Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase

Is Networking Important? Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Tuesday, September 22, 2009 4:57 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 11:24 AM
Points: 33,088, Visits: 15,197
Comments posted to this topic are about the item Is Networking Important?






Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #791663
Posted Tuesday, September 22, 2009 8:59 AM
SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, June 19, 2014 8:57 AM
Points: 1,897, Visits: 655
While I agree that networking is a vital part of staying in touch for any new position, should you happen to be looking for a new one, there are other aspects to networking.

For those of us who are comfortable in our positions and choose NOT to look for a new position, networking with your peers has other values. You may learn about a new technology that a business associate is working on that could help your company. You may learn that Company XYZ is offering discounts on hardware / software that you were not aware of. You may hear that someone is having difficulties and you could end up mentoring that individual with your experience, or point that individual to someone you know that solved that particular issue. You may learn that a competitor has lost a contract and there is a business opportunity to be followed up on. And, there is the opportunity to get out of the office and mingle, learn new stuff, and see how the rest of your peers are doing. Perhaps to even be thankful you have a secure position.
Post #791880
Posted Tuesday, September 22, 2009 9:29 AM


SSC Eights!

SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!SSC Eights!

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, July 25, 2014 8:10 AM
Points: 902, Visits: 1,705
nelsonj-902869 (9/22/2009)
While I agree that networking is a vital part of staying in touch for any new position, should you happen to be looking for a new one, there are other aspects to networking.


Thanks for sharing other values to networking.

Julie
Post #791916
Posted Tuesday, September 22, 2009 11:40 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 11:24 AM
Points: 33,088, Visits: 15,197
Nelson, excellent points. I hadn't thought about it in those terms, but there is definitely value in those situations.


One more, you might find a great person that you want to get hired at your company as well.







Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #792049
Posted Tuesday, September 22, 2009 5:47 PM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 8:22 AM
Points: 36,767, Visits: 31,223
Steve, you and Nelson are absolutely spot on. I'll add one more important reason to network and it's the diametric opposite to what most people think... it helps you find out which companies you DON'T ever want to work for and it helps find out what the worst ways to do some things are. Knowing the right way to do something certainly helps but knowing the wrong way to do something so you can quickly rule it out is a big help, as well.

For example, would you want to work for a company where you heard "Yeah... the CTO likes to buy everything off the shelf and for any in-house projects that may survive, really mandates the use of cursors because they're easy to understand."

By the way... I won't mention the company, but I DIDN'T make that up.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #792277
Posted Wednesday, September 23, 2009 6:51 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: Administrators
Last Login: Today @ 11:24 AM
Points: 33,088, Visits: 15,197
Don't know. That sounds like employment for life! Might be THE place to work.






Follow me on Twitter: @way0utwest

Forum Etiquette: How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help
Post #792576
Posted Wednesday, September 23, 2009 9:59 AM
Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, May 19, 2014 9:26 AM
Points: 312, Visits: 1,028
All of these things are true..i was someone who was hired purely on the basis of network contacts even before the position was opened up. The importance of 'knowing the grapevine' within the workplace cannot be under estimated. Equally huge are the advantages of knowing good bad and ugly place to work for. But I have some experiences with hiring ex collegues you think are good while you move or leave. It is guaranteed to screw up your relationship with ex management or ex bosses (if you think that matters). In one case i knew someone was sued - he knew how much his peers were making, moved to a new place and got them jobs at higher pay so the older company sued him for using confidential information (in this case their salaries). I really don't know what came of that but just an example. Similarly one of my other friends who ran a user group was barked at by management of two companies for spreading bad opinions on them - since she knew lot of places people would come to her for opinions and once or twice she said what she knew on email. Just stuff to watch out for.
Post #792761
Posted Wednesday, September 23, 2009 10:46 AM
SSCommitted

SSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommittedSSCommitted

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, June 19, 2014 8:57 AM
Points: 1,897, Visits: 655
Thanks for the comment, Steve.

dma said:
All of these things are true.. Similarly one of my other friends who ran a user group was barked at by management of two companies for spreading bad opinions on them - since she knew lot of places people would come to her for opinions and once or twice she said what she knew on email. Just stuff to watch out for.


My mama always told me...." that if you can't say something 'nice' about someone, don't say nothin at all......" and this applies within the networking realm. Now a days, you can get sued for "not being truthful" in your comments, but if you have proof that what you told someone is true, then let the company sue, but make sure you have documentation to back you up. No documentation - then about the only thing I would recommend is to say..."I can't comment on that..." and let it go. If pressed for details, look the person in the eyes and slowly repeat that you can't comment. If the questioner has half a brain, your eye contact should register. Better to say nothing than to leave yourself wide open to a lawsuit. What ever you do....never put a comment in an email. Bad-d-d-d-d idea, since email is forever and subject to litigation at any time.
Post #792799
Posted Wednesday, September 23, 2009 11:14 AM
Old Hand

Old HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld HandOld Hand

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, May 19, 2014 9:26 AM
Points: 312, Visits: 1,028
Very well said..and for those who are interested there is this site glassdoor.com that has anonymous reviews of companies including salaries, reviews and even interview questions.
Post #792824
Posted Wednesday, September 23, 2009 11:41 AM


SSC-Dedicated

SSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-DedicatedSSC-Dedicated

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 8:22 AM
Points: 36,767, Visits: 31,223
Steve Jones - Editor (9/23/2009)
Don't know. That sounds like employment for life! Might be THE place to work.


BWAA-HAAA!!! Hadn't thought about it THAT way! You could be right!


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #792835
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase

Permissions Expand / Collapse