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Posted Saturday, July 5, 2014 11:27 AM
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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Cloud Skills

Andy
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Post #1589540
Posted Sunday, July 6, 2014 11:52 PM
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I think SQL Server as a Box will stay around for a long time, -even though we do Azure. OLTP Load as an example. Limitations as you mention.

As the SQL Server Version's has changed over the year's, there has been new areas to learn, -going from cocommandlinend Query Analyzer to management Studio, -get Dynamics management views. Sure there has been a lot to learn with every New Version.

For the current Version, Hyper-V, SMB 3 and Storage Spaces, In Memory solution's, "hybrid cloud", tuning on Hyper-V for SQL Server (I run around50 always on installations on Hyper-V With Virtual drives.., ehm, files:))

New Security models and .........., I always been thinking that beeing a DBA involves hardware and Storage, -understand NUMA and SPLAT, Volume alignment, lun.. And not to forget Clustering. Active Directory and certificates.

But if we look at the DBA role as you describe, sure we will loose in the long run


Post #1589733
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 12:02 AM
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I find it very hard to see how Microsoft will be adding value to someone generating thousands of virtual machines until it comes up with a way to license its software at a reasonable cost per unit.

They have figured out this puzzle before.
Post #1589734
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 1:35 AM
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I was just going to post a question in the forum about this topic exactly.
And not related to the db engine only, but even to the analytics.
I have no clear thoughts to share here, at the moment, but my feeling is that that the db engine part is moving toward a SMB market (or, better, the SMB market is going to become its main adopter), the cloud is being addressed to large distributed businesses, and the analytics are going left in favour of competitors.



Post #1589758
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 2:44 AM


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Those whose primary expertise is in SQL Server appear to have the benefits and disadvantages of working in a single system. I know that this is a simplistic view but it does mean that the knowledge required is more clearly defined than some others and also it does tie them to a single product in the short term.

I am comparing this to application development where there are different application types; services, web services, web applications, desktop applications etc. With this comes the difficulties of a far wider range of possible technologies that means that there is less tie to the success or failure of a single product but, I would argue, more technologies to employ.

In some respects this can explain the depth of knowledge that DBAs can have whereas software developers often need a breadth of knowledge. Neither job or career is easier. Just different challenges.


Gaz

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Post #1589774
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 3:27 AM


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My impression is that Microsoft does have internal divisions that fight each other for supremacy and at the moment the cloud is in the ascendancy. I think the vision within the cloud section is that they are trying to reduce the need for configuration experts. I would suggest this however will take a significant time to achieve.

That said I think there is a rise in Dev Opps and most of the members here are ideal candidates for such a role. So while in the long term the role of the DBA as it is today will alter probably getting less involved the need for intelligent mathematical individuals to connect with and use databases is only going to increase.

This is a change that is going to touch all professions not just DBAs.
Post #1589782
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 3:47 AM


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One worrisome scenario is SME's or even larger companies going to the cloud "because everyone else is". I remember a conversation back in 2000 where one client asked the web/ISP company I was working for to transform their entire website to XML, as they'd heard it was the next version of HTML.

Good article, creating lots of discussion in our DBA team this morning.

qh


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Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 3:54 AM


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quackhandle1975 (7/7/2014)
One worrisome scenario is SME's or even larger companies going to the cloud "because everyone else is". I remember a conversation back in 2000 where one client asked the web/ISP company I was working for to transform their entire website to XML, as they'd heard it was the next version of HTML.
...


Ah, but that's where our responsibility as professionals comes in to play!!!


Gaz

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Post #1589789
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 6:55 AM
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The SME thing is interesting, it certainly seems to look like that pattern of moving to the cloud is there for the SME's that work at MS.

Andy
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Post #1589834
Posted Monday, July 7, 2014 6:59 AM


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Comparing SQL Server to SQL Azure is like comparing traditional C++/C# forms to ASP.NET. There are some applications where moving to SQL Azure is an evolutionary leap, but there still be plenty of applications where sticking with SQL Server is the best choice, not only for existing implementations but also new developmet going forward.
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