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Posted Monday, June 17, 2013 3:23 PM
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Trade associations and industry standards tend to function most effectively as tools to limit competition and as barriers to entry, rather than as tools to create and enforce professional standards.

Medical boards, bar associations, and professional unions are notorious for protecting even the most incompetent or outright criminal members. Stories of incompetent doctors still practicing after killing multiple patients, police who are still on the job after unjustified violent assaults or killings, and attorneys who have cost the freedom of innocent people with no consequences are so common that there is little outrage.

I doubt that IT needs a similar system to protect incompetent developers and DBAs.



Post #1464406
Posted Tuesday, June 18, 2013 2:23 AM


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All fair points. Maybe I am being a little naive and idealistic.

Gaz

-- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!
Post #1464500
Posted Tuesday, June 18, 2013 8:00 AM
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Gary Varga (6/18/2013)
All fair points. Maybe I am being a little naive and idealistic.


Some idealism is a good thing as long as it's mixed with some skepticism.

Too much skepticism leads to bitterness and an unwillingness to try anything new.

Too much idealism leads to unrealistic expections.

Fortunately, I don't think you've hit either extreme.
Post #1464672
Posted Thursday, June 20, 2013 8:49 AM


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As technology industries move further and further into areas where lives can be lost (as in pharmaceuticals and construction), I think we will see that things have to mature or else major problems will ensue. The same thing happened with the Triangle Shirtwaist Company fire, which triggered a demand for increased safety rules.

Sadly, though, it seems that because the current state seems to involve a combination of money or privacy losses, which while terrible don't rise to the level of mortality in most cases, the same pressure hasn't been brought to bear. On top of that, though, is that the tech knowledge is akin to priestly incantations for the vast majority of people and is largely invisible to the naked eye, so I bet there are a lot of disagreements about what real tech maturity might look like.

But I hope we won't wait for the equivalent of a horrible, deadly fire before agreeing on standards that can increase the industries' maturity. I guess it comes down to whether computerization is truly a unique industry/business entity or can be put in line with other industries such as mechanical engineering, medicine (which of course still has issues), auto manufacturing, etc.


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Post #1465747
Posted Thursday, June 20, 2013 12:10 PM
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webrunner (6/20/2013)
... I guess it comes down to whether computerization is truly a unique industry/business entity or can be put in line with other industries such as mechanical engineering, medicine (which of course still has issues), auto manufacturing, etc.


In some cases, the standards for computerization might be dependent upon the industry.

There are some standards which would make sense for medical records that wouldn't at all make sense for AutoCad; some that would make sense for financial accounting that wouldn't make sense for games.

So, a one-size-fits-all standard for IT might not make sense; but standards for IT by industry would.
Post #1465881
Posted Thursday, June 20, 2013 12:14 PM


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marcia.j.wilson (6/20/2013)
webrunner (6/20/2013)
... I guess it comes down to whether computerization is truly a unique industry/business entity or can be put in line with other industries such as mechanical engineering, medicine (which of course still has issues), auto manufacturing, etc.


In some cases, the standards for computerization might be dependent upon the industry.

There are some standards which would make sense for medical records that wouldn't at all make sense for AutoCad; some that would make sense for financial accounting that wouldn't make sense for games.

So, a one-size-fits-all standard for IT might not make sense; but standards for IT by industry would.


Yes, that's a great point and would make a lot of sense.

- webrunner


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Post #1465883
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