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Upgrading to 2012 Expand / Collapse
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Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 7:52 AM
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Friday Greetings!

The "Always On" high-availibilty cluster is reason enough for us to upgrade our production environment. Doing away with an older marathon solution and offloading our SSRS reports to the secondary server using "ApplicationIntent=ReadOnly"...

In testing as we speak and scheduled to go-live at the end of the month!
Post #1444412
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 7:56 AM
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We are looking to upgrade, but that's because we're still at SQL 2005. However, I'm interested in how this discussion goes, so will watch people's answers.

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Rod
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Post #1444415
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 9:01 AM
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We are running SQL Server 2008 R2 and I am putting my case together to move to SQL Servre 2012 in from of management. We are 24*7 SaaS company and using Mirroring+ Log shipping for HADR. I Alwasys On feature will help us a lot in case of any disaster.
Post #1444471
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 9:30 AM


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SQL Server 2012 has introduced some significant changes in services and features like availability options, Semantic Search, FileTables, ColumnStore indexes, to name a few. For a DBA or BI developer, it's a leap forward.

From a T-SQL developer's perspective, the ability to THROW and error from a CATCH block is nice to have, and I'm liking the CONCAT and CHOOSE functions, but 2012 is less of a game changer than 2005 or even 2008. It also depends on whether you're leveraging spacial or file related types in your data model.
Post #1444484
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 9:53 AM


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I have been using SQL Server 2012 in production since SP1 was released. We are a small organization, however, and it is easier to make changes. My main motivation for upgrading (SQL Server 2008 R2 SE -> SQL Server 2012 EE) was to take advantage of Master Data Services, and that has worked out very well (though I went through a bit of hell getting it to work prior to SP1).

I am currently evaluating the BI features of SharePoint 2013, also running against SQL Server 2012. It was surprisingly easy to set up, relatively speaking. We may also decide to take advantage of AlwaysOn at some point.

Several production databases are still running on the old SQL Server 2008 R2 server, but only because we haven't taken the time to move them yet. AlwaysOn may provide incentive for doing that.

(Edit: old servers are SQL Server 2008 R2, not 2008 RTM.)
Post #1444494
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 9:54 AM


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My company is looking at upgrading to 2012 because we are primarily 2005 now and management wants to get current. It is difficult to say that any new features are driving this.
Post #1444495
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 10:00 AM


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We are mainly running 2008 in differing flavours. I have not seen any business reasons that have made me consider the additional cost of the new licensing model for the applications that we serve, although from a technical standpoint there are significant gains with 2012.

All new development is still being based upon 2008 R2 and will be for some time. The extended support lasts to July 2019 and unless there is a feature that is specifically required we will not be looking to upgrade anytime soon.



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Post #1444497
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 10:40 AM


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shaycullen (4/19/2013)
Friday Greetings!

The "Always On" high-availibilty cluster is reason enough for us to upgrade our production environment.


Shay,

I agree, this IMHO is the number one reason to upgrade. ColumnStore indexes, on the other hand, are used primarily for data warehousing large set query performance and while it does enhance perfromance in that area in some cases, in other cases it actually degrades performance from what I am hearing and reading.. But, with that being said, that it is still not a compelling enough reason to upgrade to SQL Server 2012 , particularly with so many shops still not even using data warehousing yet.


"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ..."
Post #1444513
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 10:57 AM


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It has taken us almost 4 years to get all but 8 production databases off of SQL2000 to 2008R2. Yes, we still have 8 on SQL2000! We have also been upgrading some SQL2005 to 2008 as well. With about 325 production databases I know of very few that are purchased apps that have certified SQL2012. Heck, in January we just installed a new system that we FORCED the vendor to certify Win2008R2/SQL2008R2. They are still running Win2003/SQL2005 in their hosted site and have over 20,000 prod dbs.

We haven't even looked at Win2012 or SQL2012. We are too busy with current and coming projects right now.



Post #1444521
Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 11:03 AM
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The organization where I now work has experienced substantial pain in the past by not upgrading SQL Server versions. For this reason, it has long been the policy here that we will continuously manage and move up the upgrade path.

I want to echo what several commenters have already said about the length of time it takes to upgrade a production environment. Even though we have a policy which states that we will constantly upgrade, we just succeeded in upgrading our main production instance two weeks ago, almost a year after 2012 was released. Further, we still have many production instances left to upgrade. Some of these will not be upgraded for at least another two years, due to the fact that they support 3rd party applications which themselves do not support 2012.

Given these examples, I believe that a sharp focus on licensing costs is a mistake. Delays in upgrading will lead to deteriorating systems. The longer the upgrade is put off, the more that it will cost in terms of time and effort to eventually upgrade. Systems in such a state are often simply decommissioned.
Post #1444523
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