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Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 5:29 PM
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There is a table similar to the one below:

create table #Orders
(
OrdNum varchar(5)
, Empid int
, Mgrid int
, MgrLevel int
)

insert #Orders
values ('XZ1', 100, 100, 1)
, ('XZ1', 100, 351, 2)
, ('XZ1', 100, 355, 3)

, ('XZ1', 200, 200, 1)
, ('XZ1', 200, 451, 2)
, ('XZ1', 200, 555, 3)

, ('SY1', 200, 200, 1)
, ('SY1', 200, 451, 2)
, ('SY1', 200, 555, 3)

I need a query that takes order number and empid as parameters and returns all the employees involved in an order, so for example, for order XZ1 and employee 555, result should be 200, 451, and 555.

Thanks in advance for your help.
Post #1352537
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 6:52 PM


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This is probably too simple, but maybe a start for you:

SELECT a.*
FROM #Orders a
INNER JOIN (
SELECT OrdNum, EmpID
FROM #Orders
WHERE OrdNum = 'XZ1' AND Mgrid = 555
) b
ON a.OrdNum = b.OrdNum and a.EmpID = b.EmpID





My mantra: No loops! No CURSORs! No RBAR! Hoo-uh!

My thought question: Have you ever been told that your query runs too fast?

My advice:
INDEXing a poor-performing query is like putting sugar on cat food. Yeah, it probably tastes better but are you sure you want to eat it?
The path of least resistance can be a slippery slope. Take care that fixing your fixes of fixes doesn't snowball and end up costing you more than fixing the root cause would have in the first place.


Need to UNPIVOT? Why not CROSS APPLY VALUES instead?
Since random numbers are too important to be left to chance, let's generate some!
Learn to understand recursive CTEs by example.
Splitting strings based on patterns can be fast!
My temporal SQL musings: Calendar Tables, an Easter SQL, Time Slots and Self-maintaining, Contiguous Effective Dates in Temporal Tables
Post #1352546
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 7:37 PM


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Please see the following. It's pretty simple to do once you know how...
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/72503/


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1352552
Posted Thursday, August 30, 2012 9:23 PM


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Jeff Moden (8/30/2012)
Please see the following. It's pretty simple to do once you know how...
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/72503/


I was initially expecting to have to use the standard rCTE adjacency list traversal, but then it seemed the OPs requirements were a bit simpler. That why I said it looked "too easy."



My mantra: No loops! No CURSORs! No RBAR! Hoo-uh!

My thought question: Have you ever been told that your query runs too fast?

My advice:
INDEXing a poor-performing query is like putting sugar on cat food. Yeah, it probably tastes better but are you sure you want to eat it?
The path of least resistance can be a slippery slope. Take care that fixing your fixes of fixes doesn't snowball and end up costing you more than fixing the root cause would have in the first place.


Need to UNPIVOT? Why not CROSS APPLY VALUES instead?
Since random numbers are too important to be left to chance, let's generate some!
Learn to understand recursive CTEs by example.
Splitting strings based on patterns can be fast!
My temporal SQL musings: Calendar Tables, an Easter SQL, Time Slots and Self-maintaining, Contiguous Effective Dates in Temporal Tables
Post #1352567
Posted Friday, August 31, 2012 7:52 AM


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Group: General Forum Members
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dwain.c (8/30/2012)
Jeff Moden (8/30/2012)
Please see the following. It's pretty simple to do once you know how...
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/72503/


I was initially expecting to have to use the standard rCTE adjacency list traversal, but then it seemed the OPs requirements were a bit simpler. That why I said it looked "too easy."


Understood and, to be sure, I wasn't knocking you. I was just offering an alternative.


--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1352819
Posted Friday, August 31, 2012 11:09 AM
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Thank you all for the feedback. I ended up using dwain.c's query. Other articles you provided are very clear too. There are a few problems i can easily solve using these. Thanks again.
Post #1352991
Posted Friday, August 31, 2012 11:13 AM


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You bet... thank you for the feedback.

--Jeff Moden
"RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

(play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Post #1352996
Posted Saturday, September 1, 2012 5:28 AM


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Jeff Moden (8/31/2012)
dwain.c (8/30/2012)
Jeff Moden (8/30/2012)
Please see the following. It's pretty simple to do once you know how...
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/72503/


I was initially expecting to have to use the standard rCTE adjacency list traversal, but then it seemed the OPs requirements were a bit simpler. That why I said it looked "too easy."


Understood and, to be sure, I wasn't knocking you. I was just offering an alternative.


I didn't think so.

And to OP: You're welcome, glad it works for you.



My mantra: No loops! No CURSORs! No RBAR! Hoo-uh!

My thought question: Have you ever been told that your query runs too fast?

My advice:
INDEXing a poor-performing query is like putting sugar on cat food. Yeah, it probably tastes better but are you sure you want to eat it?
The path of least resistance can be a slippery slope. Take care that fixing your fixes of fixes doesn't snowball and end up costing you more than fixing the root cause would have in the first place.


Need to UNPIVOT? Why not CROSS APPLY VALUES instead?
Since random numbers are too important to be left to chance, let's generate some!
Learn to understand recursive CTEs by example.
Splitting strings based on patterns can be fast!
My temporal SQL musings: Calendar Tables, an Easter SQL, Time Slots and Self-maintaining, Contiguous Effective Dates in Temporal Tables
Post #1353139
Posted Sunday, September 2, 2012 4:42 AM
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Good article Jeff Moden Helped me !!!!
Post #1353195
Posted Sunday, September 2, 2012 4:56 AM
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Can be solved using DECLARE and derived column

DECLARE @OrdNum varchar(5)
DECLARE @Empid int
SET @OrdNum='XZ1'
SET @Empid=200
SELECT * FROM (SELECT OrdNum,Empid,Mgrid,MgrLevel FROM #Orders
WHERE OrdNum=@OrdNum AND Empid=@Empid
) AS A
Post #1353197
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