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Gender Differences in the Workplace Expand / Collapse
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Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 8:45 AM


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Dizzy Desi (10/7/2010)
TravisDBA (10/7/2010)
I disagree Jessica, the world just doesn't work that way. Ideally, it should, but it just doesn't, and as long as human nature is in the equation in the workplace, it never will. As Tobar stated people have their own perceptions that aren't always in line with reality, and that tends to color their viewpoints, and that isn't something you can legislate at the workplace.


Jessica's editorial was very well thought out and well written. I think she would agree with you that the world doesn't work that way. However, where you seem to be saying that human nature can't evolve, Jessica's take was that it can evolve and improve if we strive to act professionally.

Our professional and respectful behavior should be focused upon everyone we encounter, whether in the workplace or not.


Absolutely we can evolve. And we do so by learning more, talking about it, and understanding that those prejudices are just that: prejudices. They don't necessarily apply.

The world of today is miles beyond where it was in 1910, and we have gotten better about being more professional to others. We can go further, and I hope I live to see more professional equality.







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Post #1000570
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 8:51 AM
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Let's put the shoe on the other foot for a second (play some devil's advocet). Recently I attended my son's open house (or back to school, whichever comes first). Every one of the 25 or so staffers and teachers introduced to us was female. Not a single male teacher or administrative staffer. ?

Does it really matter that they're all women? Should we get peeved that there are no males on that staff?


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Post #1000577
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 8:54 AM
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Sometimes I think that I was dropped off on this planet by an alien spacecraft.

Never have I judged a person in the work place on their gender, race, religion or physical characteristics. What I judge them on is how well they participate in the overall project effort and their bottom line contribution.

My basic premise is that I have to work with Jane, Ming, Mohammed and everyone else on the team on a daily basis. My behavior can either improve the work environment or degrade it. If I degrade it, my job gets harder. If I improve it by treating everyone fairly, my job gets easier. Heck, even if someone has some objectionable quality, I just decide that it is something I can ignore or I find ways to work around it. There are exceptions however: bullying, sexual harassment and persistent pessimism. These qualities will have me speaking with my manager or HR in short order.

My first engineering job saw me paired up with a female engineer. She was a socially challenged person who had many quirks (a real nerd's nerd). But it didn't matter. I strove to establish an honest, friendly and supportive work relationship with her and whenever she did something awkward, I just blew it off because it didn't really matter. She was intelligent and got the job done and we worked very well together (probably because I wasn't an intimidating ***).

Bottom line is we have to give our coworkers a break and judge them based on their efforts and work product, not their fashion sense, marital status or whether they like to talk about their favorite sport team at every opportunity.

By the way, I'm one of those gym "meatheads"...
Post #1000581
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 9:29 AM


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amenjonathan (10/7/2010)
Let's put the shoe on the other foot for a second (play some devil's advocet). Recently I attended my son's open house (or back to school, whichever comes first). Every one of the 25 or so staffers and teachers introduced to us was female. Not a single male teacher or administrative staffer. ?

Does it really matter that they're all women? Should we get peeved that there are no males on that staff?

That's one thing I've noticed: almost all teachers in grades K-6 were female, then for junior high and high school, there were more male teachers. I think that it would be good to have a closer to 50-50 mix in schools because boys need good role models as much as girls do. Also, with the increasing number of single-parent households, many boys are growing up never having any kind of male role model.

Post #1000630
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 9:46 AM


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The world of today is miles beyond where it was in 1910


Sometimes, when I stop and look at the state of everything today, I'm not always so sure that is a good thing.....


"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ..."
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Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 10:25 AM
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amenjonathan (10/7/2010)
Let's put the shoe on the other foot for a second (play some devil's advocet). Recently I attended my son's open house (or back to school, whichever comes first). Every one of the 25 or so staffers and teachers introduced to us was female. Not a single male teacher or administrative staffer. ?

Does it really matter that they're all women? Should we get peeved that there are no males on that staff?


This hold trues for the nursing profession. How many people think that it's odd to have a male nurse? There are more female doctors today but the nursing profession is about 99.9% female. Is that good or bad?
Post #1000684
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 10:44 AM


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amenjonathan (10/7/2010)
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Does it really matter that they're all women? Should we get peeved that there are no males on that staff?



If it matters to you, yes. You should encourage more males to go teach if you find that important, and it's a cause that you support. You don't have to support every cause, but you also don't have to dismiss those that others find important.

Both my little ones have had male teachers (K and 3rd) and I though they were excellent. My oldest is in college and considering teaching, which I think is wonderful. I encourage him to pursue it because we need more good teachers.







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Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 10:45 AM


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TravisDBA (10/7/2010)
The world of today is miles beyond where it was in 1910


Sometimes, when I stop and look at the state of everything today, I'm not always so sure that is a good thing.....


I certainly understand that. I'm not sure everything is better. Seems to me an overall work ethic is lacking that used to be more appreciated in our young people.







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Post #1000699
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 10:51 AM


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Steve Jones - SSC Editor (10/7/2010)
TravisDBA (10/7/2010)
The world of today is miles beyond where it was in 1910


Sometimes, when I stop and look at the state of everything today, I'm not always so sure that is a good thing.....


I certainly understand that. I'm not sure everything is better. Seems to me an overall work ethic is lacking that used to be more appreciated in our young people.


True story! Back in our day you had to "pay your dues first", and we accepted that. But kids today want $80-90K all in their first year out of college nowadays, and what's even worse they don't listen either. To really learn and do well in this business you have to listen...


"Technology is a weird thing. It brings you great gifts with one hand, and it stabs you in the back with the other. ..."
Post #1000711
Posted Thursday, October 7, 2010 11:11 AM
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As a woman in technology, I've been fortunate to work in generally enlightened workplaces. What I've struggled against is the perceived career path for women in IT, which is to promptly get away from the technical to move towards more "soft skills" type roles like project management, BA work, or staff management. Stay in a technical role long enough and you will be looked at askance. I know there are technical men who also are uninterested in the management path and resist the general pressure to climb the ladder, but the subtle pressure to become a PM, BA, or supervisor seems to be a little stronger towards women. I happen to LIKE the guts and moving parts of the technical side, and I know I wouldn't succeed as a manager. We all have to mentor others and I do enjoy that, but please don't assume that because I wear a skirt, I want an office with a door and staff reporting to me. I'd like to keep my hands "dirty" in the infrastructure and apps, thanks very much. ;)
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