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Looking to 2014 Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, January 2, 2014 8:51 AM
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Markus (1/2/2014)
djackson 22568 (1/2/2014)
Markus (1/2/2014)
It will be interesting to see what the XP marketshare is once Microsoft fully desupports it in 2014. Then, if a flaw is found how bad will it be exploited since Microsoft will not patch it.... Right now XP marketshare is still over 25%. We still have some XP PCs here.. not many but a few to support apps that do not support Win7.


Back around November 2012 MS announced that Windows 8 was outselling Windows 7 by huge amounts. Around the end of December they admitted they lied. W8 was doing WORSE than Vista.

I mention that because I do not believe for one second that XP has only 25% of the Windows desktop market. I believe it is far higher than 50% in business, although on personal computers that may not be the case. Most companies buy PCs and then downgrade to XP due to an awful lot of software not running on Windows 7 yet.

I may very well be wrong on my estimates, but I stand by my point that I do not trust MS any longer when it comes to claims about market share.

As an example from healthcare, very few of the products sold to us will run on Windows 7. Most require IE 7 or 8 at the best. Healthcare software vendors are spending money chasing moving regulations from the feds, and do not have time nor resources to spend updating software for Windows 7. A lot are pushing to do that now that XP is losing support - but they are behind. The same goes for SQL, most of my products supported SQL 2000 only when SQL 2008 was released. About 2009 or 2010 they started supporting SQL 2005. This is only one industry, but a lot of people I talk to are still running very old software that won't run under Windows 7.


We budgeted a significant amount to replace half of our PCs last year, or to upgrade to W7. Due to various issues we still have well over 75% of our PCs on Windows XP SP3 or earlier! Not all of this is due to vendor issues - some is poor project management.

I don't think we are unique, nor do I think your situation is unique. The question is where most companies fall. The economy, software support, and a lot of other issues make this a difficult transition.

Oh I don't know.... I'd say the percentages are probably on target. From the IT folks I check with most companies are just about rid of XP now with a few still on legacy systems like two systems here. We have a handful still on XP for that reason. Other than that all Win7. I see us sticking with Win7 for a long time like we did with XP.


Dave
Post #1527165
Posted Thursday, January 2, 2014 8:54 AM


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Oh I agree... I agree.... Your results may vary... no doubt...

I just because the folks at companies I know are just about off of or totally off of XP doesn't mean that is the case everywhere...



Post #1527170
Posted Friday, January 3, 2014 2:58 AM
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"In the rest of the data world,..."
I think the data world outside of the physical database is starting to mature, driven by governance which will be driven regulatory oversight. In many companies this is likely to push down through architecture and will put severe pressure on the DBA function - who after all is seen as the the dude who 'knows' what's going on in the databases and is the technology common end point.

ACID may no longer be enough when you have to prove wider data quality, provenance and ownership to mention a few things. Impenetrable SSIS jobs might be a big problem for trace-ability.

The evolving issues will include getting dragged into "how did we/how do we" conversations around "hey, how have we ended up with customer data spread across all these databases ?"

So all those issues about projects/designers/developers doing their own thing 'because it's quicker/easier/cheaper' will start coming home to roost.

Standards: "Eh, what do you mean we have 30 glossaries, no common definitions, data dictionaries or data models?"


Post #1527410
Posted Friday, January 3, 2014 5:11 AM


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g.brennan (1/3/2014)
"In the rest of the data world,..."
I think the data world outside of the physical database is starting to mature, driven by governance which will be driven regulatory oversight. In many companies this is likely to push down through architecture and will put severe pressure on the DBA function - who after all is seen as the the dude who 'knows' what's going on in the databases and is the technology common end point.

ACID may no longer be enough when you have to prove wider data quality, provenance and ownership to mention a few things. Impenetrable SSIS jobs might be a big problem for trace-ability.

The evolving issues will include getting dragged into "how did we/how do we" conversations around "hey, how have we ended up with customer data spread across all these databases ?"

So all those issues about projects/designers/developers doing their own thing 'because it's quicker/easier/cheaper' will start coming home to roost.

Standards: "Eh, what do you mean we have 30 glossaries, no common definitions, data dictionaries or data models?"


Ah!!! One of my (many) pet hates...the appplication of no process under the guise of agile!!!


Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1527459
Posted Friday, January 3, 2014 9:45 AM
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Hi Steve,

Like you I see the two major items you mentioned as the big ones. With the need for bigger better faster driving our online transaction lives it should be the main focus. This will not complete the migration away from spinning disk technology but will be an operational step that has sat on the conceptual lab server for too long. We have been making inroads to these technologies and it is time they became real for the masses.

But more along the line of NoSql and the world of data. I have been looking into the use of Predictive Coding as part of eDiscovery over the past month and how it is in the process of restructuring both the Federal Rules of Civil Proceedings and the case law concerning Discovery. With a better understanding now where this could all go, there is a tremendous potential no only in the legal realm but also in the general "need to know" for those experts who mine data. Using the computer automated searching algorithms and the artificial intelligence that appears to be inside the truly integrated toolsets available or being developed, this emerging technology could restructure how we think and deal with data and specifically Big Data.

With this in mind I am in complete agreement about NoSQL and other data products. Further I hope that Microsoft will some how address this area by developing some new interface or options to include SQL Server and SharePoint data collections in the discussion of eDiscovery using a combination of Microsoft and non-Microsoft products. Lastly, knowing Microsoft's history of cloning their products that were never intended to do something into a "new" product that is great and free, I hope that if Microsoft enters the field of Predictive Coding that they either write one from scratch, or buy an existing product and incorporate it into the MS family.

Thanks

M.


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Post #1527627
Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 10:05 AM
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One area of movement will be the accelerated movement to SSDs. They are dropping in cost rapidly and I think we'll start seeing them in more and more systems from SANs to consumer laptops. I also think that on line learning will continue to change the face of education. It's becoming easy to take and get credit for on line classes now. Just check out Coursera for tons of examples.

Finally I think this will be a watershed year for the Cloud/Security. I think there will be some pull back from the cloud hype as business/people find out their data was copied/stolen from them without them ever knowing. Some cloud provider employee will leak that someone copied x number of systems from <provider>. The <provider> will have kept it secret. BIG FALLOUT ala Target. (This is my John Dvorak prediction). :)

J
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Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 10:41 AM
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John Hanrahan (1/6/2014)
One area of movement will be the accelerated movement to SSDs. They are dropping in cost rapidly and I think we'll start seeing them in more and more systems from SANs to consumer laptops. I also think that on line learning will continue to change the face of education. It's becoming easy to take and get credit for on line classes now. Just check out Coursera for tons of examples.

Finally I think this will be a watershed year for the Cloud/Security. I think there will be some pull back from the cloud hype as business/people find out their data was copied/stolen from them without them ever knowing. Some cloud provider employee will leak that someone copied x number of systems from <provider>. The <provider> will have kept it secret. BIG FALLOUT ala Target. (This is my John Dvorak prediction). :)

J

On SSDs, everyone needs to keep in mind that there are severe limits on how long SSDs can be written to. With RAID, you can accomodate the risks, but you need to be aware of them.

As far as security goes, I doubt any real progress will be made. SANS had an article about how senators are pushing to go to embedded chips in CCs, now that the Target breach has come up. Really? How is using a chip going to prevent someone from HACKING INTO THEIR DATABASE!!! We really elect these people?


Dave
Post #1528184
Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 10:56 AM


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John Hanrahan (1/6/2014)

Finally I think this will be a watershed year for the Cloud/Security.

J


I hope so







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Post #1528188
Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 10:57 AM


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djackson 22568 (1/6/2014)

...
We really elect these people?


It's not even elected people, but people in our own business. I have a demo showing how SQL Injection bypasses encryption in my talk. It's amazing how many technical people don't get the severe issues we have with SQL Injection.







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Post #1528189
Posted Monday, January 6, 2014 11:00 AM


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One area of movement will be the accelerated movement to SSDs. They are dropping in cost rapidly and I think we'll start seeing them in more and more systems from SANs to consumer laptops. I also think that on line learning will continue to change the face of education.

We just took delivery of a new SAN 3rd quarter last year. In about a month we are going to be adding a ton more of SSD to it.



Post #1528193
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