Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase 123»»»

The IT Explosion Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Monday, January 25, 2010 11:09 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Yesterday @ 8:51 PM
Points: 33,266, Visits: 15,431
Comments posted to this topic are about the item The IT Explosion






Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #853421
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 2:58 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, July 25, 2014 5:21 AM
Points: 1,205, Visits: 923

I don't begrudge people the chance to make a good living in technology, even if they don't have a passion for it. I would just like to have them to have a positive attitude, put in a little effort, and smile. Especially when you are asking for help.

Do you know what I love about my job? The fact that there are people sittin g out there who are experts in what they do and they take time to create some awesome scripts, articles, ebooks and they hand it out for free to those who want or need it to learn something. People that do not just do the job for the money they make but do whatever they can to help others
To come back to the quote from your editorial, if someone does not have a passion for this job then I'd rather have the newcomer work with me, even if they ask a lot of questions because I know I can help them to get a passion for this job.


Manie Verster
Developer
Johannesburg
South Africa

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me. - Holy Bible
I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times. - Everett Mckinley Dirkson (Well, I am trying. - Manie Verster)
Post #853472
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 5:01 AM
SSC Rookie

SSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC RookieSSC Rookie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 9:06 AM
Points: 34, Visits: 75
After programming for 10 years, going through burn out, and almost being divorced because of the long hours and stress, I have learned that always trying to move forward and stay ahead of the curve is not only damaging to our own health, but the health of our families. For all of you who are just starting out and are still gung ho....great! But for some of us, doing my job and collecting my paycheck so I can spend more time with my friends and family have now taken front and center.

I used to be the guy with the passion to stay ahead. Now I am just the guy that knows what he's doing, does it well, and does it as quickly as possible so I can spend time at home.

But, in a way I guess I have paid my dues. I worked my tail off and am now taking it a little easy. Atleast until the next big project comes up and then I will probably be back in over my head again.
Post #853528
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 5:46 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 7:27 AM
Points: 4, Visits: 18
This is not a phenomenon limited to technology. Most verticals are full of people that have risen to the level of their incompetence. In the binary world of computing it is just easier to spot.
Post #853549
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 6:49 AM
Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, December 2, 2013 6:30 AM
Points: 346, Visits: 691
I don't know, I think those without the passion and going through the motions are wasting their lives--and that's terribly sad. I know that I'm blessed with working in a field I have a consuming passion for, and I'm not saying you have to live and breathe this stuff 24/7, but you do have to *enjoy* it, at the very least.

If you're just surviving then you need to find something else, because this field will kill you from stress eventually if you don't--or cause lots of damage to your spirit.

Reality often sucks, it's true. Not everybody can pick and choose their work. I have no problem answering questions and helping those who want it. But like many of us the demands for a quick fix, or worse having me do some stranger's work for them, gets wearing after a while.

Bottom line, if you don't like doing this stuff, if it's a chore, then *run away*, very very fast. You'll be better off.
Post #853596
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 7:03 AM


Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 12:49 PM
Points: 11, Visits: 47
It's kind of analogous to those trying out for American Idol who think they can sing

The best minds are not in government. If any were, business would steal them away. ~Reagan
Post #853610
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 7:28 AM
Valued Member

Valued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued MemberValued Member

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, July 5, 2011 7:37 PM
Points: 58, Visits: 149
I've founnd that the delimiter is not passion but self confidence. It takes more self confidence to say "I don't know, but I'm willing to find out. Will you show me how?" than to scoff with disdain and say "I know everything else, I'm just too busy to be bogged down with this trivial detail. Now how do I do this again?"


Post #853629
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 7:31 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, December 12, 2013 1:09 PM
Points: 111, Visits: 541
We see the need for CAPTCHA technologies on various sites to prove the form is filled out by a human and not a computer. We need CAPTCHA-like technology to prove that certain questions are asked after following industry etiquette. I think this "CAPTCHA" is well-encapsulated by the concept of "due diligence." It's a good start, anyway.

I've got a really interesting SQLServerCentral link for you. It's the search for the term "due diligence" on SQLServerCentral: Have a look at it.

First, note that only 65 results are found. Maybe in 2010, we can ramp that up to 6,500. Note some of the quotes from the results: "I have done my due diligence so I would like feedback..." - Now that's good stuff. We need more of that.

My first professional job as a programmer put me in a small (12 or so) group of mid to senior-level programmers. Right away they let me know that there was etiquette when asking for help. Following it seemed natural. I was glad to know and follow the rules. It led to better relationships and made me feel better about learning from others.

The etiquette went something like this:

First, do some due diligence on your own. Second, be prepared to ask informed questions that demonstrate your due diligence. Third, go back and apply the advice on your own to demonstrate you're not asking someone to do your work for you. Repeat if necessary. The positive attitude component was a required given.

I think the etiquette I learned is fairly universal.

Since learning the etiquette, and helping ramp up junior-level team members, I pass this etiquette along - and enforce it - if you will.

That's fairly easy to do in-house. Doing that on the internet is a bigger challenge. But then again, maybe it's a matter slightly tweaking our habits as helpers.

I think it's entirely fair - and, more strongly stated, better for all involved, if a question is asked online which is suspect for lacking the industry etiquette, that a leading question be fired back such as "what due diligence have you done?" Or, "Not seeing your due diligence, I'll give you this: <a little advice>. If you can show me more due diligence, then I'll suggest some more." I don't see this being done a whole lot. Why not?

Some sites offer rank and prestige for answering questions regardless of any lack of etiquette or regardless of the quality of the questions. Some of this has to be seen as feeding the problem.

I think that along with systems for ranking answers - there should be a system for ranking the questions themselves - so we can let poorly-formulated questions fall to the bottom and let well-formulated questions bubble up to the top.

So ultimately the "industry etiquette CAPTCHA" is in the hands of the helper to put in place.


Bill Nicolich: www.SQLFave.com.
Daily tweet of what's new and interesting: AppendNow
Post #853635
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 7:49 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, August 19, 2014 8:47 AM
Points: 180, Visits: 683
Steve,

Great post. I learned a long time ago that there will always be someone who know more than I do. But being the competitive person that I am, I strive to learn as much as I can so that I can be considered an expert. I know I'm a long way from there, but it's the drive that keeps me going;) So many times that means asking the 'dumb' questions that everyone else is too embarrassed to ask.
Post #853663
Posted Tuesday, January 26, 2010 9:04 AM


SSC-Addicted

SSC-AddictedSSC-AddictedSSC-AddictedSSC-AddictedSSC-AddictedSSC-AddictedSSC-AddictedSSC-Addicted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, July 24, 2013 2:32 PM
Points: 454, Visits: 172
I was thrust into the world of database administration/usage/development several years ago. Someone in our office had a coupon for a free Microsoft exam for SQL Server 2005 Administration and Implementation. She offered to anyone, but I was the first to snatch it up. Prior to that, I had no interest really in databases, I was content to manage the helpdesk and do my job. But that was the problem. I was content. I had no desire to expand my knowledge beyond my spehere of influence. But for some reason, when I saw that email, I figued what the heck. I received it and 6 months later, I had passed.

Now, I can't get enough. While still not a true database admin or developer, I'm working with these things every day. I'm on SSC everyday, I've got the SQL magazine subscription and I'm trying to study for other cert tests. My biggest problem now is what area to focus on; Straight up administration or BI/Data Analysis. Both interest me a great deal, but with such vast arrays of information to suck up, it's impossible to do both I think...not to mention keep up with my current responsibilities.

So to that end, I just try to learn what I can both on the job and on my own. My IT future is uncertain for sure, but at least I know I'm gaining skills that I can apply somewhere.


The distance between genius and insanity is measured only by success.
Post #853731
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase 123»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse