, 2013 9:56 AM
Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 2:16 PM
Points: 320, Visits: 966

A talk about how to determine the right tool for the job.
Or a talk about the appropriate use cases for certain new features and examples of (common?) incorrect application of certain new features.

It is not always a matter of knowing all the new features, but to be able to determine whether they are applicable to the problem at hand.

What we often see is that features can get overused because they make the coding easy (e.g. table variables, CTEs) but they may have unforseen consequences.

What are some newer examples of this kind of thing?
Post #1512744
Posted Friday, November 8, 2013 2:41 PM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, June 18, 2014 11:15 AM
Points: 2, Visits: 20
BI.
Post #1512820
Posted Friday, November 8, 2013 3:36 PM
SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, September 2, 2014 10:02 AM
Points: 1,616, Visits: 234
I'd like to learn SSIS.
Post #1512835
Posted Friday, November 8, 2013 5:54 PM


Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, May 16, 2014 4:41 PM
Points: 20, Visits: 106
SQL 2012 Reporting Services - SSDS and Visual Studio - Development of reports to be embedded in ASP.NET web app or published on web via a viewer
Post #1512872
Posted Friday, November 8, 2013 8:59 PM
SSChasing Mays

SSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing MaysSSChasing Mays

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, November 18, 2014 11:25 AM
Points: 637, Visits: 2,143
My list is still too long. ive done a couple SQLSaturdays and quite enjoyed them, and i always learn a lot of new things, but their other effect is always to remind me how much about SQL server I still DON'T know.

As it pertains to my current job, top priority is learning all the SSAS/SSIS I can, especially best practices around team development in those areas.

But on a personal level, I want to sharpen my query/programmability optimization skills. I know a lot (much of it from reading and participating here) about tricks on writing better queries and such, but still a newb when it comes to actually breaking down execution plans, and analyzing performance of queries.


Post #1512881
Posted Saturday, November 9, 2013 5:27 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 5:34 PM
Points: 35,609, Visits: 32,200
arnipetursson (11/8/2013)

A talk about how to determine the right tool for the job.


Very cool. I'll start with a bit of a play on words. "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T."


What we often see is that features can get overused because they make the coding easy (e.g. table variables, CTEs) but they may have unforseen consequences.

What are some newer examples of this kind of thing?


POWERSHELL.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1512942
Posted Saturday, November 9, 2013 10:17 PM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 4:47 PM
Points: 181, Visits: 423
Our budget at work is very tight. No money for any conferences nor any training. The possibilities of lay offs are very real. Last year we had our first SQL Saturday; the only training I'll get this year is another SQL Saturday, if we have one, plus what I can learn online.


Rod
Post #1512948
Posted Monday, November 11, 2013 9:05 AM
Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: 2 days ago @ 2:16 PM
Points: 320, Visits: 966
Jeff Moden (11/9/2013)
arnipetursson (11/8/2013)

A talk about how to determine the right tool for the job.


Very cool. I'll start with a bit of a play on words. "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T."



Very similar to my mantra (different meaning of course): "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean it's a good idea!"

I have to disagree with you on Powershell though.
Because of issues with SCOM, I created a whole suite of powershell scripts for my monitoring and admin needs.
Allowed me to have a single set of scripts that I run from one place, and all I have to do when i set up a new server is add it to my server list tables and set up the login that runs the scripts.

Now I am even monitoring AWS MySQL instances with my scripts.

This is very similar to what i used to do with shell and perl in my previous life as a Sybase DBA.

The one gotcha I have come across with powershell is memory issues, particularly related with how it reads files.
Post #1513174
Posted Monday, November 11, 2013 9:42 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Yesterday @ 5:34 PM
Points: 35,609, Visits: 32,200
arnipetursson (11/11/2013)
Jeff Moden (11/9/2013)
arnipetursson (11/8/2013)

A talk about how to determine the right tool for the job.


Very cool. I'll start with a bit of a play on words. "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T."



Very similar to my mantra (different meaning of course): "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean it's a good idea!"

I have to disagree with you on Powershell though.
Because of issues with SCOM, I created a whole suite of powershell scripts for my monitoring and admin needs.
Allowed me to have a single set of scripts that I run from one place, and all I have to do when i set up a new server is add it to my server list tables and set up the login that runs the scripts.

Now I am even monitoring AWS MySQL instances with my scripts.

This is very similar to what i used to do with shell and perl in my previous life as a Sybase DBA.

The one gotcha I have come across with powershell is memory issues, particularly related with how it reads files.


I'm not suggesting that Powershell is a bad thing. Even I use it.

My response was because someone asked if something else had been abused like Recursive CTEs, Cursors, CLR, etc and the answer is "Yes"... like any shiney new object in SQL Server, Powershell has been seriously abused/misused. Most of the people that are doing the abusing seem to be those who know how to program and not much about SQL Server. There are a couple that do know SQL Server quite well but insist on doing simple things using Powershell just because they can.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1513182
Posted Monday, November 11, 2013 3:19 PM
Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, November 21, 2014 8:22 AM
Points: 1,310, Visits: 781
How to deal with Entity Framework (and the like) as a DBA. Performance fixing especially.
Post #1513279
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««123»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse