Click here to monitor SSC
SQLServerCentral is supported by Red Gate Software Ltd.
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 
        
Home       Members    Calendar    Who's On


Add to briefcase ««12345»»»

The Reading Poll Expand / Collapse
Author
Message
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:13 AM


Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Friday, October 10, 2014 1:15 PM
Points: 507, Visits: 2,045
I don't have a world of spare time so I only read somewhere between 10 and 20 books per year.

I'm not sure how I feel about the digital reading thing. There certainly seems to be opportunity for "editing" behind the scenes but I don't want to get too paranoid about it.

People who have Kindles sure love them but I'd rather read a book and turn the pages.
Post #759041
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:18 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, May 12, 2014 1:27 PM
Points: 1,386, Visits: 824
I read between 20 and 30 books a year, almost all of them fiction for entertainment. i don't have a kindle or other e-reader.
i think amazon messed up big time. they don't have a robust review system in place, so something was published as an e-book without the actual rightsholders permission. The terms of service also suggest that a purchase is permanent. Should amazon have removed the books from people's kindle libraries? No. Should they be able to? No. With all the hullabaloo over this, i think amazon gets it.
From the coverage on Ars Technica:
The company told Ars that they are "changing [Amazon's] systems so that in the future we will not remove books from customers' devices in these circumstances."


That ars article is posted at:
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/07/amazon-sold-pirated-books-raided-some-kindles.ars
Post #759046
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:24 AM


SSC Veteran

SSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC VeteranSSC Veteran

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 8:35 AM
Points: 242, Visits: 1,242
Well, i have not been counting but maybe I read 30-40 books a year, mostly fiction. I will read 4-5 books on vacation or travel, but it will take a couple of weeks to read a book when I am working. I prefer books to electronic readers but I have a Kindle, Kindle for iPhone and mobipocket on my Blackberry - I endeavor never to be without a book to read. I had the IPhone Kindle app and Blackberry app before I got the Kindle.

My husband gave me the Kindle for my birthday in May and since then I have read 14 books on my Kindle/iPhone plus 5 paper books. He got the Kindle for me in an effort to stem my purchase of physical books since we are out of bookshelf space. I carry the Kindle with me when possible so I am getting more reading done. I will read the same book on the Kindle and iPhone, since I can sync to the last place read on the other device. When at home I read physical books exclusively, in an effort to clear my backlog.

I like that on the Kindle I can have copies of my favorite classics (Jane Austen, edgar Rice Bourroughs) for free or nearly free and have them available to read at any time. I really like the ability to order a book and have it delivered wirelessly at anytime. I have no interest in reading a book on a computer per se. I don't carry a laptop with me at all times.

What I don't like about Kindle books is that I cannot share them. I cannot lend them to another Kindle owner. Also, I cannot give (or receive) a Kindle book as a gift. And books are the best gift ever, IMHO.




Terri

To speak algebraically, Mr. M. is execrable, but Mr. C. is
(x+1)-ecrable.
Edgar Allan Poe
[Discussing fellow writers Cornelius Mathews and William Ellery Channing.]
Post #759052
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:25 AM
Mr or Mrs. 500

Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500Mr or Mrs. 500

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Today @ 9:32 AM
Points: 559, Visits: 1,203
I'm another voracious reader - mostly non-fiction but eagerly awaiting the new Terry Pratchett novel.

I don't do e-books but I was brought up to use and appreciate the free public libraries and usually pop in at lunch break a couple of times a week and often travel to the county town for the larger library or reserve books online.

I do believe children should be taught to use libraries from an early age and parents can set a good example here, taking their children with them to the library and encouraging them to always have books to read, not just electronic amusements such as play stations, pcs, X box, wii or whatever.
My own son has inherited my bookworm traits and my daughter studied English Literature to advanced level and as they grew up the release of the latest Harry Potter book was a fight over who would read it first!
Post #759054
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:27 AM
SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Wednesday, September 19, 2012 10:02 PM
Points: 152, Visits: 86
I read about 10-12 books a year, mostly fiction/Sci-Fi, but an occasional technical programming/sql book. I read a lot of online articles here and elsewhere on the net. It has gotten harder to find time with 2 young ones to read as much as I used to! I don't see paying the cost of an e-reader to have more books in one place and still like the feel of a book in my hands and having books readily on hand to read or trade up for others (which you won't be able to do with your ebooks, btw).

The Amazon thing is typical CYA for any business in these days of frivolous law suits. The fact that they refunded people for the content they took away is supposed to negate the fact that they didn't do their job of verifying the rights of the publisher to the material in the first place. Somebody will end up suing Amazon for the in-humanity and intense heart-ache they experienced from losing this book off their Kindle-just watch! But of course, without these kinds of law suits we wouldn't know that the coffee (which is still steaming!) in that cup from McDonalds was hot-we have that label on the cup to let us know!
Post #759057
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:44 AM
Forum Newbie

Forum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum NewbieForum Newbie

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Tuesday, May 29, 2012 8:11 AM
Points: 3, Visits: 48
I read about 2 books a week, mostly on my Sony Reader. I got the PRS-700 rather than the Kindle because of the built-in light. We've determined that the effort to get new material (sync-ing through a box) is worth it, since if I had instant access to Amazon, I'd be broke. I'm definitley glad that I don't have Amazon "Big Brother" snooping into my reading material. I do like the protability of digital readers and have finally gotten over the need for a "book feel". I have a couple of 8-hr flights coming up next week, so I will be grateful that I don't have to lug a bunch paperbacks around in the carry-on.

There are several times I've been tempted to find ways to read material purchased for other devices. I generally refrain, as I know folks who've had books published and the time/effort they took to create them. The capability to read PDF's on the go has been nice, as I'll snag technical manuals at home for my own use and read them when stranded or can't find a sleeping pill.
Post #759071
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 7:53 AM
Grasshopper

GrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopperGrasshopper

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, July 14, 2014 10:08 AM
Points: 11, Visits: 130
I read about 10-20 books per year. Kind of a mixture of what I am in the mood to read at the time I pick up a book. I recently purchased a Sony e-Reader and really like it, and I hope to increase the number of books read per year, now that I can carry hundreds of books where ever I go, and can sit there and read when I have down time where ever I am at.

I am not sure I like the idea of a large corporation reaching into my personal property and removing an item that I paid for. Granted, there was some legal issues in the latest Amazon incident, but having the ability to reach in and take it doesn't sit well with me. I believe we are one step away from losing our personal privacy with the hoards of people putting their personal lives online at all the social networking sites. I believe that with all this information that people are putting out there, while believing it is only accessible to their friends, is not as private as people think. I also think that when the time is right, our government will take away the right to privacy, and people won't even notice, because they have already posted their private lives on My Space or Facebook.

So, if Amazon can reach into your Kindle and remove what it wants, then what stops other corporations or the government from reaching into our other electronically stored information and taking what they want?
Post #759083
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 8:25 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, September 22, 2014 11:25 AM
Points: 1,137, Visits: 546
I'm constantly reading books from fiction, sci-fi, non-fiction, technical, etc. I haven't even bothered to count the number of books but I'm sure it's somewhere around 50-75 a year.

I like being able to read electronically. I've had a PocketPC for years and I like reading on it but would like it more if it were larger. I've looked at the Kindle, but after seeing what Amazon is capable of doing I'm rethinking that approach. That's very much akin to my purchasing a hard copy book from Barnes & Nobles then having them come into my home, take the book from my shelf, then place the money I paid on the table before leaving. Why should electronic copies be any different?

The other problem with electronic books is that when I purchase books for a particular reader then the reader is now longer available, what do I have left? For example, I have some religious books that are viewable on a reader for the PocketPC that is no longer supported nor can I port them to another format. The same is true for when I transition to the iPhone. What do I do with all of my .LIT books and books in other formats? I still "own" them, but can no longer read them.



"...when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God." -- Mosiah 2:17
Post #759120
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 8:34 AM


Ten Centuries

Ten CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen CenturiesTen Centuries

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Monday, September 22, 2014 11:25 AM
Points: 1,137, Visits: 546
Terri (7/24/2009)
What I don't like about Kindle books is that I cannot share them. I cannot lend them to another Kindle owner. Also, I cannot give (or receive) a Kindle book as a gift. And books are the best gift ever, IMHO.

I couldn't agree more. That's one of the major drawbacks to electronic books. I can share them if I can access them via my computer, but when they're locked into a particular device, then you're stuck. I like having an entire e-library available in a single, easy to carry device, but what do you do if the device is no longer a viable means of reading? You lose you're entire e-library!!



"...when ye are in the service of your fellow beings ye are only in the service of your God." -- Mosiah 2:17
Post #759135
Posted Friday, July 24, 2009 8:37 AM


SSC-Enthusiastic

SSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-EnthusiasticSSC-Enthusiastic

Group: General Forum Members
Last Login: Thursday, November 18, 2010 5:25 AM
Points: 162, Visits: 694
Aaron N. Cutshall (7/24/2009)
What do I do with all of my .LIT books and books in other formats? I still "own" them, but can no longer read them.



Similar to the argument I make regarding the iPod. I'm paying for the pleasure of listening to X. I don't give a rat's @ss that it came to me on a piece of plastic (CD), or if it is encoded in a file on my computer. I further feel nothing about copying it to a format that is convenient for me to listen to.
When I purchased Irma Thomas's Simply Grand, I wanted to listen to it in my car. So I duplicate the CD and stuff that into my car. I also want to listen to it on my MP3 player... No worries. I believe the purchase of the CD allows me to listen to it on different formats. I'm paying for the music, the CD is simply a means to transfer that music.

In your case, you paid for the texts. You shouldn't be bound to use your LIT reader, kindle, or Schwindle...



Honor Super Omnia-
Jason Miller
Post #759140
« Prev Topic | Next Topic »

Add to briefcase ««12345»»»

Permissions Expand / Collapse