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What's an MVP? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 10:26 AM


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As an aside, the MVPs do not all agree. We have a private newsgroup and there can be some very passionate arguments about how to do things or what the best way to do them is.

Passion is the best way to describe what needs to be done. I don't know if following the MS line plays in, but I'm not sure I do that.







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Post #531038
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 10:30 AM


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gravittl (7/9/2008)
As a DBA who manages on different platforms and databases than just SQL Server, the downside I see is that anytime I see a quote from anyone tagged as a Microsoft MVP, I almost reflexively (and probably unfairly) categorize it as "Uh-oh, someone blessed and anointed by Microsoft. I'm sure they are only parroting the party line." I guess the fear is that they can no longer be safely considered to be an independent voice.


This may be ignored as a biased comment, but I'll risk it...

The tag line for MVP is "Independent Experts, Real World Answers." There is no obligation or requirement to speak the company line and I've heard a few MVPs strongly and loudly disagreeing with things that MS has done.

If there's any bias it most likely comes from speciality. As an example, I'm highly unlikely to recommend the use of Oracle for anything. Reason is, I know almost nothing about it and cannot honestly recommend something that I don't understand.



Gail Shaw
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Post #531041
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 10:40 AM
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I'd be interested to hear comments from the MVP's on my suggestions for change posted above?

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Post #531053
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 12:11 PM


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I agree with the limits. It does seem to encourage the same people year after year, although I've seen some people dropped and new ones come on. It might encourage less competition, however, since people that were doing to be dropped might stop and new MVPs would get accepted with less effort.

There's definitely some prestige for those people that are MVPs for 6 years (or some other number). Quite a few of these people are very active in the community constantly.

Not sure I want to see more guidelines, but perhaps some comment on what things MSFT saw as most valuable over the last year.







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Post #531142
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 12:41 PM
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Not sure it would discourage competition. One part of that is no one quite knows the rules! The other part is that there is a fairly large chunk of MVP's - at least in SQL - that rarely change, so having it known that there's at least a chance I think might actually boost interest.

Would those six year plus MVP's stop participating in the community if they were out for a year? That could be good, let them recharge, or bad I guess if they only do it to retain their MVP status?

What about showing what the contributions that led to the award? Doesn't that benefit the MVP by showing the community Steve Jones wrote x editorials or answered so many questions, and where? Or that he organized a user group?


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Post #531160
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 12:43 PM


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Very intereseting ....

So if you compare one MVP(SQL - and we have some infos how to become MVP) with one Software Engineer (SQL or Oracle Database) Graduate Master or Doctorature in famous Universitys with more than 10 years experience, and he does't write for community or any speech in Microsoft events, he has just the author of many books about Database doesn't metter SQL or Oracle!

Now, who is the best for you the MVP guy or the Engineer!???

In this case if we choose the Engineer, what about the MVP!!!





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Post #531162
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 12:54 PM


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Dugi (7/9/2008)

Now, who is the best for you the MVP guy or the Engineer!???


Best for what?
Writing books?
Teaching a class?
Managing a database?



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Post #531170
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 12:58 PM


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Dugi,

I look at it this way. The MVP is a community service award. However, in order to win it you're supposed to be extremely knowledgable in the area for which you have been recognized as an MVP. While I have seen some cynicism in the developer ranks over a handful of their MVPs, in general this is not a problem in the SQL Server ranks. If I see someone is a SQL Server MVP and they're talking about something, I'm going to pull up a chair and listen. Thus far, I've not been disappointed. Since I wear dual hats, I also keep up with Directory Services and I feel this is the case with the Directory Services MVPs. They are smart, knowledgeable people who care about the community around their technology focus. As smart knowledgeable people in a particular technology focus, they are by nature solid engineers in that technology focus as well.

This isn't to say that an MVP is better than an engineer or an engineer is better than an MVP. You can't make generalizations like that. You have to look at each as individuals and how their specialties within SQL Server fit within the role you're looking to fill.


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Post #531172
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 1:53 PM


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My experience in IT over the past 12 years has been an impression that there is a distinct cultural division in IT. You clearly have a camp or tribe that views Microsoft as an advanced and technologically sophisticated company that has great software solutions. You also have a camp that views Microsoft as a cancer on the IT world that only rips off or steals ideas and then implements them in shoddy software that only sells because they already have a monopoly. Lets call these camps respectively the "Softies" and the "ABMs" (Anything But Microsoft). Both of these camps are vocal and committed and very difficult to convert or convince from the other side. Then there is a group of unknown size (because they aren't very vocal) that only cares if a tool can to the job (the "Pragmatists").

Once someone is designated a Microsoft MVP, the ABM'ers almost instantly tune that person out because they obviously had to sell out to MS to get the honor and therefore can't be trusted. The Softies will view that person as more authoritative and worthy of more attention. I have no idea how the pragmatists would view the designation. I lean toward the ABM camp but like to think that I keep an open mind and will listen to what a Softie has to say. I will even recommend their products for certain situations, especially small shops that don't have staff trained in UNIX or Linux. I definitely give more respect to a SQL Sever MVP than other categories because part of my job is managing SQL Sever dbs and the SQL Server MVPs I have read have all seemed extremely knowledgeable, professional and well grounded in relational theory. Also, I view MSSQL as one of the company's very best products. I always say that I would use SQL Server a lot more if MS put out a version for Linux :) (it's Windows that causes most of the problems). I've gotta have my UNIX shell scripts.

But I find myself wondering if a SQL Sever MVP could safely recommend that a client deploy Oracle, mySQL, Postrese, or DB2 and still be an MVP the next cycle. I have always (fairly or not I do not know) sort of suspected that MVP is an award that MS will only give out to someone who has always and will continue to promote and evangelize MS solutions. And in all fairness, I really would have the same questions about recommendations from an Oracle ACE recipient as well.

But my heartiest congratulations for your SQL Server designation. I know you have earned it through technical excellence, not for Service to Redmond. The MSSQL MVPs are in a different league in my book.
Post #531202
Posted Wednesday, July 9, 2008 1:58 PM


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CarlosHawes (7/9/2008)
But I find myself wondering if a SQL Sever MVP could safely recommend that a client deploy Oracle, mySQL, Postrese, or DB2 and still be an MVP the next cycle. I have always (fairly or not I do not know) sort of suspected that MVP is an award that MS will only give out to someone who has always and will continue to promote and evangelize MS solutions. And in all fairness, I really would have the same questions about recommendations from an Oracle ACE recipient as well.


I have seen MVPs recommend solutions other than Microsoft and maintain their MVP status.


K. Brian Kelley, CISA, MCSE, Security+, MVP - SQL Server
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