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SQL Server Knockoffs? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Monday, March 16, 2009 2:55 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item SQL Server Knockoffs?






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Post #676953
Posted Monday, March 16, 2009 3:11 PM


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I think it's inevitable that software will be a commodity. On the other hand, chairs are a commodity, but Laz-y-Boy is still in business. That makes it hard to tell what the future will be on these things.

Wheels have been around since before civilization, but there are engineers who spend all their careers doing nothing but improving wheels. Again, I'm not sure the same applies to basic software, but it sure does seem to have some bearing on the subject.

There's even a market for new, improved versions of fire. After all, that's pretty much what making internal combustion engines more efficient is all about. Will there be a few million software engineers when software is as much of a commodity as fire? No. Will there be some very specialized, highly profitable companies that work at the far edge of what can be done with it? Probably.


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Post #676973
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 5:20 AM


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I don't see software as a commodity happening during my life / career. It very well may happen, but I think I'll be dead and buried for a long time beforehand.

Or perhaps the application of fire/ software will grow along the lines of basic fire, fire applied to product, and then fire as a product. I'm thinking of the evolution of fire from "Keep me warm, cook my food" to the application of Napalm... Perhaps we'll get to the point where my foes can be done in by software.



Crazy little "Web bots" running around the Net, duking it out with some foreign nemesis, then we'll need a large government body to control, regulate, and secure these creations. Perhaps something like a National Software Agency... We'll all be happy the NSA is there to protect us....




maybe there's something in those pills I'm taking.....


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Post #677336
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 5:32 AM
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No offence but thank the good lord not everyone thinks like that or we would have stopped development with DOS on a ZX spectrum and we would travel to work by horse or bicycle. After all even those who are happy with SQL 2000 could probably have settled for MSDE but when you compare DTS and SSIS or SSAS 2000 vs SSAS 2005 you cannot honestly say that all the new stuff is just add-ons to make you buy the product.
Things may plateau on features or technology for a while but sooner or later someone will come along and reinvent the wheel and we will be off and running again and that even applies to Outlook or Word.
The world cannot stand still and we need people to believe we have not "done it all".
Post #677340
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 7:24 AM


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Is this the little girl I carried?
Is this the little boy at play?
I don't remember growing older
When did they?
Sunrise, Sunset - Sunrise, Sunset...
(From "Fidler on the Roof")

Yes, everything gets to be a commodity sooner or later.
The question is, when do we become commodities?
When do those happy little machines that needed us to program them and support them become complex enough that they don't need us anymore?

Fortunately, I think I'll be in retirement when that happens.

My apologies to any who will have trouble getting that tune out of their head for the rest of the day...


___________________________________________________
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Post #677419
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 7:46 AM


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Jason Miller (3/17/2009)
I don't see software as a commodity happening during my life / career. It very well may happen, but I think I'll be dead and buried for a long time beforehand.


I imagine the inventor of fire felt the same way. But that only took, what, about 2-million years to be where it is today? :)

Or perhaps the application of fire/ software will grow along the lines of basic fire, fire applied to product, and then fire as a product. I'm thinking of the evolution of fire from "Keep me warm, cook my food" to the application of Napalm... Perhaps we'll get to the point where my foes can be done in by software.

Crazy little "Web bots" running around the Net, duking it out with some foreign nemesis, then we'll need a large government body to control, regulate, and secure these creations. Perhaps something like a National Software Agency... We'll all be happy the NSA is there to protect us....


There are already national centers in most modern countries dedicated to both attacking enemy networks and defending their own. And how far a stretch is it from Predator drones to lethal software? After all, the drones are run by software, with human guidance. (Skynet, anyone?)

maybe there's something in those pills I'm taking.....


Nah. They're just placebos. You're probably just weirder than you want to admit. :)


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Post #677439
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 8:46 AM


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GSquared (3/17/2009)

Nah. They're just placebos. You're probably just weirder than you want to admit. :)


And here I thought they were just being slipped into his food without him noticing :)







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Post #677534
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 8:47 AM
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Amen . . .there's progress galore in versions 2005 and 2008 and that progress cost hundreds of thousands of person hours to develop and test.
Post #677538
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:01 AM


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darryl.hasieber (3/17/2009)
No offence but thank the good lord not everyone thinks like that or we would have stopped development with DOS on a ZX spectrum and we would travel to work by horse or bicycle. After all even those who are happy with SQL 2000 could probably have settled for MSDE but when you compare DTS and SSIS or SSAS 2000 vs SSAS 2005 you cannot honestly say that all the new stuff is just add-ons to make you buy the product.
Things may plateau on features or technology for a while but sooner or later someone will come along and reinvent the wheel and we will be off and running again and that even applies to Outlook or Word.
The world cannot stand still and we need people to believe we have not "done it all".


I think you're missing the point. It's not that everything is done, it's not that we don't need innovation. It's that not every instance, or every situation cries out for the latest and greatest.

If I start a delivery business, I have the choice of using a new truck, or an older one with less capabilities. If I start a bar, I can get brand new guns that properly dispense mixed drinks in measured amounts, or I can get older knockoffs that run according to the user's desire.

I don't need 80% of Word's features. It's a commodity, and for most writing, it's overkill. A knockoff like ThinkOffice might work fine for most of my work.

Many of my SQL Server instances never run DTS or SSIS. They don't need anything more than SS2K provides. If someone has a knockoff, is that worth using in those cases? If they're providing support?

There are definitely places where SS2K8, and SQL 11, will make more sense. Where they'll be better choices, and they're worth taking advantage of (and paying for) to build a better application.







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Post #677559
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:19 AM
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The Express version is designed by Microsoft to fill this hole, where a solid RDBMS engine is required but not all the extra features. I guess encouraging the use of Express also provides a certain amount of vendor-lock-in too.

I completely agree with you that, especially in the non-corporate market, MSSQL 2000 fulfills all reasonable needs. But it is the lucrative enterprise market that Microsoft, Oracle, IBM et al are trying to conquer. And in this market, there seems to be no end in sight to the new products that they can think up. Just look at the current list of Microsoft Server products - it is huge!

Andy
Post #677589
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