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Software Vendor Security Expand / Collapse
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Posted Saturday, July 24, 2010 2:33 PM


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Comments posted to this topic are about the item Software Vendor Security






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Post #958428
Posted Saturday, July 24, 2010 4:44 PM
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Two thumbs up. We have an application (FootPrints) that we wont consolidate onto our primary SQL cluster because they insist on using the SA account for their database interaction. I'd thow using the SA account as another very dumb practice.

--Paul Hunter
Post #958440
Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 9:50 AM


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Paul Hunter (7/24/2010)
Two thumbs up. We have an application (FootPrints) that we wont consolidate onto our primary SQL cluster because they insist on using the SA account for their database interaction. I'd thow using the SA account as another very dumb practice.


Is this the same FootPrints that is used for tracking trouble tickets?

The version we have doesn't use the sa password but the user account in use has elevated privileges. We can't change the password for that account on account of it breaking the application. We are in process of migrating away from that application on account of the horrendous security model it uses (as the primary reason).




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Post #958488
Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 9:54 AM


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Mandating a specific account is a sign of a) poor securty and b) crappy development practice.

We used to use Patrol from BMC at a company, and while it required admin/sysadmin privileges on previous Windows versions, it was actually our own developers that "reused" the service account we had set up for Patrol in other places to avoid worrying about security. It took me over a year to get that password changed after I started.







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Post #958489
Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 3:42 PM
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Is this the same FootPrints that is used for tracking trouble tickets?


Yep, that's the one. It's an OK app from the users perspective (I guess) but deserves all the scorn you can heap on it for that practice (as does any other app doing this).

Hint to application developers -- if you're doing your development using the "sa" account or any account that requires SysAdmin permission then you're doing something wrong.


--Paul Hunter
Post #958529
Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 3:49 PM


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Paul Hunter (7/25/2010)
[quote]
Hint to application developers -- if you're doing your development using the "sa" account or any account that requires SysAdmin permission then you're doing something wrong.


And they deserve scorn as well.




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Post #958530
Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 4:27 PM
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I would add as a bad practice vendors that mandate using the server name as a password (?).
Post #958533
Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 7:35 PM
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Don't get me started on this one (if not stopped, I will rant on until deep in the night..... :p)

[rant]
As a (senior) developer myself I've always, always stuck to the rule that any kind of hardcoded configuration in application source-code is reason for immediate termination of contract. Even for one-off applications that will run as an only instance on the only known machine in the company itself for that one-off occasion to do a one-off process.
It's shocking how often I've received a piece of code from one of my developers that wouldn't even run for testing on my PC because the developer hardcoded the database-connection to his own PC-name (and of course user PCs are configured not to accept any SQL-connections from the network, basta!)...

Alas, security in general seems to be a topic everyone will try to avoid until burnt hard personally. How can I tell my son (18) that if he does not install firewalling and anti-virus, he is essentially a willing part of criminal organisations who use such "open" targets for their criminal intent (gone are the days where hacking was a sport with harmless effects like leaving "killroy was here!" messages on your screen.

But the general public and even a large portion of software developers just don't seem to grasp that leaving your PC open for attack is the same as leaving your car-keys in your car in front of a bank with a sign saying "free get-away car for grabs!".
[/rant]

Spread the word on the importance of building security into software from the inside-out, bolting it on top as an afterthought is just not good enough anymore and should not be accepted from any of your vendors.
Post #958541
Posted Monday, July 26, 2010 7:23 AM
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On another website I've seen the suggestion that this is a problem especially for closed source products-- the priority is to get working product out the door often with generations of internal patches and bandaids. Since no one (except possibly hackers) sees these kludges, and the product works properly, the vulnerabilities can go on for decades.

Of course open source products have plenty of problems too, but they are exposed to a lot more eyes, and potentially, re-writes.



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Post #958774
Posted Monday, July 26, 2010 7:37 AM
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One way to get some action (in US companies) is to tell your CIO that the software does comply with the required Sarbanes-Oxley (or other regulatory) guidelines.

That will get the software removed from the system asap.

Tell the vendor the reason why it was removed, and that you have written a letter detailing its security inadequacies to the appropriate regulatory agency for their review.

It will only take one stink-bomb in the press - plus the resultant contract cancellations and huge sales drop - for many software vendors to get the message.

Of course, you better be right and be able to prove you are right, 'cause the software company might come after you.
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