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Step Up, Don’t Step Back Expand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, January 15, 2014 9:06 PM


Grasshopper

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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Step Up, Don’t Step Back


Post #1531380
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 3:33 AM
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This is a great point Chris, I have heard it quoted that 10% of your learning comes from direct study, 20% comes from mentoring and co-workers but 70% comes from working on projects, firefighting issues, developing new solutions etc. My experience would bear that out. There's is nothing like being stretched beyond your comfort zone to give you confidence afterwards. I cycle in my spare time and we planned a long tour with 90 mile days. At that point my max was 65 miles/day and I was a little nervous about my ability. I set my mind on a big day in preparation and did a 110 mile day and I knew I had more in me when I got home. It was completely liberating. From that day on I have laughed in the face of 90 miles, it holds no fear for me :) It's exactly the same principle. The excitement in life is looking for your limits and still not being able to find them. It encourages you to keep doing more.
Very good article,
Thanks!
Mart
Post #1531476
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 4:17 AM


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Also, step forward and you will find others will step forward with you who wouldn't have done so alone.

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1531486
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 6:55 AM
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I agree with this advice. No regrets, though? I think everyone has regrets. But, like Frank, too few to mention. There are definite positives to stepping up but there are negatives. One negative is taking on too much and working yourself to death (not literal death, I hope). Another is finding you have no affinity for the tasks and embarass yourself. Overall, though, there are more positives than negatives.

This can apply to your personal life, too. Last year I volunteered to mentor a child in technology and was worried about how I would do. It's turned out wonderfully.

Tom
Post #1531543
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 6:58 AM
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I was in the military too before becoming a DBA and I too volunteered for extra things and never regretted it.
The ones that don't try anything new never get to see the top of the mountain and view far off vistas.
Post #1531547
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 6:58 AM


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Thanks for your note.

I am often asked about the Marine Corps training. There are many aspects to the training, and I remember being told about how they want to break you down. I use to think and it may be true, that they break you down because they want everyone to be able to respond to orders without questioning. I think it goes deeper. Just like what you said and found, you don't know how hard you can push until you have been pushed to what you feel is all you got, that you have nothing left and can't do a single thing more. When you reach that point. Just take one more little baby step, and then it is easy to see all the walls have always been in your mind.

Chris



Post #1531549
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 6:59 AM


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I could not agree more.


Post #1531550
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 7:10 AM


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Not military related but I was working on a project as a C++ developer. We were creating a web application using ASP calling COM objects developed in C++. Towards the end of the project the C++ work was drying up but there were many issues with the front end. The project manager asked two of us (both freelancers) if we were prepared to assist with the ASP. I said yes as long as they accepted that I had only read a number of articles and books on the technology and had no practical experience. The other chap said no, stating that he was a C++ developer.

My next contract was as an ASP web developer.
The other chap was without work for over 18 months.

The other chap is a nice bloke and I had seen how good and committed he was. Having said that, wrong choice by him.


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1531556
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 7:14 AM


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Tom,

Thanks for your note.

Are there things I wished I would have done differently? Sure, but big picture wise my mistakes or things I wished I would have done differently, either appeared as the correct decision at that time or I was just plain stupid (Like skipping school to go party with the buds). Those poor decisions, taught me just as much if not more then the decisions that were positive.

Thanks again for taking time to post.



Post #1531559
Posted Thursday, January 16, 2014 6:06 PM
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I have to agree with the other posts on this subject. I've learned tremendous things about my profession, tools, languages, and myself by volunteering.

Right now I'm two years into learning to handle a Zoom-Boom (like a fork lift but the forks are on an extendable arm) to move 3,500 to 6,000 pound blocks of ice around. Talk about stretching into different arena's! I do this for a non-profit organization that hosts a yearly ice sculpting event in North Pole, Alaska (see www.christmasinice.org for more info if you're curious).

I've never regretted stepping out of my comfort zone. Even if things don't turn out the way I hoped or planned, I still learn something valuable. And for me, that what really counts.



Here there be dragons...,

Steph Brown
Post #1531887
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