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Doing What It Takes To Get The Job Done Expand / Collapse
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Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 9:01 AM


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I tend to interpret this as living up to YOUR commitments. Others have spoken about living up to OTHER's commitments. And that always sucks. I've had plenty of incompetent managers make promises that I had to keep. That's why I don't work for them any more.

Still, I try to honor my commitments to the best of my ability. Having credibility is very important. However, there are times when you have to just be honest and admit that you over-promised. You make a best guess on what it will take to get the job done. Sometimes you find out that you are not up to it.

Some of the best experiences in life happen when I have to admit that I might have bitten off more than I can chew, and have to ask for help. Living up to the majority of my commitments gets me respect. Admitting I can't do everything by myself makes me human.


Please don't go. The drones need you. They look up to you.
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Post #1561928
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 9:11 AM


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Gary Varga (4/15/2014)
Eric M Russell (4/15/2014)
I'm glad to hear that your nephew is the type who stays after hours to get the job done. He'll go far. Just think how useless a surgeon, attorney, or fire fighter would be if they didn't do the same. It doesn't matter how smart and talented someone is, if they can't or won't step up when needed and hang in there for the long haul, then they can just as well step down.


I totally agree. It also should be the same for live issues on important systems.

...just not on too regular a basis for meeting arbitrary deadlines.

Yes, although a software or database engineer can be called upon to wear the fire fighter hat on occasion, it's not our primary job. If I'm working late, then it should be because I overlooked something, I'm paying my dues in a new position, or perhaps a rare event where something in production broke and it's "all hands on deck". I'm not going to routinely sacrifice my time simply because someone else isn't planning ahead or allocating enough resources.
Post #1561933
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 9:17 AM
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Good for him. Admirable that at a fairly young age he's develop(ed)(ing) a good work ethic.


Post #1561935
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 9:25 AM


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Too often, 'getting the job done' is management code for 'we couldn't plan our way out of a paper bag'.

Yes, emergencies can and do happen, and yes, that's when it's necessary to roll up the shirtsleeves and solve the problem at hand. But there is a difference between unforeseen emergencies, and 'emergencies' which are the bastard children of poor planning and execution, finding their homes on the doorsteps of long-suffering technicians.

'Getting the job done' is often a sign the ratio between incompetent managers and competent technicians needs an adjustment.
Post #1561940
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 10:34 AM
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The biggest issue I have with "get the job done" is that it is entirely too vague. Does it mean:

1. Get the job done in the shortest time frame regardless of quality and we'll fix it later (too often the case, BTW)

2. Get the job done with the highest level of quality regardless of how long it takes

3. Get the job done so I (the manager) can get a raise / kudos / whatever and I'll take all the credit

4. Get the job done in a reasonable manner and time frame in support of corporate goals - without killing yourself; we need you and your talents going forward, too. Just let us know if and how things change that might impact the delivery.

In my view it ought to mean # 4, however GTJD is too often left to interpretation. If that's the case where you work, feel free to "steal" the above to ask clarifying questions when approached with GTJD. Just be ready for answer 2.5, which is "I'd like it done unreasonably fast and with the highest quality because I already promised the delivery date. And can you do it for free, too?"

And kudos to Andy's nephew, who felt that keeping his word was important enough to put in the extra effort. Ya gotta love someone who takes ownership of their mistakes and follows through on their commitments. Bet he learned something about estimating from it, too!




Here there be dragons...,

Steph Brown
Post #1561970
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 11:02 AM


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Unfortunately, for me GTJD has come to mean "work yourself to death to meet that deadline". I have worked at a couple of companies where this phrase has taken a negative connotation because it seems to pop up when there is an extremely aggressive deadline. I agree with Stephanie's list that it should mean item 4. However, it seems that due to poor estimates and even poorer communication across groups, it keeps meaning "work until it is done with some reasonable quality, not until it is perfect and something that you are proud of". Basically, get it out the door by the deadline regardless of what else is on your plate and cross your fingers that it works as expected...
Post #1561984
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 11:03 AM


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I've introduced more manager to the following:

You always have choice:
1. Cheap
2. Fast
3. Good
Pick any two.

I had a fifteen minute conversation with my last manager about that. She couldn't break the logic anymore than anyone else I've explained it too. But once a manager gets it down over scheduling seems to go down.




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Post #1561987
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 11:07 AM


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Jim P. (4/15/2014)
I've introduced more manager to the following:

You always have choice:
1. Cheap
2. Fast
3. Good
Pick any two.

I had a fifteen minute conversation with my last manager about that. She couldn't break the logic anymore than anyone else I've explained it too. But once a manager gets it down over scheduling seems to go down.


We had a triangle on a whiteboard with this same explanation and would point to it at meetings when we were asked to do it cheap fast and with 100% quality (that in itself is usually problematic). You pull one end of the triangle down and it pushes another end out.
Post #1561990
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2014 4:55 PM


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Jim P. (4/15/2014)
I've introduced more manager to the following:

You always have choice:
1. Cheap
2. Fast
3. Good
Pick any two.

I had a fifteen minute conversation with my last manager about that. She couldn't break the logic anymore than anyone else I've explained it too. But once a manager gets it down over scheduling seems to go down.


Tom Thompson wrote about that old saying and justified how one of the two should always be #3 (good) and then there's a very strong possibility that the other two will actually follow. I strongly agree with Tom's sentiment on that subject.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

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Post #1562085
Posted Wednesday, April 16, 2014 1:55 AM


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Jeff Moden (4/15/2014)
Jim P. (4/15/2014)
I've introduced more manager to the following:

You always have choice:
1. Cheap
2. Fast
3. Good
Pick any two.

I had a fifteen minute conversation with my last manager about that. She couldn't break the logic anymore than anyone else I've explained it too. But once a manager gets it down over scheduling seems to go down.


Tom Thompson wrote about that old saying and justified how one of the two should always be #3 (good) and then there's a very strong possibility that the other two will actually follow. I strongly agree with Tom's sentiment on that subject.


Especially if cost is defined in the longer term!!!


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
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