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Barcode 128 generator (using scalar function) Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, February 17, 2011 4:47 AM
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I'm looking for a barcode generating Function that uses the standard Code128. Apparently no function that fixes this has been posted before in the forum.

The way the barcode functions work is always the same: you pass a string with the source code ('bananas') and you get the coded barcode string ( ÑbananasÈÓ, always starts with capital Ñ and ends with Ó).

I have the right function in Access VBA (code attached), but I'm not able to translate this into SQL Server.

Does anyone have the equivalent SQL Server function (or knows how to translate this) ?

Thanks in advance, a.


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basCode128.txt (91 views, 3.77 KB)
Post #1065554
Posted Monday, April 8, 2013 4:20 AM
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The way the barcode functions work is always the same: you pass a string with the source code ('bananas') and you get the coded barcode string ( ÑbananasÈÓ, always starts with capital Ñ and ends with Ó).

I expect one or more of the functions/tools people have suggested will do the business.

But I wanted to point out that Code 128 is not quite like that. Unlike eg Code 39, it is not a straight character-for-character substitution, so just applying a font with static bracketing values doesn't work. It needs a calculated checksum (which is not shown in the human-readable version nor transmitted to the receiving system, but ensures the quality of the data read by the scanner), which is why you need to apply a function to the data you want to encode. And I do not think the control characters are universal - I have seen different font sets that have made different choices with regard to the extended characters they use to represent the control values. Presumably the ones you specify will work for your environment.
Post #1439735
Posted Thursday, June 26, 2014 2:23 AM
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It depends on what it does. There are literally hundreds of barcode formats, even inside the 128 format there are are multiples ways of calculating the output of a given entry.

The VBA code attached to my 1st message works and it's not that difficult to translate to other languages.
Post #1586285
Posted Thursday, June 26, 2014 2:27 AM


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a_ud (6/26/2014)
It depends on what it does. There are literally hundreds of barcode formats, even inside the 128 format there are are multiples ways of calculating the output of a given entry.

The VBA code attached to my 1st message works and it's not that difficult to translate to other languages.


Don't bother - that post you replied to is spam.


MM


select geometry::STGeomFromWKB(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  • Post #1586286
    Posted Wednesday, February 4, 2015 7:46 PM
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    One my web application uses barcodes.... When i add a new item i am generating a barcode value which is converted to a barcode image... My question is what would you suggest storing barcode values or barcode images in sql server 2005?What Type of barcode you would suggest using with an asp.net application?Linear Barcode (Code 128) is my choice.. Any other suggestion....
    Post #1657741
    Posted Wednesday, February 4, 2015 9:40 PM


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    a_ud (6/26/2014)
    The VBA code attached to my 1st message works and it's not that difficult to translate to other languages.


    If that were true, you wouldn't be asking for help, now would you?

    This is actually pretty easy to pull off in SQL Server including the CheckSum character but I need you to answer a question first. According to the start character that you've used, it implies that you will always be using Barcode 128 "B". Is that true or will you make excursions to Barcode 128 "A" and/or Barcode 128 "C"?


    --Jeff Moden
    "RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

    (play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

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    Post #1657765
    Posted Wednesday, February 4, 2015 9:46 PM


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    Ewan Hampson (4/8/2013)
    The way the barcode functions work is always the same: you pass a string with the source code ('bananas') and you get the coded barcode string ( ÑbananasÈÓ, always starts with capital Ñ and ends with Ó).

    I expect one or more of the functions/tools people have suggested will do the business.

    But I wanted to point out that Code 128 is not quite like that. Unlike eg Code 39, it is not a straight character-for-character substitution, so just applying a font with static bracketing values doesn't work. It needs a calculated checksum (which is not shown in the human-readable version nor transmitted to the receiving system, but ensures the quality of the data read by the scanner), which is why you need to apply a function to the data you want to encode. And I do not think the control characters are universal - I have seen different font sets that have made different choices with regard to the extended characters they use to represent the control values. Presumably the ones you specify will work for your environment.


    But, once you've calculated the CheckSum character, it is just as easy as applying the font on a 1:1 basis. Attaining the proper 128-B True Type font isn't all that difficult and neither is calculating the ChecksSum character in T-SQL. I'm working on that for BarCode 128-B right now.


    --Jeff Moden
    "RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

    (play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to post performance problems
    Post #1657768
    Posted Wednesday, February 4, 2015 11:44 PM


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    a_ud (2/17/2011)
    I'm looking for a barcode generating Function that uses the standard Code128. Apparently no function that fixes this has been posted before in the forum.

    The way the barcode functions work is always the same: you pass a string with the source code ('bananas') and you get the coded barcode string ( ÑbananasÈÓ, always starts with capital Ñ and ends with Ó).

    I have the right function in Access VBA (code attached), but I'm not able to translate this into SQL Server.

    Does anyone have the equivalent SQL Server function (or knows how to translate this) ?

    Thanks in advance, a.


    Here you go. Details are in the code as they should be. Please do read the comments because this function won't handle excursions to Type A or C, yet. Example usage included in the comments.
     CREATE FUNCTION dbo.BarCode128
    /**********************************************************************************************************************
    Pupose:
    Given a string of legal "Type B" Barcode 128 characters, return the original string with StartCode, Checksum, and
    StopCode characters.

    Note that this will currently only handle "Type B" and no excursions to "Type A" or "Type C" are allowed. The
    @pBarCodeStart is for future exapansion to handle such things.

    Usage:
    SELECT BarCode128
    FROM dbo.BarCode128('B','bananas') --ÑbananasÈÓ expected
    ;

    References:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_128
    http://courses.cs.washington.edu/courses/cse370/01au/minirproject/BarcodeBattlers/barcodes.html

    Revision History:
    Rev 00 - 05 Feb 2015 - Jeff Moden
    - Intial creation. Handles only legal "Type B" characters and no excursions to "Type A" or "Type C".
    **********************************************************************************************************************/
    (
    @pBarCodeStart CHAR(1)
    ,@pString VARCHAR(8000)
    )
    RETURNS TABLE AS --iSF or "Inline Scalar Function", in this case.
    RETURN WITH
    cteCheckSum AS
    (
    SELECT CheckSumValue = (
    ASCII(@pBarCodeStart)+38 --StartCode Value (38 is 103-65 and 65 is "A")
    +SUM((ASCII(SUBSTRING(@pString,t.N,1))-32)*t.N)
    )%103+32
    FROM dbo.fnTally(1,LEN(@pString)) t
    )
    SELECT BarCode128 =
    CHAR(ASCII(@pBarCodeStart)+143) --StartCode Character (143 is 200-65 and 65 is "A")
    + @pString --Original String
    + CHAR(CheckSumValue + CASE WHEN CheckSumValue < 127 THEN 0 ELSE 73 END) --CheckSum Character
    + CHAR(211) --StopCode Character
    FROM cteCheckSum
    WHERE @pBarCodeStart = 'B'
    ;

    Here's the code for the dbo.fnTally function. If you don't know what it is or how it works, see the "references" in the comments in the code.
     CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fnTally]
    /**********************************************************************************************************************
    Purpose:
    Return a column of BIGINTs from @ZeroOrOne up to and including @MaxN with a max value of 1 Billion.

    As a performance note, it takes about 00:02:10 (hh:mm:ss) to generate 1 Billion numbers to a throw-away variable.

    Usage:
    --===== Syntax example (Returns BIGINT)
    SELECT t.N
    FROM dbo.fnTally(@ZeroOrOne,@MaxN) t
    ;

    Notes:
    1. Based on Itzik Ben-Gan's cascading CTE (cCTE) method for creating a "readless" Tally Table source of BIGINTs.
    Refer to the following URLs for how it works and introduction for how it replaces certain loops.
    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/62867/
    http://sqlmag.com/sql-server/virtual-auxiliary-table-numbers
    2. To start a sequence at 0, @ZeroOrOne must be 0 or NULL. Any other value that's convertable to the BIT data-type
    will cause the sequence to start at 1.
    3. If @ZeroOrOne = 1 and @MaxN = 0, no rows will be returned.
    5. If @MaxN is negative or NULL, a "TOP" error will be returned.
    6. @MaxN must be a positive number from >= the value of @ZeroOrOne up to and including 1 Billion. If a larger
    number is used, the function will silently truncate after 1 Billion. If you actually need a sequence with
    that many values, you should consider using a different tool.
    7. There will be a substantial reduction in performance if "N" is sorted in descending order. If a descending
    sort is required, use code similar to the following. Performance will decrease by about 27% but it's still
    very fast especially compared with just doing a simple descending sort on "N", which is about 20 times slower.
    If @ZeroOrOne is a 0, in this case, remove the "+1" from the code.

    DECLARE @MaxN BIGINT;
    SELECT @MaxN = 1000;
    SELECT DescendingN = @MaxN-N+1
    FROM dbo.fnTally(1,@MaxN);

    8. There is no performance penalty for sorting "N" in ascending order because the output is explicity sorted by
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT NULL))

    Revision History:
    Rev 00 - Unknown - Jeff Moden
    - Initial creation with error handling for @MaxN.
    Rev 01 - 09 Feb 2013 - Jeff Moden
    - Modified to start at 0 or 1.
    Rev 02 - 16 May 2013 - Jeff Moden
    - Removed error handling for @MaxN because of exceptional cases.

    **********************************************************************************************************************/
    (@ZeroOrOne BIT, @MaxN INT)
    RETURNS TABLE WITH SCHEMABINDING AS
    RETURN WITH
    E1(N) AS (SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL
    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1) --10E1 or 10 rows
    , E3(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E1 a, E1 b, E1 c) --10E3 or 1 Thousand rows
    , E9(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E3 a, E3 b, E3 c) --10E9 or 1 Billion rows
    SELECT N = 0 WHERE ISNULL(@ZeroOrOne,0)= 0 --Conditionally start at 0.
    UNION ALL
    SELECT TOP(@MaxN) N = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT NULL)) FROM E9 -- Values from 1 to @MaxN
    ;





    --Jeff Moden
    "RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for "Row-By-Agonizing-Row".

    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column."

    (play on words) "Just because you CAN do something in T-SQL, doesn't mean you SHOULDN'T." --22 Aug 2013

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to post performance problems
    Post #1657793
    Posted Thursday, February 5, 2015 2:43 AM
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    Thanks Jeff!
    I wasn't expecting an answer now, but it's still useful. I'll definitely test it in my system.
    Post #1657845
    Posted Thursday, February 5, 2015 2:44 AM


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    Hi Jeff,

    I have one also that handles A, B and C

    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/Forums/FindPost1470956.aspx



    MM


    select geometry::STGeomFromWKB(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