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Logship from SQL Server to MYSQL Expand / Collapse
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Posted Wednesday, June 10, 2009 9:40 AM
Grasshopper

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My reporting infrastructure is set up in a way that there is a main production server that all the real-time reports and transactions happen on. That server ships logs to 3 other servers with read only databases. Those servers are responsible for processing all the SQL for the reports in the application that are not required to be real-time. For cost reasons I would like to replace those 3 SQL Servers with MySQL servers. If any of you were presented with this challenge, how would you make it work? Our database size is about 60GB but estimated to grow to many times that over time. Our largest table at the moment is 123 million rows and grows at a rate of 4.6 million per month.

David
Post #732408
Posted Wednesday, June 10, 2009 9:46 AM


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Truth be told, I wouldn't. I am unaware of any tools or products that would read a MS SQL Server t-log backup and restore it to a MySQL database. Depending on the latency required, you may need to use SSIS to transfer data from MS SQL Server to MySQL.



Lynn Pettis

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Post #732413
Posted Wednesday, June 10, 2009 10:09 AM


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You say you want to replace the 3 SQL Server boxes with MySQL for cost reasons. What cost is there in keeping the SQL Server boxes? Your licences for SQL should be paid for already. If you do move those reporting systems to MySQL, you may have to take a log of time to rewrite the queries. Do you have any MySQL admin skills there? If not how much will it cost to get someone in or train someone up?


Gail Shaw
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Post #732434
Posted Wednesday, June 10, 2009 11:13 AM
Grasshopper

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The cost comes in when we have to scale out and add more SQL boxes. Our application is designed in a way that we can add as many database servers as we want. The application will determine load on each of the SQL machines and direct the sql to the appropriate place. If we add say, 7 more SQL servers, that is a significant cost.
Post #732494
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