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How to prevent a sore throat after hours of presenting ppt ? Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, December 16, 2010 1:24 AM


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Jeff Moden (12/15/2010)
...it's going to take about 4 hours (or more) of preparation time for each hour you're on the podium. If you have working code examples, it may take you 10 or 20 hours of preparation per hour on the podium to actually do it right....


Indeed, that's one thing I knew and invested the time I needed.
This presentation took me days to prepare !
Collecting items and scratch them again, review for completeness, building some demo scripts, test them and double check the results and scripting out (notes) on how to bring the demo in sections, building the solution on the topic you wanted to explain or point to.
Because this was the first big one, I didn't measure the dry-run-time I spend, but I just needed it to get comfortable with my deck of slides and be sure to know when what is coming.

I'm very happy to have been able to find almost everything I needed at SSC to get started.
And yes, I leave the source URLs in my scripts.


And, yes... do get some podium time in front of your local user group. It's a great way to get started.

We'll first see how it goes in-house, but it may open some doors




Johan


Don't drive faster than your guardian angel can fly ...
but keeping both feet on the ground won't get you anywhere

- How to post Performance Problems
- How to post data/code to get the best help


- How to prevent a sore throat after hours of presenting ppt ?


"press F1 for solution", "press shift+F1 for urgent solution"


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Post #1035681
Posted Thursday, December 16, 2010 5:26 AM


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It's going to sound funny when I say this, but the sore throat must have something to do with how you speak. I really don't do anything in particular to prep and I've only had a sore throat once or twice, and I know, one of those was because I caught some disease or other. Possibly you were tense and the tension went into your throat. Make a conscious effort to speak more slowly and possibly a little more quietly. You'll have to experiment. If you can, volunteer for cub scouts. If you can yell over the top of 60 screaming 8-10 y.o. boys, presenting is easy.

As to the adrenalin, I like it. I prefer it. I'm pretty nervous before every presentation. Usually, I'll shadow-box a bit before hand. It pumps me up a bit, but more importantly, it forces me to breathe correctly, so I'm less likely to (notice I didn't say I wouldn't) gasp my way through the presentation because of my excitement.

As to the bladder, it's a race-horse thing. I always have to go about 90 seconds before the presentation starts. First time I presented at the PASS Summit, it was bit of a gamble, because they didn't know me, so a board member was in the room. When I ran out, right before the start, he thought I was going to puke from nervousness, but I just had to prep for the race, if you get my drift.


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Post #1035760
Posted Thursday, December 16, 2010 5:30 AM


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Jeff Moden (12/15/2010)Having some jitters is not a bad thing. Shaking uncontrolably is a bad thing... especially if you've had lots of water to drink.

I was a Navy instructor and was qualified to teach and did, infact, taught all hours of a 26 week 8 hour a day course (1040 hours altogether). I also wrote and taught a 200 hour course on microprocessors and troubleshooting digital interfaces before Bill Gates could spell CPM. I found that the attention span of most folks was limited to about 50 minutes which was perfect... at the top of each hour, I called a 10 minute break and broke the antlers off of anyone that didn't return on time. Since we were all heavy coffee drinkers, the only problem any of us had (I usually had about 30 people in each class) was standing in line for a chance to fully process the coffee.

I taught at that pace for about 2 years. The jitters go away after you've done 3 things... get a little podium time behind you, review the "movie" you made of yourself so you can get rid of your speaking "tics" and shortfalls, and be very well prepared as the subject matter expert. Keep in mind that if it's a new subject for you and you don't have lesson plans, it's going to take about 4 hours (or more) of preparation time for each hour you're on the podium. If you have working code examples, it may take you 10 or 20 hours of preparation per hour on the podium to actually do it right.

I used to do double duty in the Navy... After teaching for 8 hours, I'd have a quick dinner and then study the lesson plans for the next day for about another 8 hours that day. Walking into the classroom the next day knowing full well that no one was going to be able to pin me to the wall with a question really helped the jitters go away.

And, yes... do get some podium time in front of your local user group. It's a great way to get started.


You are an iron man. I'm impressed. Excellent advice too.


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"The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood..." Theodore Roosevelt
The Scary DBA
Author of: SQL Server 2012 Query Performance Tuning
SQL Server 2008 Query Performance Tuning Distilled
and
SQL Server Execution Plans

Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software
Post #1035763
Posted Thursday, December 16, 2010 7:28 AM


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Grant Fritchey (12/16/2010)
It's going to sound funny when I say this, but the sore throat must have something to do with how you speak. I really don't do anything in particular to prep and I've only had a sore throat once or twice, and I know, one of those was because I caught some disease or other. Possibly you were tense and the tension went into your throat. Make a conscious effort to speak more slowly and possibly a little more quietly. You'll have to experiment.


That will indeed be one of the factors I need to take into account.
It has been noted on my checklist

If you can, volunteer for cub scouts. If you can yell over the top of 60 screaming 8-10 y.o. boys, presenting is easy.


Back in the days I was a drill sergeant in the airforce for 2 months. After the first week, my voice was trained enough to roar from a vast distance and still being able to carry over the message

But that's not the way I want to handle my presentations these days

I've been impressed at SQLPASS on how un-damaged you ended your presentition without the sound system working

It is indeed a question of training your voice.


As to the adrenalin, I like it. I prefer it. I'm pretty nervous before every presentation. Usually, I'll shadow-box a bit before hand. It pumps me up a bit, but more importantly, it forces me to breathe correctly, so I'm less likely to (notice I didn't say I wouldn't) gasp my way through the presentation because of my excitement.

As to the bladder, it's a race-horse thing. I always have to go about 90 seconds before the presentation starts. First time I presented at the PASS Summit, it was bit of a gamble, because they didn't know me, so a board member was in the room. When I ran out, right before the start, he thought I was going to puke from nervousness, but I just had to prep for the race, if you get my drift.


It's a good thing we don't always show as we feel it ourself.
It's nice to hear things proceeded as acceptable.


Johan


Don't drive faster than your guardian angel can fly ...
but keeping both feet on the ground won't get you anywhere

- How to post Performance Problems
- How to post data/code to get the best help


- How to prevent a sore throat after hours of presenting ppt ?


"press F1 for solution", "press shift+F1 for urgent solution"


Need a bit of Powershell? How about this

Who am I ? Sometimes this is me but most of the time this is me
Post #1035829
Posted Thursday, December 16, 2010 7:39 AM


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The key to keeping your throat from getting sore is to not swallow that stupid frog in the first place!



Actually, the breathing thing I mentioned on page one of this thread is key to training your voice. If you've already learned to roar, then you probably know a different version of the technique. You can use it, just modify your volume. It's all about projection. Knowing how to throw your voice to the back row of the room without having to yell, raise your voice, or talk inside your throat.


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Posted Thursday, December 16, 2010 11:06 AM
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Brandie Tarvin (12/16/2010)
The key to keeping your throat from getting sore is to not swallow that stupid frog in the first place!

How about a smart frog?
Post #1036002
Posted Friday, December 17, 2010 12:21 PM
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This one was used by the actor who voiced 'Gollum' in the Lord Of the Rings movie, his voice was being trashed badly. I have used it frequently and works suprisingly well.

Lemonaid + Honey + Ginger -- It may take a few times to balance the flavor to be ok.
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Posted Friday, December 17, 2010 12:37 PM


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I would break up the presentations into smaller chunks. Spread them out over a few days. It's hard to take all of that in one sitting. It also helps you to get a break and possibly alter the preso to be more geared towards the interests of the group



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Post #1036704
Posted Friday, December 17, 2010 12:53 PM


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With regards to the beverage, I used milk and honey and that did a good job.
But I will take it into my notes.


That breaking up will indeed be needed if I want to take it to user groups.

For now, after this first presentation, I've already modified it. Left out topics my devs found to deep into the engine and added some details on things I thought my devs already knew about it, but confirmed they needed more info.




Johan


Don't drive faster than your guardian angel can fly ...
but keeping both feet on the ground won't get you anywhere

- How to post Performance Problems
- How to post data/code to get the best help


- How to prevent a sore throat after hours of presenting ppt ?


"press F1 for solution", "press shift+F1 for urgent solution"


Need a bit of Powershell? How about this

Who am I ? Sometimes this is me but most of the time this is me
Post #1036714
Posted Friday, December 17, 2010 2:35 PM


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Unmentioned so far, but useful, and easily hidden... cough drops. Halls in particular are my preferences, the Vitamin C ones with no menthol. They also don't excite the bladder as much as you might with other solutions. You can tuck it in a cheek or under the tongue and use it sparingly.

A lifesaver when, during my incredibly short college acting career, we were doing a lot of work in the round.




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